One of America’s Favorites – Cincinnati Chili

June 28, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

Cincinnati chili (or Cincinnati-style chili) is a Mediterranean-spiced meat sauce used as a topping for spaghetti or hot dogs (“coneys”); both dishes were developed by Macedonian immigrant restaurateurs in the 1920s. In 2013, Smithsonian named it one of the “20 Most Iconic Foods in America”. Its name evokes comparison to chili con carne, but the two are dissimilar in consistency, flavors and serving methods, which for Cincinnati chili more resemble Greek pasta sauces and the spiced-meat hot dog topping sauces seen in other parts of the United States.

Ingredients include ground beef, water or stock, tomato paste, spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, clove, cumin, chili powder, bay leaf, and in some home recipes unsweetened dark chocolate in a soupy consistency. The most popular order is a ‘three-way’, which adds shredded cheddar cheese to the chili-topped spaghetti (‘two-way’), while serving it ‘four-‘ or ‘five-ways’ comes from addition of chopped onions and/or beans. Dishes are often served with oyster crackers and a mild hot sauce. Cincinnati chili is almost never served or eaten by the bowl.

While served in many local restaurants, it is most often associated with the over 250 independent and chain “chili parlors” (restaurants specializing in Cincinnati chili) found throughout greater Cincinnati with franchise locations throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, Florida, and the Middle East. The dish is the Cincinnati area’s best-known regional food.

Skyline Chili location in Cincinnati

Cincinnati chili originated with immigrant restaurateurs from Macedonia who were trying to expand their customer base by moving beyond narrowly ethnic styles of cuisine. Ethnic Macedonians Tom and John Kiradjieff immigrated from the town of Hrupishta (today’s Argos Orestiko in Greece), fleeing the Balkan Wars, ethnic rivalries, and bigotry, in 1921. They began serving a “stew with traditional Mediterranean spices” as a topping for hot dogs which they called “coneys” in 1922 at their hot dog stand located next to a burlesque theater called the Empress, which they named their business after. Tom Kiradjieff used the sauce to modify a traditional Greek dish, speculated to have been pastitsio, moussaka or saltsa kima to come up with a dish he called chili spaghetti. He first developed a recipe calling for the spaghetti to be cooked in the chili but changed his method in response to customer requests and began serving the sauce as a topping, eventually adding grated cheese as a topping for both the chili spaghetti and the coneys, also in response to customer requests.

To make ordering more efficient, the brothers created the “way” system of ordering. The style has since been copied and modified by many other restaurant proprietors, often fellow Greek and Macedonian immigrants who had worked at Empress restaurants before leaving to open their own chili parlors, often following the business model to the point of locating their restaurants adjacent to theaters.

Empress was the largest chili parlor chain in Cincinnati until 1949, when a former Empress employee and Greek immigrant, Nicholas Lambrinides, started Skyline Chili. In 1965, four brothers named Daoud, immigrants from Jordan, bought a restaurant called Hamburger Heaven from a former Empress employee. They noticed that the Cincinnati chili was outselling the hamburgers on their menu and changed the restaurant’s name to Gold Star Chili. As of 2015, Skyline (over 130 locations) and Gold Star (89 locations) were the largest Cincinnati chili parlor chains, while Empress had only two remaining locations, down from over a dozen during the chain’s most successful period.

Gold Star Chili restaurant interior

Besides Empress, Skyline, and Gold Star, there are also smaller chains such as Dixie Chili and Deli and numerous independents including the acclaimed Camp Washington Chili. Other independents include Pleasant Ridge Chili, Blue Ash Chili, Park Chili Parlor, Price Hill Chili, Chili Time, Orlando based Cincinnati Chili Company, and the Blue Jay Restaurant, in all totalling more than 250 chili parlors. In 1985 one of the founders of Gold Star Chili, Fahid Daoud, returned to Jordan, where he opened his own parlor, called Chili House. Outside of Jordan, Chili House as of 2020 had locations in Iran, Iraq, Libya, Oman, Palestine, Turkey and Qatar.

In addition to the chili parlors, some version of Cincinnati chili is commonly served at many local restaurants. Arnold’s Bar and Grill, the oldest bar in the city, serves a vegetarian “Cincy Lentils” dish ordered in “ways.” Melt Eclectic Cafe offers a vegan 3-way. For Restaurant Week 2018, a local mixologist developed a cocktail called “Manhattan Skyline,” a Cincinnati chili-flavored whiskey cocktail.

The history of Cincinnati chili shares many factors in common with the apparently independent but simultaneous development of the Coney Island hot dog in other areas of the United States. “Virtually all” were developed by Greek or Macedonian immigrants who passed through Ellis Island as they fled the fallout from the Balkan Wars in the first two decades of the twentieth century.

