It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Country French Barley Vegetable Potage

February 1, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | 2 Comments
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday is a recipe for a Country French Barley Vegetable Potage. To make this week’s dish you’ll need; Low-Sodium and Fat-Free Beef Bouillon Powder, Pearled Barley, Garlic, Leek, Carrot, Celery, Mushrooms, Herbes de Provence, and Black Pepper. The Potage is only 63 calories and 11 net carbs per serving (1 cup). The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Country French Barley Vegetable Potage
Ingredients
Preparation time: 20 minutes

6 cups water
1 tablespoon low-sodium, fat-free beef bouillon powder
1/2 cup pearled barley
Vegetable cooking spray
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup sliced leek
1 cup sliced fresh carrot
1 cup sliced celery
2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
1 teaspoon herbes de Provence
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
Yield: 8 cups
Serving size: 1 cup

* In a large pot, combine 3 cups of the water with the beef bouillon powder and pearled barley. Bring to a boil and cover. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes, until barley is softened. Meanwhile, coat a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray and heat over medium heat. Sauté garlic, leek, carrot, and celery until crisp-tender. Stir in mushrooms and continue to sauté until mushrooms are tender. Set aside until barley is softened. Add sautéed vegetables to large pot with barley and additional 3 cups water, herbes de Provence, and black pepper. Cook an additional 20–30 minutes until vegetables are tender and the consistency is thickened slightly. (You may need to replace some water lost by evaporation—this recipe should make 2 quarts of soup.)

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 63 calories, Carbohydrates: 14 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 0 g, Saturated Fat: 0 g, Sodium: 54 mg, Fiber: 3 g

Exchanges per serving: 1/2 starch, 1 vegetable. Carbohydrate choices: 1.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/country-french-barley-vegetable-potage/

 


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One of America’s Favorites – Buffalo Wings MONDAY

January 27, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Buffalo wings with blue cheese dressing

A Buffalo wing, in the cuisine of the United States, is an unbreaded chicken wing section (flat or drumette) that is generally deep-fried then coated and/or dipped in a sauce consisting of a vinegar-based cayenne pepper hot sauce and melted butter prior to serving. The Buffalo wing was invented in 1964 at Anchor Bar in Buffalo, New York by Teressa Bellissimo. They are generally served hot, along with celery sticks and/or carrot sticks with blue cheese dressing for dipping.

Buffalo wings have gained in popularity in the United States and abroad, with some North American restaurant chains featuring them as a main menu item. The name “Buffalo” is now also applied to other spiced fried foods served with dipping sauces, including boneless chicken “fingers”, chicken fries, chicken nuggets, popcorn chicken, and shrimp. It also describes other dishes, such as pizza, that are seasoned with the Buffalo-style sauce or a Buffalo flavor seasoning.

There are several different claims about the invention of Buffalo wings. One of the claims is that Buffalo wings were first prepared at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, New York, by Teressa Bellissimo, who owned the bar with husband Frank in 1964. At the time chicken wings were inexpensive and undesirable, primarily being used for stock or soup.

Several versions of the story of the invention of the Buffalo wing have been circulated by the Bellissimo family and others including:

* Upon the unannounced, late-night arrival of their son, Dominic, with several of his friends from college, Teressa needed a fast and easy snack to present to her guests. It was then that she came up with the idea of deep frying chicken wings (normally thrown away or reserved for stock) and tossing them in cayenne hot sauce.
* Dominic Bellissimo (Frank and Teressa’s son) told The New Yorker reporter Calvin Trillin in 1980: “It was Friday night in the bar and since people were buying a lot of drinks he wanted to do something nice for them at midnight when the mostly Catholic patrons would be able to eat meat again.” He stated that it was his mother, Teressa, who came up with the idea of chicken wings.
* There was mis-delivery of wings instead of backs and necks for making the bar’s spaghetti sauce. Faced with this unexpected resource, Frank Bellissimo says that he asked Teressa to do something with them.
Although an article published about the Anchor Bar in a local newspaper during 1969 does not mention Buffalo wings, a local competitor of the Anchor Bar, Duff’s Famous Wings, began selling Buffalo wings in that year.

