One of America’s Favorites – Cincinnati Chili

October 8, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A Cincinnati chili 5-way over spaghetti

Cincinnati chili (or Cincinnati-style chili) is a Mediterranean-spiced meat sauce used as a topping for spaghetti (a “two-way”) or hot dogs (“coneys”), both dishes developed by Macedonian immigrant restaurateurs in the 1920s. Ingredients include ground beef, water or stock, tomato paste, spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, cloves, cumin, chili powder, bay leaf, and in some recipes unsweetened dark chocolate in a soupy consistency. Other toppings include cheese, onions, and beans; specific combinations of toppings are known as “ways.” The name “Cincinnati chili” is often confusing to those unfamiliar with it, who expect the dish to be similar to chili con carne; as a result, it is common for those encountering it for the first time to conclude it is a poor example of chili.

While served in many local restaurants, it is most often associated with the over 250 “chili parlors” (restaurants specializing in Cincinnati chili), found throughout greater Cincinnati with franchise locations throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida. The dish is the area’s best-known regional food.

Cincinnati chili originated with immigrant restaurateurs from the Macedonian region who were trying to expand their customer base by moving beyond narrowly ethnic styles of cuisine. Tom and John Kiradjieff began serving a “stew with traditional Mediterranean spices” as a topping for hot dogs which they called “coneys” in 1922 at their hot dog stand located next to a burlesque theater called the Empress. Tom Kiradjieff used the sauce to modify a traditional Greek dish, speculated to have been pastitsio, moussaka or saltsa kima to come up with a dish he called chili spaghetti. He first developed a recipe calling for the spaghetti to be cooked in the chili but changed his method in response to customer requests and began serving the sauce as a topping, eventually adding grated cheese as a topping for both the chili spaghetti and the coneys, also in response to customer requests. To make ordering more efficient, the brothers created the “way” system of ordering. The style has since been copied and modified by many other restaurant proprietors, often fellow Greek and Macedonian immigrants who had worked at Empress restaurants before leaving to open their own chili parlors, often following the business model to the point of locating their restaurants adjacent to theaters.

Empress was the largest chili parlor chain in Cincinnati until 1949, when a former Empress employee and Greek

Price Hill Chili

immigrant, Nicholas Lambrinides, started Skyline Chili. In 1965, four brothers named Daoud, immigrants from Jordan, bought a restaurant called Hamburger Heaven from a former Empress employee, noticed the Cincinnati chili was outselling the hamburgers on their menu, and changed the restaurant’s name to Gold Star Chili. As of 2015 Skyline (over 130 locations) and Gold Star (89 locations) were the largest Cincinnati chili parlor chains, while Empress had only two remaining locations, down from over a dozen during the chain’s most successful period.

Besides Empress, Skyline, and Gold Star, there are also smaller chains such as Dixie Chili and Deli and numerous independents including the acclaimed Camp Washington Chili, probably the most well-known of the independents.Other independents include Pleasant Ridge Chili, Blue Ash Chili, Park Chili Parlor, Price Hill Chili, Chili Time, and the Blue Jay Restaurant, in all totalling more than 250 chili parlors. In addition to the chili parlors, some version of Cincinnati chili is commonly served at many local restaurants. Arnold’s Bar and Grill, the oldest bar in the city, serves a vegetarian “Cincy Lentils” dish ordered in “ways”. Melt Eclectic Cafe offers a vegan 3-way. For Restaurant Week 2018, a local mixologist developed a cocktail called “Manhattan Skyline,” a Cincinnati chili-flavored whiskey cocktail.

The history of Cincinnati chili shares many factors in common with the apparently independent but simultaneous development of the Coney Island hot dog in other areas of the United States. “Virtually all” were developed by Greek or Macedonian immigrants who passed through Ellis Island as they fled the fallout from the Balkan Wars in the first two decades of the twentieth century.

Raw ground beef is crumbled in water and/or stock, tomato paste and seasonings are added, and the mixture is brought to a boil and then simmered for several hours to form a thin meat sauce. Many recipes call for an overnight chill in the refrigerator to allow for easy skimming of fat and to allow flavors to develop, then reheating to serve. Typical proportions are 2 pounds of ground beef to 4 cups of water and 6 oz tomato paste to make 8 servings.

Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on a specific ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, grated cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Customers order a:

Two-way: spaghetti topped with chili (also called “chili spaghetti”)

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

Three-way: spaghetti, chili, and cheese

Four-way onion: spaghetti, chili, cheese, and onions

Five-way: spaghetti, chili, cheese, onions, and beans

Some restaurants, among them Skyline and Gold Star, do not use the term “four-way bean”, instead using the term “four-way” to denote a three-way plus the customer’s choice of onions or beans. Some restaurants may add extra ingredients to the “way” system; for example, Dixie Chili offers a “six-way”, which adds chopped garlic to a five-way. “Ways” are traditionally served in a shallow oval bowl. Cincinnati chili is also used as a hot dog topping to make a “coney”, a regional variation on the Coney Island chili dog, which is topped with grated cheddar cheese to make a “cheese coney”. The standard coney also includes mustard and chopped onion. The “Three-way” and the “Cheese Coney” are the most popular orders and very few customers order a bowl of plain chili. Most chili parlors do not offer plain chili as a regular menu item.

Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili, and a mild hot sauce such as Tabasco is frequently available to be used as an optional topping to be added at the table. Locals eat Cincinnati chili with a fork, cutting each bite as if it were a casserole and never twirling.

Cincinnati chili is the area’s “best known regional food”. According to the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors

Cheese coneys

Bureau, Cincinnatians consume more than 2,000,000 lb (910,000 kg) of Cincinnati chili each year, topped by 850,000 lb (390,000 kg) of shredded cheddar cheese. Overall industry revenues were $250 million in 2014.

Anthony Bourdain called it, “the story of America on your plate.” National food critics Jane and Michael Stern wrote, “As connoisseurs of blue-plate food, we consider Cincinnati chili one of America’s quintessential meals” and “one of this nation’s most distinctive regional plates of food”. Huffington Post named it one of “15 Beloved Regional Dishes”. In 2000, Camp Washington Chili won a James Beard Foundation America’s Classics Award. In 2013, Smithsonian named Cincinnati chili one of “20 Most Iconic Foods in America”, calling out Camp Washington Chili as their destination of choice. John McIntyre, writing in the Baltimore Sun, called it “the most perfect of fast foods”, and, referring to the misnomer, opined that “if the Greeks who invented it nearly a century ago had called it something other than chili, the [chili] essentialists would be able to enjoy it”. In 2015, Thrillist named it “the one food you must eat in Ohio.”

 

The Cincinnati Chili Trail

March 22, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in chili | Leave a comment
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Those of you that live or have visited know how delicious the Chili is here in this area is. Cheese Coneys, Chili Spaghetti, Chili Sandwich, 3-Way, 4-Way, or 5-Way we have them all here. But if you have never had the pleasure of following The Cincinnati Chili Trail, here’s your guide. Enjoy and that Chili! The link to full article is at the bottom of the post.

The Cincinnati Chili Trail

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

A tour of treasured neighborhood chili joints is a delicious way to get to know the Queen City’s diverse enclaves.

If you’ve lived in Cincinnati for any amount of time, you’ve likely stumbled into the center of a debate between die-hard fans of Skyline and Gold Star: which local chili chain is the best? Both founded by immigrants — Skyline in 1949 by Greek transplant Nicholas Lambrinides and Gold Star in 1965 by the four Jordanian Daoud brothers — they used secret family recipes to create the city’s top feuding chili empires, spreading saucy meat and golden cheese across the Tristate.

But if partisan chili politics isn’t your thing, you can always take the road less traveled and try your tastebuds at a neighborhood parlor, which are just as steeped in tradition and their own unique recipes. Some, like iconic (and James Beard Award-winning) Camp Washington Chili or Food Network-featured Blue Ash Chili are already famous in their own right. Others? Others are more obscure and may not haven’t gotten the Guy Fieri stamp of approval, but are just as vital — and delicious — community institutions.

Starting with the godfather of chili parlors, Empress Chili, and working our way around the city from Northside to Newport, we tried to get a taste for the history and cuisine of several distinct neighborhood spots. We not only discovered the impact that Empress has had as the proverbial trunk of the local family tree of chili joints, but also that noodles slathered in meat sauce taste distinct at each destination.

We couldn’t visit every cherished chili parlor, but here are the fables and flavors behind those we did…….
* Click the link to read the full article
https://www.citybeat.com/food-drink/eats-feature/media-gallery/20995215/the-cincinnati-chili-trail

 

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