Partially eaten 5-way from Skyline, garnished with oyster crackers

Raw ground beef is crumbled in water and/or stock, tomato paste and seasonings are added, and the mixture is brought to a boil and then simmered for several hours to form a thin meat sauce. Many recipes call for an overnight chill in the refrigerator to allow for easy skimming of fat and to allow flavors to develop, then reheating to serve. Typical proportions are 2 pounds of ground beef to 4 cups of water and 6 oz tomato paste to make 8 servings.

Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on a specific ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, shredded cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Customers order a:

* Two-way: spaghetti topped with chili (also called “chili spaghetti”)
* Three-way: spaghetti, chili, and cheese
* Four-way onion: spaghetti, chili, onions, and cheese
* Four-way bean: spaghetti, chili, beans, and cheese
* Five-way: spaghetti, chili, beans, onions, and cheese
small oval white plate with cheese coney showing bun, hot dog, sauce, and shredded cheese
Skyline cheese coney (hot dog topped with Cincinnati-style chili, mustard, onions, and a heap of shredded cheese)

Skyline cheese coney (hot dog topped with Cincinnati-style chili, mustard, onions, and a heap of shredded cheese)

* Some chili parlors will also serve the dish “inverted”: cheese on the bottom, so that it melts. Some restaurants, among them Skyline and Gold Star, do not use the term “four-way bean”, instead using the term “four-way” to denote a three-way plus the customer’s choice of onions or beans. Some restaurants may add extra ingredients to the way system; for example, Dixie Chili offers a “six-way”, which adds chopped garlic to a five-way. Cincinnati chili is also used as a hot dog topping to make a “coney”, a regional variation on the Coney Island chili dog, which is topped with shredded cheddar cheese to make a “cheese coney”. The standard coney also includes mustard and chopped onion. The “three-way” and the cheese coney are the most popular orders.

Very few customers order a bowl of plain chili. Most chili parlors do not offer plain chili as a regular menu item. Polly Campbell, former food editor of The Cincinnati Enquirer, calls ordering a bowl of chili, “Ridiculous. Would you order a bowl of spaghetti sauce? Because that’s what you’re doing.”

Serving and eating
Ways and coneys are traditionally served in a shallow oval bowl. Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili,[9] and a mild hot sauce such as Tabasco is frequently available to be used as an optional topping to be added at the table. Locals eat Cincinnati chili as if it were a casserole, cutting each bite with the side of the fork instead of twirling the noodles.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Chili Dog

November 30, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A chili-cheese dog with fries

Chili dog is the generic name for a hot dog served in a bun and topped with some sort of meat sauce, such as chili con carne. Often other toppings are also added, such as cheese, onions, and mustard. The style has multiple regional variations in the United States, many calling for specific and unique sauce ingredients, types of hot dogs, or types of buns and referred to regionally under region-specific names.

Texas weiner
In New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the “Texas hot dog”, “Texas chili dog.” “Texas hot’,” or “Texas wiener” is a hot dog with chili or hot sauce; it is served in variations with assorted condiments. The Texas wiener was created in Paterson, New Jersey, before 1920 and in Altoona, Pennsylvania, by Peter “George” Koufougeorgas in 1918 and originally called Texas Hot Wieners. The “Texas” reference is to the chili sauce used on the dogs, which actually has a stronger Greek cuisine influence due to the ethnicity of the cooks who invented it. It is considered a unique regional hot dog style. From its origins, the invention spread to the Pennsylvania cities of Scranton and Philadelphia. By the 1920s, it had reached Western New York, where numerous long standing hot dog stands still remain, including a stand run by the Rigas Family (dating to 1921) and Ted’s Hot Dogs (which opened in 1927).

Coney Island hot dog
In southeastern Michigan, a Coney Island hot dog is a European-style Frankfurter Würstel (Vienna sausage) of German origin with a natural lamb or sheep casing, topped with a beef heart-based sauce, which was developed by Macedonian and Greek immigrants in the area. It has several local variations, including Detroit style, Flint style, and Jackson style.

A Flint-style Coney Island hot dog

Hot wiener
In Rhode Island the hot wiener or New York System wiener is a staple of the food culture and is served at “New York System” restaurants. The traditional wiener is made with a small, thin hot dog made of veal and pork, giving it a different taste from a traditional beef hot dog, served in a steamed bun, and topped with celery salt, yellow mustard, chopped onions, and a seasoned meat sauce.

Michigan hot dog
In the North Country of New York State, a Michigan hot dog, or “Michigan”, is a steamed hot dog on a steamed bun topped with a meaty sauce, generally referred to as “Michigan sauce.”

Cheese coneys

Cheese coneys
In Greater Cincinnati, Cheese coneys or Coney Islands (without the cheese) are hot dogs in buns topped with Cincinnati chili (a Greek-inspired meat sauce), onions, mustard, and cheese.

