Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe – Louisiana Fried Chicken

October 13, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday's Chicken Dinner | Leave a comment
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This week’s Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe is – Louisiana Fried Chicken. What’s better than Fried Chicken for the Family Sunday Dinner! Kick up that Fried Chicken dinner with this week’s recipe of Louisiana Fried Chicken! Along with the Chicken Parts some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are; Buttermilk, Low Sodium Chicken Broth, Cornmeal, Peppers, Onion, and a variety of Spices. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website which has one of the largest selections of recipes to please all tastes! Be sure to check it out soon! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Louisiana Fried Chicken
Brining chicken in buttermilk tenderizes the chicken, enhances the flavor and reacts with the seasoned flour-cornmeal coating for an exceptionally crispy breading.

Recipe Ingredients:
2 1/2 pounds chicken parts, rinsed and patted dry
1 cup buttermilk
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup yellow cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
1 1/2 teaspoons paprika
4 cups vegetable oil, for frying
Pepper Sauce: (optional)
1 tablespoon butter
1 1/4 cups no-salt or low-sodium chicken broth
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1/2 green pepper, finely chopped
1/2 red pepper, finely chopped
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
1/4 teaspoon salt

Cooking Directions:
1 – Place chicken in large, glass bowl or dish; pour buttermilk over it. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
2 – In medium bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, salt, celery salt, pepper, paprika and cayenne. Dredge chicken pieces in flour, two at a time, turning to coat all sides thoroughly. Set chicken on a rack and let sit for 30 minutes.
3 – In medium saucepan over medium heat, warm butter. Stir in onion, red pepper and green pepper. Stew peppers until soft, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in flour and cayenne. Cook for 2 minutes, stirring often. Gradually stir in chicken broth. Bring sauce to simmer; reduce heat to low and let cook until thickened, about 5 minutes. Add salt; remove from heat and set aside until needed.
4 – In large, cast iron skillet add oil to fill 3/4-inch deep. Over medium-high heat, warm oil to 350°F ( 175°C) using kitchen thermometer to test oil temperature. Carefully place chicken, skin-side-down in oil. Reduce heat to medium and cook chicken for 15 minutes until nicely browned. Turn chicken and cook for additional 10 minutes, until internal temperature registers 180°F (85°C) on thermometer. Remove chicken and drain on paper towels. Cook remaining chicken in same manner until done.
5 – Before serving, reheat sauce and pass separately.

s 4 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/chicken/louisiana_fried_chicken_recipe.html

It’s all about the Chicken! – Freezing Chicken

August 26, 2014 at 5:32 AM | Posted in chicken, It's All About the Chicken | Leave a comment
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A chicken breast, wing, leg and thigh fried

A chicken breast, wing, leg and thigh fried

Raw chicken maintains its quality longer in the freezer as compared to when having been cooked because moisture is lost during cooking. There is little change in nutrient value of chicken during freezer storage. For optimal quality, however, a maximal storage time in the freezer of 12 months is recommended for uncooked whole chicken, 9 months for uncooked chicken parts, 3 to 4 months for uncooked chicken giblets, and 4 months for cooked chicken. Freezing doesn’t usually cause color changes in poultry, but the bones and the meat near them can become dark. This bone darkening results when pigment seeps through the porous bones of young poultry into the surrounding tissues when the poultry meat is frozen and thawed.

 

 

 

It is safe to freeze chicken directly in its original packaging, however this type of wrap is permeable to air and quality may diminish over time. Therefore, for prolonged storage, it is recommended to overwrap these packages. It is recommended to freeze unopened vacuum packages as is. If a package has accidentally been torn or has opened while food is in the freezer, the food is still safe to use, but it is still recommended to overwrap or rewrap it. Chicken should be away from other foods, so if they begin to thaw, their juices won’t drip onto other foods. If previously frozen chicken is purchased at a retail store, it can be refrozen if it has been handled properly. Chicken can be cooked or reheated from the frozen state, but it will take approximately one and a half times as long to cook, and any wrapping or absorbent paper should be discarded.

 

It’s all about the Chicken! – Chicken Feet

August 12, 2014 at 5:35 AM | Posted in It's All About the Chicken | Leave a comment
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This week is about Chicken Feet. I have to admit I’ve never tried them, and can’t say I ever will. But they are popular around the World so It’s all about the Chicken (Feet).

 

Chicken feet and other chicken parts for sale on a roadside cart in Haikou, Hainan, China.

Chicken feet and other chicken parts for sale on a roadside cart in Haikou, Hainan, China.