A cook preparing Buffalo wings

* Another claim is that a man named John Young, who moved to Buffalo from Alabama in 1948, began serving uncut chicken wings that were breaded, deep fried and served in his own special tomato based “Mambo Sauce” at his Buffalo restaurant beginning in 1964. Prior to opening his restaurant he had a conversation with a boxer who traveled and in a later interview Mr. Young recalled: “He told me that there was a restaurant in Washington, D.C. that was doing a good business with wings and I decided to specialize”. In the same interview Young stated that the Anchor Bar didn’t offer Buffalo wings as a regular menu item until 1974. He registered the name of his restaurant, John Young’s Wings ‘n Things, at the county courthouse before leaving the Buffalo area in 1970. In 2013, at the National Buffalo Wing Festival, held in Buffalo, New York, John Young’s contributions were acknowledged when he was inducted into the festival’s National Buffalo Wing Hall of Flame.

In 1977 the city of Buffalo issued an official proclamation celebrating Anchor Bar co-owner Frank Bellissimo declared July 29, 1977 to be Chicken Wing Day. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s Buffalo wings gained in popularity as a bar food and appetizer across the United States and Canada. Large franchises specializing in Buffalo wings have emerged, notably Buffalo Wild Wings founded in 1982 and Hooter’s in 1983. McDonald’s began selling Mighty Wings as an optional item in 1990 at their restaurant locations in the United States. In 1994, following four Super Bowl appearances by the Buffalo Bills football team, the Domino’s pizza chain added Buffalo wings to their national menu, followed by Pizza Hut the next year.

As the market for chicken wings became larger, restaurants began to create and use a variety of sauces in addition to buffalo sauce. Some of these new chicken wing sauces were influenced by Chinese, Japanese, Thai, Caribbean, and Indian cuisines. Other flavors created by restaurants include unique combinations, such as Blueberry BBQ Wing Sauce and Maple/Bacon Glaze for example, to help keep customer interest and grow their businesses. Because of the increased cost in the price of chicken wings, and a desire by some diners for a neater eating experience, restaurants began to offer a menu item called “boneless wings,” sometimes marketed under the name wyngz. Boneless wings are essentially small pieces of skinless, boneless chicken breast that are coated in flour and spices then fried or baked. They are usually coated in or served with similar sauces as chicken wings. The growth of popularity in recent years in Buffalo wing consumption and restaurants serving wings have led to actual and perceived shortages of chicken wings in the United States during certain times.

Roasted Chicken Wings

In many areas of the United States chicken wing festivals are held with Buffalo wings being used in competitive eating events, such as at Philadelphia’s Wing Bowl and the National Buffalo Wing Festival. It has also become commonplace for restaurants to offer a wing eating contest featuring a customer eating a certain number of wings, coated in their hottest sauce during a set period of time. Many bars and restaurants intentionally create an extra-hot sauce for this purpose, and customers are usually rewarded with their picture posted on the restaurant’s wall or website, a commemorative T-shirt, a free meal or a combination of rewards for successfully completing the challenge.

Chicken
The chicken wings used for Buffalo wings are usually segmented into three parts with the end section of the wing, called the flapper or pointer, being discarded. Typically, the wings are deep-fried in oil, without breading or flour until they are well browned. Alternatively, they may be baked, grilled, or broiled.

Sauce
Cayenne pepper, hot sauce and melted butter or margarine are the base of the Buffalo wing sauce, which may be made mild, medium, or hot. Commercial ready-to-use wing sauce is made with varying levels of spiciness. The cooked chicken wings are placed in a bowl or pot and shaken to coat the wings completely covering them in sauce before serving.

Service
Traditionally, Buffalo wings are usually served with small sticks of celery and blue cheese dipping sauce on the side. sliced carrots or whole baby carrots are often served with buffalo wings rather than the usual sides.

 

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Wild Rice Soup

January 18, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday, rice, Soups | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday is a recipe for Wild Rice Soup. I love Wild Rice and here’s the perfect recipe to use for Wild Rice, Wild Rice Soup. Made using Olive Oil, Onion, Celery, Carrots, Flour, Reduced Sodium Chicken Broth, Wild Rice, Ham, Almonds, Turmeric, Skim Milk, and Dry White Table Wine. Put it all together and the Soup is on! You can find this recipe at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News and more! You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Wild Rice Soup
Preparation time: 15 minutes. Cooking time: 1 hour, including rice cooking time.

Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup minced onion
1 cup minced celery
1 cup grated carrots
1/2 cup flour
4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
2 cups cooked wild rice*
1/3 cup ham, chopped
3 tablespoons chopped slivered almonds
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 cup evaporated skim milk
2 tablespoons dry white table wine

Directions
Heat the olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Sauté the onion, celery, and carrots until tender. Whisk the flour into the broth until there are no lumps. Add the broth to the sautéed vegetables and cook over medium to high heat, stirring constantly. Boil for one minute or until the mixture has thickened. Reduce heat and stir in rice, ham, almonds, and turmeric. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Add the evaporated skim milk and wine, then heat to desired serving temperature.

* To make 2 cups of cooked wild rice, combine 1/2 cup wild rice with 1 1/2 cups water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, stir once, then cover and simmer over low heat until the water is absorbed and the rice is fluffy, about 45 minutes.

Yield: 5 servings.

Serving size: about 1 1/2 cups.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 240 calories, Carbohydrates: 36 g, Protein: 12 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 5 mg, Sodium: 640 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/wild-rice-soup/

 

 

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One of America’s Favorites – Stuffing

December 16, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Stuffing a turkey

Stuffing, filling, or dressing is an edible mixture, normally consisting primarily of small cut-up pieces of bread or a similar starch and served as a side dish or used to fill a cavity in another food item while cooking. Many foods may be stuffed, including eggs, poultry, seafood, mammals, and vegetables, but chickens and turkey are the most common. Stuffing serves the dual purpose of helping to keep the meat moist while also adding to the mix of flavors of both the stuffing and the thing it is stuffed in.

Poultry stuffing often consists of dried breadcrumbs, onion, celery, salt, pepper, and other spices and herbs, a common herb being sage. Giblets are often used. Additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (such as apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.

It is not known when stuffings were first used. The earliest documentary evidence is the Roman cookbook, Apicius De Re Coquinaria, which contains recipes for stuffed chicken, dormouse, hare, and pig. Most of the stuffings described consist of vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts, and spelt (an old cereal), and frequently contain chopped liver, brains, and other organ meat.

Names for stuffing include “farce” (~1390), “stuffing” (1538), “forcemeat” (1688), and relatively more recently in the United States; “dressing” (1850).

Stuffed turkey

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of animals, including birds, fish, and mammals, various cuts of meat may be stuffed after they have been deboned or a pouch has been cut into them. Recipes include stuffed chicken legs, stuffed pork chops, stuffed breast of veal, as well as the traditional holiday stuffed turkey or goose.

Many types of vegetables are also suitable for stuffing, after their seeds or flesh has been removed. Tomatoes, capsicums (sweet or hot peppers), vegetable marrows (e.g., zucchini) may be prepared in this way. Cabbages and similar vegetables can also be stuffed or wrapped around a filling. They are usually blanched first, in order to make their leaves more pliable. Then, the interior may be replaced by stuffing, or small amounts of stuffing may be inserted between the individual leaves.

It is sometimes claimed that ancient Roman and medieval cooks stuffed animals with other animals. An anonymous Andalusian cookbook from the 13th century includes a recipe for a ram stuffed with small birds. A similar recipe for a camel stuffed with sheep stuffed with bustards stuffed with carp stuffed with eggs is mentioned in T.C. Boyle’s book Water Music.

British celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has championed the ten-bird roast, calling it “one of the most spectacular and delicious roasts you can lay before your loved ones at Yuletide”. A large turkey is stuffed with a goose, duck, mallard, guinea fowl, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon, and woodcock. The roast feeds approximately 30 people and, as well as the ten birds, includes stuffing made from two pounds of sausage meat and half a pound of streaky bacon, along with sage, and port and red wine.

In the United States and eastern Canada, multi-bird dishes are sometimes served on special occasions. See gooducken and turducken.

Stuffed orange pepper

Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination thereof. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, or forcemeat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes, and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Week!

December 1, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Healthy snacks……….

Many vegetables taste great with a dip or dressing. Try a low-fat salad dressing with raw broccoli, red and green peppers, celery sticks or cauliflower.

Kitchen closed tonight, Buffalo Wings and Rings

November 30, 2019 at 7:19 PM | Posted in chicken | Leave a comment
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Kitchen closed for Dinner tonight. I had some friends come into town and we went and watched some Football and had some Wings at Buffalo Wings and Rings. Great seeing some of my best friends! Kitchen will reopen tomorrow! Take care all!