Carolina style
In North Carolina, hot dogs topped with chili, onions, and either mustard or slaw are referred to as “Carolina style”, which is also used to refer to hamburgers with similar toppings.

Half-smoke

In Washington, D.C., the half-smoke is similar to a hot dog, but usually larger, spicier, and with more coarsely-ground meat, the sausage is often half-pork and half-beef, smoked, and served with herbs, onion, and chili sauce.

A half smoke

 

 

It’s all about the Chili in Cincinnati………..

November 11, 2019 at 3:20 PM | Posted in chili | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Very good article in the Sunday Edition of the Cincinnati Enquirer, click the link at the bottom of the post to read the entire article. It’s Chili Time!

 

It came in at No. 52 on Deadspin’s ranked list of foods by state. (51 was being hit by a car.) The New York Times was horrified by it. A lot of people who aren’t from Cincinnati –food bloggers, commentators, Yelpers from out of town – don’t like Cincinnati chili. Some of them can be condescending, dismissive and downright mean.

And we don’t care! Although Cincinnati basks in positive attention like being seventh best place for recent college grads, we don’t give a single coney with mustard what they say about our chili. That brick-colored splash that won’t come out of your blouse? That’s a badge of honor. It declares membership in an exclusive club.

Exclusive because Cincinnati is not blind to the weirdness of our chili. It’s not obvious like Buffalo wings or New Orleans gumbo. Anyone can like those! But if anyone can join, it’s not a club. Three-ways, tiny coneys, four-way with onion? Those you have to be born to love or make a conscious effort to see the light.

Chili pulls us together against the world. Anytime you’re eating chili, you know many of your city mates are eating it, too, though you may have nothing else in common with them. At one of my favorite places for a Greek salad and a couple of coneys, the Skyline at Fourth and Sycamore, there are businessmen in suits, ties flung over their shoulder, grabbing lunch. There are also guys who do building maintenance.

From time to time, I’ve thought about proclaiming the best Cincinnati chili. But I’m more interested in the variety: how chili is the same but different all over town. And how each Cincinnatian makes the experience their own. So I spent a few weeks just going to get chili with people at lunch or dinner or later in the evening. We talked about a lot of things. Including chili………
https://www.cincinnati.com/story/entertainment/dining/2019/11/08/skyline-gold-star-empress-dixie-camp-washington-blue-ash-pleasant-ridge-identities-cincinnati-chili/3929488002/

One of America’s Favorites – Coney Island Hot Dog

January 21, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A Coney Dog

A Coney Island Hot Dog (or Coney Dog or Coney) is a hot dog in a bun topped with a savory meat sauce and sometimes other toppings. It is often offered as part of a menu of dishes of Greek origin and classic American ‘diner’ dishes and often at Coney Island restaurants. It is largely a phenomenon related to immigration from Greece and Macedonia to the United States in the early 20th century.

“Virtually all” Coney Island variations were developed, apparently independently, by Greek or Macedonian immigrants in the early 1900s, many fleeing the Balkan Wars, who entered the US through Ellis Island in New York City. Family stories of the development of the dishes often included anecdotes about visits to Coney Island.

In 1913 the Coney Island Chamber of Commerce in New York had banned the use of the term “hot dog” on restaurant signs on Coney Island, an action prompted by concerns about visitors taking the term literally and assuming there was dog meat in the sausage. Because of this action by the Chamber of Commerce, immigrants passing through the area didn’t know the sausage in a bun by the American moniker “hot dog.” Instead, the handheld food would have been known to immigrants as a “coney island.”

The name coney can be traced back over a hundred years as a 48 acre peninsula in County Down, Northern Ireland inhabited by small rabbits called conies. The hamlet was later called Coney Island albeit was not really an island. It eventually became a park and offered many amenities for entertainment and food. As Irish immigrants moved to the United States some entrepreneurs wanted to copy the same type of park. As the original Coney Island started in New York other unrelated Coney Islands opened in Michigan and Ohio.

As the legend goes, one particular vender of Vienna sausage sandwiches, later called Weiners then hot dogs decided to dress up the hand held sandwiches with chili, onions and several other items. They came to be know as coney islands. While chili dogs are known throughout the country, it seems the original name has stuck in the Cincinnati, Ohio area as several hundred chili parlors sells what is simply called a coney today.

 

Regional and local varieties
Indiana

Coney Islands at Ft. Wayne’s Famous Coney Island Wiener Stand
Ft. Wayne’s Famous Coney Island Wiener Stand was opened in 1914 by three now-unknown Macedonian immigrants. Vasil Eschoff, another Macedonian immigrant, purchased an interest from one of the original owners in 1916. Eschoff’s descendants have operated the restaurant since. The Coney Island in Fort Wayne is described as a small, fatty pink hot dog with a “peppery-sweet” coney sauce on a soft bun. However, the ground beef-based coney sauce at Ft. Wayne’s Famous Coney Island Wiener Stand has the flavor and consistency of a mild peppered savory pork sausage, reflecting its Macedonian heritage. The small hot dog is grilled on a flattop, placed in a steamed bun, yellow mustard applied, then a few teaspoonfuls of the savory chili sauce are added which is then topped with chopped yellow onion.