Chicken feet are a part of the chicken that is eaten in China, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, South Africa, Peru, Mexico, Philippines, Middle East and Vietnam. Most of the edible tissue on the feet consists of skin and tendons, with no muscle. This gives the feet a distinct texture different from the rest of the chicken’s meat. Its many small bones make it difficult to eat for some; these are often picked before serving. Being mostly skin, chicken feet are very gelatinous.

 

 

 
Chicken feet are utilized in several regional Chinese cuisines; they can be served as a beer snack, cold dish, soup or main dish.

In Guangdong and Hong Kong, they are typically deep fried and steamed first to make them puffy before being stewed and simmered in a sauce flavoured with black fermented beans, bean paste, and sugar; or in abalone sauce.

In mainland China, popular snack bars specializing in marinated food such as yabozi (duck’s necks), marinated chicken feet), which are simmered with soy sauce, Sichuanese peppercorn, clove, garlic, star anise, cinnamon and chili flakes. Today, packaged chicken feet are sold in most grocery stores and supermarkets in China as a snack, often seasoned with rice vinegar and chili. Another popular recipe is bai yun feng zhao, which is marinated in a sauce of rice vinegar, rice wine flavored with sugar, salt, and minced ginger for an extended period of time and served as a cold dish. In southern China, they also cook chicken feet with raw peanuts to make a thin soup.

 

 

 

Chicken feet from a dim sum restaurant in the Netherlands

Chicken feet from a dim sum restaurant in the Netherlands

The huge demand in China raises the price of chicken feet, which are often used as fodder in other countries. As of June 2011, 1 kg of raw chicken feet costs around 12 to 16 yuan in China, compared to 11–12 yuan for 1 kg of frozen chicken breast. In 2000, Hong Kong, once the largest entrepôt for shipping chicken feet from over 30 countries, traded a total of 420,000 tons of chicken feet at the value of US$230 million.Two years after China joined the WTO in 2001, China has approved the direct import of American chicken feet, and since then, China has been the major destination of chicken feet from around the globe.

Aside from chicken feet, duck feet are also popular.Duck feet with mustard, which is often served with vinegar, fresh green pepper and crushed garlic, is a popular salad/appetizer.

 

 

 
* Korean cuisine
Chicken feet are basted in a hot red pepper sauce and then grilled. They are often eaten as a second course and served with alcohol.

 

 

* Malaysian cuisine
Chicken feet are known as ceker in Malaysia and are traditionally popular mostly among Malays of Javanese, Chinese and Siamese descent. Many traditional Malay restaurants in the state of Johor offer chicken feet that are cooked together with Malay-style curry and eaten with roti canai. In the state of Selangor, chicken feet are either boiled in soup until the bones are soft with vegetables and spices or deep fried in palm oil. Chicken feet are also eaten by [Malaysian Chinese] in Malaysia in traditional Chinese cooking style.

 

 

* Trinidadian cuisine
In Trinidad, the chicken feet are cleaned, seasoned, boiled in seasoned water, and left to soak with cucumbers, onions, peppers and green seasoning until cool. It is eaten as a party dish called chicken foot souse.

 

 

* South African cuisine
In South Africa, chicken feet are mainly eaten in townships in all nine provinces, where they are known as “walkie talkies” (together with the head, intestine, hearts and giblets) and “chicken dust”, respectively. The feet are submerged in hot water, so the outer layer of the skin can be removed by peeling it off, and then covered in seasonings and grilled. The name “chicken dust” derives from the dust chickens create when scratching the ground with their feet.

 

 
* Jamaican cuisine
In Jamaican cuisine, chicken feet are mainly used to make chicken foot soup. The soup contains yams, potatoes, green/yellow banana, dumplings and special spices in addition to the chicken feet, and is slow cooked for a minimum of two hours. Chicken feet are also curried or stewed and served as a main part of a meal.

 

 

* Mexican cuisine
Chicken feet are a popular ingredient across Mexico, particularly in stews and soups. They are often steamed to become part of a main dish with rice, vegetables and most likely another part of the chicken, such as the breast or thighs. The feet can be seasoned with mole sauce. On occasion, they are breaded and fried.

Many people will also take the chicken feet in hand as a snack and chew the soft outer skin. The inner bone structure is left uneaten.

 

 

* Philippine cuisine
In the Philippines, chicken feet are marinated in a mixture of calamansi, spices and brown sugar before being grilled. A popular staple in Philippine street food, chicken feet are commonly known as “adidas” (named after the athletic shoe brand Adidas).

 

 

 

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