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week -Turkey and Stuffing Roll-Ups

November 22, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Turkey and Stuffing Roll-Ups. Here’s a great recipe for those Holiday Leftovers, Turkey and Stuffing Roll-Ups. Made using JENNIE-O® Tender Browned Turkey Breast, Cubed Bread, Onions, Celery, Garlic, Low-Sodium Chicken Broth, Turkey Gravy, and Seasonings. Happy and Healthy Holidays ahead! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Jennie – O Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey and Stuffing Roll-Ups
When cooking with holiday leftovers, sometimes you need a little variety. These bite-sized roll-ups let you enjoy the best of Thanksgiving Dinner in one delicious bite at under 500 calories per serving, you won’t need a nap afterwards!

INGREDIENTS
2 cups dried cubed bread
½ cup chopped onions
½ cup chopped celery
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 tablespoons butter, melted
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
8 slices JENNIE-O® Tender Browned Turkey Breast, from the service deli
2 cups turkey gravy, warmed

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350°F. Grease 8-inch square baking pan; set aside. In large bowl, combine bread cubes, onion, celery, garlic, poultry seasoning, pepper and butter. Add broth and mix to moisten. Add to baking dish. Bake 30 to 40 minutes or until top is browned and crunchy.
2) Add stuffing to slices of turkey. Roll up turkey; secure with toothpicks. Top with warm gravy.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 400
Protein 25g
Carbohydrates 50g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 5g
Fat 13g
Cholesterol 45mg
Sodium 840mg
Saturated Fat 6g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/815-turkey-and-stuffing-roll-ups

Diabetic Dish of the Week -Turkey Mornay Casserole

November 19, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a Turkey Mornay Casserole. You can make this week’s recipe with fresh ingredients or it can be prepared with Thanksgiving Day Dinner Leftovers. Some of the ingredients you” be using are Onions, Celery, Button Mushrooms, Garbanzo Bean Flour, Mozzarella, Brown Rice, Shredded Turkey, Broccoli, and more! Perfect Casserole for the up coming Holidays! You can find this recipe at the Diabetes Self Management website. At the Diabetes Self Management site you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetes Friendly Recipes, Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News and so much more so be sure to check it out today. You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine, one of my favorites. I’ve left a link so you can subscribe at the end of the post. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Turkey Mornay Casserole
Thanksgiving is about tradition. It’s a time to give thanks, a time for family, friends, and food. Let’s talk leftovers with this gluten-free casserole. Turkey and vegetables or just vegetables rock the dish! Take your pick.

Ingredients
2 tbsp vegetable oil
1/2 cup diced onions
1/2 cup diced celery
1/8 + 1/2 tsp salt, divided
12 ounces sliced button or cremini mushrooms (approximately 5 cups)
6 tbsp soy-free buttery sticks, divided (4 tbsp + 2 tbsp)
1/4 cup garbanzo bean flour
1 cup alternative milk, such as rice milk
1 cup vegetable broth
4 ounces mozzarella style shreds
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/8 tsp white pepper
3 cups cooked brown rice
4 cups steamed broccoli, chopped
2 cups cooked turkey, shredded
1/2 cup gluten-free breadcrumbs

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium heat. Add onions, celery and dash salt. Cook 3 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook until soft, an additional 4-5 minutes. Set aside.

3. In a small saucepan, melt 4 tablespoons margarine over medium heat. Add flour and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly.

4. Add milk and broth. Whisk until smooth. Simmer 5 minutes, whisking.

5. Add cheeze. Cook an additional 5 minutes, whisking frequently.

6. Add nutmeg, pepper and salt to sauce. Set aside.

7. In a large bowl, combine rice, broccoli and turkey. Fold in the sauce and mushroom mixture.

8. Transfer mixture to a 2-quart casserole dish. Top with breadcrumbs. Cut the remaining 2 tablespoons cold margarine into small pieces. Sprinkle over the breadcrumbs.