A Flint-style coney (with dry coney sauce) at Rio’s Coney Island in Flint

Michigan
Jane and Michael Stern, writing in 500 Things to Eat Before it’s Too Late, note that “there’s only one place to start [to pinpoint the top Coney Islands], and that is Detroit. Nowhere is the passion for them more intense.”: James Schmidt, in a debate at the 2018 National Fair Food Summit, noted that “Detroit is synonymous with the Coney Dog: you simply cannot have one without the other.”

The Coney Island developed in Michigan is a natural-casing beef or beef and pork European-style Wiener Würstchen (Vienna sausage) of German origin, topped with a beef heart-based sauce, one or two stripes of yellow mustard and diced or chopped onions. The variety is a fixture in Flint, Detroit, Jackson, Kalamazoo, and southeastern Michigan. The style originated in the early 20th century, with competing claims from American and Lafayette Coney Islands (1917) in Detroit, and Todoroff’s Original Coney Island (1914) in Jackson. The longest continuously operated Coney Island (in the same location) is in Kalamazoo (1915).

Detroit style

Competing neighboring Coney restaurants in Detroit
In Detroit historically many Greek and Macedonian immigrants operated Coney islands, or restaurants serving Detroit Coney dogs. By 2012 many Albanians began operating them as well. The Greeks established Onassis Coney Island, which has closed. Greek immigrants established the Coney chains Kerby’s Koney Island, Leo’s Coney Island, and National Coney Island during the 1960s and early 1970s. All three chains sell some Greek food items with Coney dogs. Detroit style sauce is a bean-less chili sauce, differing from the chili dogs they offer only in the lack of beans. National has most of its restaurants on the east side of the city, and Kerby’s and Leo’s have the bulk of their restaurants on the west side of the Detroit area.

Flint style

A Flint-style coney (with dry coney sauce) at Rio’s Coney Island in Flint
Flint style is characterized by a dry hot dog topping made with a base of ground beef heart, which is ground to a consistency of fine-ground beef. Some assert that in order to be an “authentic” Flint coney, the hot dog must be a Koegel coney and the sauce by Angelo’s, which opened in 1949. However, the sauce was originally developed by a Macedonian in 1924, Simion P. (Sam) Brayan, for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat to provide the fine-grind beef heart sauce base. Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1924 sauce base available to restaurants and the public through the Koegel Meat Company and Abbott’s Meats. Restaurants then add chopped onions sautéed in beef tallow, along with their own spice mix and other ingredients, to Abbott’s sauce base to make their sauce.

Popular folklore perpetuates a myth that a Flint coney sauce recipe containing ground beef and ground hot dogs is the “original” Flint Coney sauce recipe. Variations on this story include either that a relative of the storyteller knew or worked with the former owner of Flint’s Original and received the recipe from them, or that the wife of the owner of Flint’s Original allowed the publication of the recipe in the Flint Journal after his death. Ron Krueger, longtime food writer of the Flint Journal, included it in a collection of recipes from the newspaper but without a cited source, unlike the rest of the recipes in the collection. When asked about this Mr. Krueger replied, “That recipe appeared in The Journal several times over the years. [I don’t] think I ever saw it in the context of a story or ever saw any attribution. It always included the word ‘original’ in the title, but anybody who knows anything knows otherwise.” As to the second myth of Brayan’s wife later allowing the publication of the recipe, Velicia Brayan died in 1976, while Simion Brayan lived until the age of 100 and died in 1990. The actual source of this recipe appears to be an earlier Flint Journal Food Editor, Joy Gallagher, who included the recipe in her column of May 23, 1978. In that column she stated she had included the recipe in an even earlier column. Her apparent source was “a woman who said she was the wife of a chef at the original Coney Island, and that she copied the recipe from his personal recipe book.” Gallagher stated “I believe her”. However, Gallagher also wrote, “I’m not making any claims”. In the same column she also included a second recipe that used beef heart, which she wrote “came to me recently from a reader who swears it is the sauce served at Angelo’s.” The folklore has mixed the supposed sources of the two recipes in this column from Gallagher, with people claiming the ground hot dog recipe is reportedly from Angelo’s. In his column published in the Flint Journal on April 18, 1995, Food Editor Ron Krueger reported taking Gallagher’s ground hot dog recipe directly to Angelo’s co-owner Tom V. Branoff, who refuted the recipe line-by-line. Gallagher’s pre-1978 column is still being researched.

Jackson style
Jackson style uses a topping of either ground beef or ground beef heart, onions and spices. The sauce is traditionally a thick hearty one whether ground beef or ground beef heart is used. This meat sauce is applied on a quality hotdog in a steamed bun and then topped with diced or chopped onions and a stripe of mustard. The Todoroffs’ restaurants were some of the earlier locations for Jackson coneys beginning in 1914. However, those locations are now closed. The company currently manufactures and distribute their coney sauce for retail purchase at supermarkets or other restaurants. There are several other coney restaurants in the area, most notably Jackson Coney Island and Virginia Coney Island, both of which are located on East Michigan Avenue in front of the train station near where the original Todoroff’s restaurant was located. These restaurants all use a blend of onion and spices similar to Todoroff’s but use ground beef heart instead of ground beef for the coney sauce. The Jackson style was late to the usage of beef heart in the sauce, using ground beef prior to converting to ground beef heart in the early 1940s. Jackson takes their coneys very seriously. Each year Jackson Magazine or the Jackson Citizen Patriot have a best coney contest voted on by residents for all the restaurants in the area.

Kalamazoo style

Hot dogs from the Original Coney Island Restaurant and Bar in St. Paul, Minnesota

Coney Island Kalamazoo was founded in 1915, and is the longest continuously operated Coney Island in the state. Their coney island is made up of a topping made from their own recipe served on a Koegel’s Skinless Frankfurter. Koegel’s wasn’t founded until 1916, and it’s unknown which hot dog Coney Island Kalamazoo used prior to the Skinless Frankfurter’s development.

Minnesota

Hot dogs from the Original Coney Island Restaurant and Bar in St. Paul, Minnesota
Greek immigrant Gus Saites opened his Original Coney Island in Duluth in 1921. The hot dog used is the Vienna Beef from Chicago, which is topped with the restaurant’s own coney sauce, with options of mustard, onion, and for a small fee, cheese. The Superior Street location also offers sport peppers as a topping. The decor includes a copy of their 1959 menu showing coney islands were 25 cents each.

The Original Coney Island Restaurant and Bar, operated by the Arvanitis Family since 1923 in a former Civil War armory, is the oldest remaining business in St. Paul, though now open only on special occasions.

North Dakota
In Grand Forks, North Dakota the three location Red Pepper taco chain (including one in Fargo, North Dakota) offer their Coney Dogg (spelled with two ‘g’s). The hot dog is relatively large at 4.0 ounces (110 g). It’s topped with a ground beef-based topping known as a “mexi meat” which, unlike most coney island toppings, is a thick and mildly sweet Mexican chili. It’s then finished with a pile of finely-shredded Colby cheese.

Ohio

Cheese coneys Cincinnati

In Cincinnati, a “coney” is a hot dog topped with Cincinnati chili, usually with mustard and chopped onions. A “cheese coney” adds a final topping of shredded cheddar cheese. The dish was developed by Macedonian immigrants Tom and John Kardjieff, founders of Empress Chili, in 1922. The coney topping is also used as a topping for spaghetti, a dish called a “two-way” or chili spaghetti. As of 2013 there were over 250 “chili parlors” in Cincinnati serving coneys. The two largest chains today are Skyline Chili and Gold Star Chili. Arguably the most famous is Camp Washington Chili, which is called out by Jane and Michael Stern as their top pick in Cincinnati.

Tony Packo’s Cafe in Toledo, OH serves their own style of coney dog, the “Hungarian dog.” This was made famous on the television show MASH. It is actually not made with a hot dog, but half of a Hungarian sausage.

Oklahoma
Coneys are on restaurant menus throughout Tulsa and were originally created there by Greek immigrants. Jane and Michael Stern write that “Oklahoma is especially rich in classic coneys” and call out the Coney I-Lander, writing they “perfectly deliver the cheap-eats ecstasy that is the Coney’s soul.”Oklahoma coneys are small hot dogs on steamed buns with a spicy-sweet dark brown chili sauce, onions, and optional cheese and hot sauce.

Texas
James Coney Island operates a number of locations in the area of Houston, Texas. The company was founded in 1923 by two Greek immigrant brothers, James and Tom Papadakis; the former being the company’s namesake. The town of Grand Prairie in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex also has a Michigan-style Coney Island restaurant, D-Town Coney Island, which serves both the Detroit and Flint-style coneys.

 

Happy National Chili Dog Day!

July 30, 2015 at 3:55 PM | Posted in cheese, chili | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Today (Thu 30th Jul, 2015) is…
Chili Dog Daycheese coneys 001

 

 

A day to celebrate one of America’s favorite foods, Chili Dog Day is dedicated to the humble chili hot dog.