9. Bake uncovered for approximately 25 minutes, until heated through and bubbling.

10. Place under broiler for a couple of minutes to brown crumbs.

Yield: Serves 6–8.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 741 calories, Carbohydrates: 94 grams, Protein: 32 grams, Fat: 26 grams, Saturated Fat: 11.7 grams, Cholesterol: 76 mg, Sodium: 470 mg, Fiber: 6.8 grams
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/turkey-mornay-casserole/

 

 

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It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Idaho® Potato and Chicken Gumbo

November 9, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday is a recipe for Idaho® Potato and Chicken Gumbo. To make this delicious dish you’ll need; Brown Roux (recipe included), Idaho Potatoes, Yellow Onion, Peppers, Celery, Garlic, Pulled Cook Chicken, and Creole Seasoning. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website where you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes, diets, and cuisines. So be sure to check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Idaho® Potato and Chicken Gumbo

Recipe Ingredients:
6 tablespoons Brown Roux (recipe follows)
1 1/2 cups Idaho® potatoes, peeled and shredded
1 cup diced yellow onion
1 cup diced yellow, red and green peppers
1 cup diced celery
1 tablespoon minced garlic
2 pounds cooked chicken meat, pulled (shredded)
2 tablespoons Creole seasoning (recipe follows)

8 cups Idaho® potatoes, cubed and sautéed for accompaniment

Brown Roux:
8 ounces (1 cup) butter
8 ounces (2 cups) all-purpose flour

Creole Seasoning:
2 tablespoons paprika
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon dried basil

Cooking Directions:
1 – For Gumbo: In a large stockpot, bring the chicken stock to a boil. Temper approximately 6 tablespoons of Brown Roux into the broth (add 1/2 cup of hot broth to the roux and mix completely. Add the broth and roux mixture back into the boiling broth and whisk).
2 – Add potato. Simmer for 12 minutes. Add the onion, peppers, celery, garlic, and chicken pieces.
3 – Add Creole seasoning. Taste and adjust seasoning, if desired. Continue to cook for another 10 minutes (the vegetables should be cooked, but still firm).
4 – To Serve: Ladle gumbo over sautéed potatoes.
5 – For Oven Method Brown Roux: Slowly brown the flour on a sheet pan at 300°F (150°C) about 20 to 30 minutes. Stir the mixture halfway through (about 10 to 15 minutes) to achieve an even browning. The flour should be a light khaki color and will smell like roasted nuts.
6 – For Stovetop Method Brown Roux: Cook the flour and the butter over medium-high heat until a brown, smooth consistency occurs (about 5 to 6 minutes). Once the roux has cooled, cover and leave unrefrigerated until needed. Later, if any oil has separated from the roux, simply stir the oil into the mixture.
7 – For Creole Seasoning: Combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly. May be stored in a tightly covered container. Makes 1/4 cup.

Makes 10 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/soup/idaho_potato_and_chicken_gumbo_recipe.html

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Vegetable-Chicken Noodle Soup

October 12, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday Recipe is Vegetable-Chicken Noodle Soup. Made using Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast, Celery, Leeks, Carrots, Turnips, Fat-Free Reduced-Sodium Chicken Broth, Yolk-Free Wide Noodles, and Herbs and Spices. One Hearty Soup! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll also find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, and Diabetes Management Tips. You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine while at the site. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Make 2019 aHappy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Vegetable-Chicken Noodle Soup
Ingredients
1 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup thinly sliced leek (white part only)
1/2 cup chopped carrot
1/2 cup chopped turnip
6 cups fat-free reduced-sodium chicken broth, divided
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
1 1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary leaves or 1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 ounces uncooked yolk-free wide noodles
1 cup boneless skinless chicken breast, cooked and diced

Directions
1 – Combine celery, leek, carrot, turnip, and 1/3 cup chicken broth in large saucepan. Cover; cook over medium heat 12 to 15 minutes or until vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally.

2 – Stir in remaining 5 2/3 cups broth, parsley, thyme, rosemary, vinegar, and pepper; bring to a boil. Add noodles; cook until noodles are tender.

3 – Stir in chicken. Reduce heat to medium; simmer until heated through.

Yield: 6 servings.

Serving size: about 1 cup soup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 98 calories, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Protein: 10 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 18 mg, Sodium: 73 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/vegetable-chicken-noodle-soup/

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Diabetes Self-Management offers up-to-date, practical “how-to” information on nutrition, exercise, new drugs, medical advances, self-help, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.
Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

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