 

 

Today is National Chili Dog Day! July is also National Hot Dog Month! According to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council, Americans are expected to eat 7 billion hot dogs from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

One of America’s Favorites – Oyster Crackers

August 11, 2014 at 5:28 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
An individual serving package of oyster crackers

An individual serving package of oyster crackers

A must have food staple in all the Cincinnati Chili restaurants, the Oyster Cracker! Here in Cincinnati we top our Chili Spaghetti and Cheese Coneys with them or just eat them with a drop of hot sauce on them. We love our Oyster Crackers around here!

 

 

Oyster crackers are small, salted crackers, typically rounds about 0.59 in (15 mm) in diameter, although a slightly smaller hexagonal variety is also prevalent. They are served with oyster stew, but oyster crackers do not contain oysters. They are similar to saltines crackers.

 

 

Oyster crackers are popular in the northeastern United States, where they are served as an accompaniment to soup, and in the Cincinnati area, where they are frequently served with the city’s distinctive chili. In New England, oyster crackers are served in oyster stew and chowder. Additionally, plain oyster crackers are sometimes seasoned with spices. They usually have a taste similar to saltines crackers, but far less salty. In other areas of the United States, they are among the choices for crackers with soup. They are often available in single serving packages for restaurant use.

Many different companies produce oyster crackers with different combinations of shortenings and other ingredients, but retaining the same general shape and size.

 

 

The origin of the term “oyster cracker” is unclear, but it may be that they were originally served with oyster stew or clam chowder or merely that they look like an oyster in its shell. According to the web site of the still-extant bakery discussed below, the crackers were so named because they were commonly served with oyster stew and other oyster dishes (at least on their early packages). Other names include “water cracker,” “Philadelphia cracker,” and “Trenton cracker”.
The Westminster Cracker Company of Rutland, Vermont, has been making oyster crackers since 1828. But Adam Exton is credited for inventing the oyster cracker.

 

 

Adam Exton, the baker of Trenton, New Jersey, emigrated to America from Lancashire, England, in 1842. In Trenton, Exton opened a cake and cracker bakery with his brother-in-law, Richard Aspden, in 1846. Although Aspden died the following year, Exton continued with the bakery (the “Exton Cracker Bakery” or “Adam Exton & Co.”). He invented a machine that rolled and docked pastry and solved the sanitary problems of hand-rolling crackers.

 

 

The history of the oyster cracker was related by Exton’s nephew, also named Adam Exton, in the Trenton Evening Times Newspaper on May 31, 1917:

Even a cracker has a history. The past, present and future of the little disc of baked dough with “Exton” stamped across the face of it was discussed by Rotarian Adam Exton, of the Exton Cracker Company, at the weekly meeting of Trenton Rotary Club held this afternoon at Hildebrecht’s… Manufacture of the Exton oyster cracker was started in Trenton, in the same location now occupied by the company’s factory of Center Street, in 1877. Adam Exton, uncle of the speaker, was the originator of the oyster cracker. At the outset the factory had an output of 100 pounds of crackers a day, 36 of them to a pound, making a daily capacity of 3,600 crackers.

Oyster crackers became popular and around 1848, one can find the first advertisements of merchants selling oyster crackers.

 

 

 

Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys

June 20, 2014 at 5:09 PM | Posted in Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Sargento's Cheese, Skyline Chili | 3 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys

 

 

Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys 003
The high humidity continued today outside, a couple of showers and in the high 80’s. Went to my Family Doctor today for a check-up, blood work for sugar, cholesterol, and such. I was in my wheelchair heading in to the examination area and as I was going in the door the front wheel came flying off throwing me forward onto the floor. A nut on the axle had come off causing the wheel to come off. Luckily nothing was broke, but my right wrist has a slight sprain and my knee has a bruise. Could have been worse I guess. Came home and repaired the wheel, I need a new one but just don’t have the money right now. Enough excitement on to dinner! Tonight it’s Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys.

 

 

 

Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys 001
I used the Jennie – O Turkey Franks. I boiled them, it took about 5 minutes and they were ready. I opened up a can of Skyline Original Chili and heated that up for my Chili Topping. I served everything on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Hot Dog Bun. Then for my toppings I used the Skyline Chili, French’s Yellow Mustard, and Sargento Reduced Fat Sharp Cheddar Shredded Cheese. Put it altogether and you have a prime example of the World Famous Cincinnati Style Cheese Coney! Had a small side of some Marinated Olives along with a Diet Dr. Pepper that I had let chill in the freezer for about 15 minutes. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Mousse.

 

 

 

 

Jennie O Turkey Franks

Jennie – O Turkey Franks
A 100 percent turkey frank with natural smoke flavoring and 40 percent less fat than USDA data for beef franks.
Find this product in the refrigerated section of your grocery store.
Product Features:
40% less fat than USDA data for beef franks
Gluten Free
12-oz package
Nutritional Information
Serving Size 34 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 70 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 45 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 4 g
Saturated Fat 1.5 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 25 mg Iron 2%
Sodium 300 mg Calcium 2%
Ingredients
MECHANICALLY SEPARATED TURKEY, WATER, SALT, CONTAINS 2% OR LESS MODIFIED FOOD STARCH, POTASSIUM LACTATE, SEASONING (CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, DEXTROSE, SUGAR, PAPRIKA, SODIUM ERYTHORBATE, SPICE EXTRACTIVES), SODIUM DIACETATE, NATURAL SMOKE FLAVORING, SODIUM NITRITE. NO GLUTEN.

 
– See more at: http://www.jennieo.com/products/72-Turkey-Franks#sthash.QvpNuYUF.dpuf

Chili and Cheese Coneys!

May 17, 2014 at 5:31 PM | Posted in chili, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Hormel, Oscar Mayer, Sargento's Cheese | 3 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Chili and Cheese Coneys!

 

Chili and Cheese Coneys 008
Only about 40 degrees this morning, Spring time? The high for the day wasn’t much higher and there was a cold breeze blowing all day. But 70’s and 80’s coming the upcoming week. Ran Mom around for a few errands and home. For dinner tonight, nothing but comfort food! Tonight it’s Chili and Cheese Coneys!

 

 

 

 

I used Oscar Mayer Extra Lean Turkey Franks. Just boiled them for 5 minutes and they were ready. A very lean Hot Dog, only 50 calories and 4 carbs per Hot Dog. Then for the Chili I used Hormel Turkey Chili with Beans. One of the best canned Chilis there is, in my opinion. It’s a nice thick Chili and seasoned just right with plenty of Beans. Emptied the can into a small sauce pan and heated it up for about 10 minutes or so. I did add a few shakes of Frank’s Red Hot Sauce to the Chili as it was heating up.

 

 

Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread 001

Served everything on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Hot Dog Bun. Topped the Dog with French’s Yellow Mustard, Sargento Reduced Fat Shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese, and then the Chili and they were ready to go! Nothing better than a couple of Cincinnati Style Chili and Cheese Coneys for dinner! For dessert later, I had baked some Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread. Instead of adding 2 Eggs to the batter I used Egg Beaters, 2 Eggs (Medium size) is 140 calories while 2 servings of Egg Beaters is only 50 calories. So I’ll have a slice of the Nut Quick Bread topped with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Bean Ice Cream.

 

 

 

 

 
Oscar Mayer Extra Lean Turkey FranksOscar Mayer Extra Lean Turkey Franks

 

These hardwood smoked, bun length turkey franks are 95% fat free and only 50 calories per serving. Enjoy this lean poultry option the next time you’re looking for a hot dog, but without all the fat and calories of a beef frank.

Ingredients: TURKEY INGREDIENTS (TURKEY, MECHANICALLY SEPARATED TURKEY), WATER, MODIFIED CORN STARCH, CORN SYRUP, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF DEXTROSE, POTASSIUM CHLORIDE, FLAVOR, HYDROLYZED BEEF STOCK, SODIUM PHOSPHATES, SALT, SODIUM PROPIONATE, MUSTARD FLOUR, SODIUM DIACETATE, SODIUM BENZOATE, LEMON JUICE SOLIDS, SODIUM ASCORBATE, EXTRACTIVES OF PAPRIKA, SODIUM NITRITE.

 

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 50g Servings per Container about 8 Amount Per Serving
Calories 50 Calories from Fat 20
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2.5g 4 % Saturated Fat 0.5g 3 % Trans Fat 0g 0 % Cholesterol 20mg 7 % Sodium 400mg 17 % Total Carbohydrate 4g 1 % Dietary Fiber 0g 0 % Sugars 1g Protein 5g

 
http://www.kraftbrands.com/oscarmayer/hot-dogs/extra-lean-franks.html

 

 

 

 

 

Hormel Turkey Chili with BeansHormel Turkey Chili w Beans

 

Hormel Chili, Turkey with Beans, 99% Fat Free Always easy and always delicious, Hormel® chili is made with carefully selected beef, red beans, tomatoes and a special combination of spices. Our choice ingredients are blended and simmered, resulting in a rich and hearty flavor—perfect for dips, baked potatoes, hamburgers, casseroles, nachos, hot dogs, French fries and so much more. Hormel® chili now comes in 10 varieties and sizes, including a less sodium variety. Whether you serve it in a bowl, on a hot dog, or as a topping for fries and nachos, choose the chili craved by chili lovers—Hormel® chili.

 

 

NUTRITION FACTS Serving size 1 cup

Value My Daily Value Calories 210 cal Total Fat 3 g Saturated Fat 1 g Trans Fat 0 g Cholesterol 45 mg Sodium 1200 mg Total Carbohydrate 28 g Dietary Fiber 6 g Sugars 6 g Protein 17 g

 

 

http://www.hormelfoods.com/Brands/BrandWall/Hormel-chili

Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys w/ Baked Fries

March 22, 2014 at 5:22 PM | Posted in chili, Hot Dogs, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ore - Ida, Sargento's Cheese, Skyline Chili | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys w/ Baked Fries

 

 

 

Jen O Turkey Franks Chili Dogs 009
About 12 degrees cooler today than yesterday. They’re calling for a high in low 30’s Monday through Thursday next week, with snow flurries! Spent the afternoon at rehab visiting my Dad. He’s not looking real good at all, he’s still just so weak and they found more fluid on his lugs. I hope he pulls through this one. Mom had dinner with my Dad tonight so I was cooking for one. Tonight one of my favorites, Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys! I prepared Jennie – O Turkey Frank Cincinnati Style Cheese Coneys w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 
I used my new favorite Turkey Dogs, the Jennie – O Turkey Franks. These cook up great, I’ve steamed and boiled them and can’t wait to get a grill and grill them. I boiled these, it took about 5 minutes and they were ready. I opened up a can of Skyline Original Chili and heated that up for my Chili Topping. I served everything on a Aunt Millie’s Reduced Calorie Hot Dog Bun. Then for my toppings I used the Skyline Chili, French’s Yellow Mustard, and Sargento Reduced Fat Sharp Cheddar Shredded Cheese. Put it altogether and you have a prime example of the Cincinnati Style Cheese Coney! These are just like the Lay’s Potato Chips, “You Just Can’t Eat One”. I served the Cheese Coneys with Baked Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries. Had a side of Hunt’s Ketchup for dipping the Fries and an ice-cold Diet Dr. Pepper that I sat in the freezer for about 15 minutes, too good! For dessert/snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.

 

 

 

 

Jennie O Turkey Franks
Jennie – O Turkey Franks

 

A 100 percent turkey frank with natural smoke flavoring and 40 percent less fat than USDA data for beef franks.
Find this product in the refrigerated section of your grocery store.
Product Features:
40% less fat than USDA data for beef franks
Gluten Free
12-oz package
Nutritional Information
Serving Size 34 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 70 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 45 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 4 g
Saturated Fat 1.5 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 25 mg Iron 2%
Sodium 300 mg Calcium 2%
Ingredients
MECHANICALLY SEPARATED TURKEY, WATER, SALT, CONTAINS 2% OR LESS MODIFIED FOOD STARCH, POTASSIUM LACTATE, SEASONING (CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, DEXTROSE, SUGAR, PAPRIKA, SODIUM ERYTHORBATE, SPICE EXTRACTIVES), SODIUM DIACETATE, NATURAL SMOKE FLAVORING, SODIUM NITRITE. NO GLUTEN.

 
– See more at: http://www.jennieo.com/products/72-Turkey-Franks#sthash.QvpNuYUF.dpuf

 

 

 

Ore Ida Simply

Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries

 

You can take the potatoes out of the country.
But you can’t take the country out of our delicious Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries. Simple ingredients like potatoes, olive oil and sea salt – simply prepared. That’s Ore-Ida style.

Ore-Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries:

* French fried potatoes seasoned with cracked black pepper, olive oil and sea salt
* All natural
* Made with Grade A potatoes
* 0 grams trans fat per serving
* Gluten free
* Kosher
SERVING SIZE: 84g
CALS 130
FAT 4 1/2g
SODIUM 290mg
CARBS 22g

 

 

http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/S/Simply-Olive-Oil-and-Sea-Salt-Country-Style-Fries#.UhecmRvOk20

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Tinieyes

What an Interesting World

~ Foodie with a Passion ~

The world of food and nutrition by a Dietitian who just happens to be a Foodie

Aldis Ferlach O'Peigh

Telling Tall Tales

EAT it NOW or EAT it LATER

my belly is so FULL!

Zest For Cooking

I love to cook and share my love of food!

Quaint Cooking

For the love of the vintage kitchen

The Short (Dis)Order(ed) Cook

Just a short, anxious woman who likes making a mess in the kitchen

Feasting on Veggies

Healthy eating after breast cancer

MealTrips

Get your cravings anytime

All Fall Y'all

All Fall. All year round.

Cassie's Kitchen

mostly healthy, always tasty

Memories and Such

Memories of a very ordinary life

Welsh Girl Foodie

Welsh Girl living in Scotland who loves to cook and eat!

Megan's kitchen recipes

Random food recipes I've found online

Mustard With Mutton

DIARY OF A GLUTTON

Lite Cravings

A Healthy Approach to Indulgence

The Southern Search

Finding out where food comes from, one southern staple at a time.