One of America’s Favorites – Chimichanga

April 26, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Chimichanga

A chimichanga is a deep-fried burrito that is common in Tex-Mex and other Southwestern U.S. cuisine. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with various ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, beans, and a meat such as machaca (dried meat), carne adobada (marinated meat), carne seca (dried beef), or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried, and can be accompanied by salsa, guacamole, sour cream, or carne asada.

The origin of the chimichanga is uncertain. By some accounts, it originated in Mexico, in others, by accident in Arizona, United States. Given the variant chivichanga, specifically employed in Mexico, one derivation indicated that immigrants to the United States brought the dish with them, mainly through Sonora into Arizona. The words chimi and changa come from two Mexican Spanish terms: chamuscado (past participle of the verb chamuscar), which means seared or singed, and changa, related to chinga (third-person present tense form of the vulgar verb chingar, a rude expression for the unexpected or a small insult.

One of America’s Favorites – Chimichanga

A chimichanga is a deep-fried burrito that is common in Tex-Mex and other Southwestern U.S. cuisine. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with various ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, beans, and a meat such as machaca (dried meat), carne adobada (marinated meat), carne seca (dried beef), or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried, and can be accompanied by salsa, guacamole, sour cream, or carne asada.

Chimichanga from Amigos in Melbourne, Australia.

The origin of the chimichanga is uncertain. By some accounts, it originated in Mexico, in others, by accident in Arizona, United States. Given the variant chivichanga, specifically employed in Mexico, one derivation indicated that immigrants to the United States brought the dish with them, mainly through Sonora into Arizona. The words chimi and changa come from two Mexican Spanish terms: chamuscado (past participle of the verb chamuscar), which means seared or singed, and changa, related to chinga (third-person present tense form of the vulgar verb chingar), a rude expression for the unexpected or a small insult.

According to one source, Monica Flin, the founder of the Tucson, Arizona, restaurant El Charro, accidentally dropped a burrito into the deep-fat fryer in 1922. She immediately began to utter a Spanish profanity beginning “chi…” (chingada), but quickly stopped herself and instead exclaimed chimichanga, a Spanish equivalent of “thingamajig”. Knowledge and appreciation of the dish spread slowly outward from the Tucson area, with popularity elsewhere accelerating in recent decades. Though the chimichanga is now found as part of the Tex-Mex cuisine, its roots within the U.S. are mainly in Tucson, Arizona.

Woody Johnson, founder of Macayo’s Mexican Kitchen, claimed he had invented the chimichanga in 1946 when he put some burritos into a deep fryer as an experiment at his original restaurant Woody’s El Nido, in Phoenix, Arizona. These “fried burritos” became so popular that by 1952, when Woody’s El Nido became Macayo’s, the chimichanga was one of the restaurant’s main menu items. Johnson opened Macayo’s in 1952. Although no official records indicate when the dish first appeared, retired University of Arizona folklorist Jim Griffith recalls seeing chimichangas at the Yaqui Old Pascua Village in Tucson in the mid-1950s.

According to data presented by the United States Department of Agriculture, a typical 183-gram (6.5-ounce) serving of a beef and cheese chimichanga contains 443 calories, 20 grams protein, 39 grams carbohydrates, 23 grams total fat, 11 grams saturated fat, 51 milligrams cholesterol, and 957 milligrams of sodium.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Chuck Roast Stewed with Garden Tomatoes and Green Beans

October 9, 2013 at 11:04 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Time for this weeks Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week, Buffalo Chuck Roast Stewed with Garden Tomatoes and Green Beans. You can check all of Jill O’Brien’s recipes by going to the Wild Idea Buffalo website!

 

 

Buffalo Chuck Roast Stewed with Garden Tomatoes and Green BeansWild Idea Buffalo Stewed Buffalo Chuck Roast
By: Jill O’Brien

 

Buffalo Chuck Roast Stewed with Garden Tomatoes and Green Beans (serves 6 to 8)

A great family dinner that says goodbye to summer and hello to fall! Recipe by Jill, but prepared by Dan with easy Crockpot cooking instructions!

 

1 – 3 pound chuck roast
1 – tablespoon olive oil
2 – teaspoons salt
1 – tablespoon pepper
2 – teaspoon thyme
2 – teaspoon basil
2 – teaspoon oregano
1 – onion, cut into wedges
2 – pounds tomatoes, 2/3 diced, 1/3 quartered
4 – cloves garlic, coarse chopped
4 – cups vegetable stock
1 – pound fresh green beans, washed and clipped

 

Stewed Buffalo Chuck Roast
1.) Preheat crock pot to high setting.
2.) Rinse and pat dry Buffalo Chuck Roast, leaving netting on.
3.) Rub with, 1 tablespoon olive oil and season with salt, pepper and seasonings.
4.) Place onions in the bottom of crock pot, place buffalo roast on top of onions and cover with diced tomatoes and garlic.
5.) Add two 4 cups vegetable stock.
6.) Seal crock pot and cover with foil and a heavy towel. *I think this helps keep the heat in. Allow to cook on high for 1 hour.
7.) After 1 hour reduce heat to medium to medium low (depending on your crock pot) and set for 6 hours.
8.) Turn crock pot to medium high again, and turn buffalo chuck roast. Add quartered tomatoes and fresh green beans. Pushing beans into juices. Cover and allow too cook for 15 to 30 minutes, based on how you like your green beans.
9.) Remove buffalo roast and place on platter. Using a knife, cut netting away. Slice or pull apart into desired portions. Remove Green beans and place around roast, pouring stewed tomatoes over all. Season with finishing salt.
Garnish with fresh herbs and pass with baked potatoes, wild rice or couscous.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2013/buffalo-chuck-roast-stewed-with-garden-tomatoes-and-green-beans/

 

 

 

 

3 lbs. Chuck RoastWild idea Buffalo Chuck Roast
This versatile roast is loaded with flavor making it a regular on the dinner table at the Cheyenne River Ranch. Best when braised. Great for pot roasts, BBQ, or Carne Asada. 3 lbs.

 
http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/products/3-lbs-chuck-roast

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Maisie Edwards-Mowforth

Healthy Food and Cosy Times

Wiredgypsy's Diary

Life, Thoughts, Cultures, Food, Travel, Coffee, Taste Enthusiast

goodmotherdiet

It's not what you think...

Corner of Well-Being

Spiritual | Mental | Physical | Emotional | Social

Allie Carte Dishes

reinventing your favorite a la carte dishes

The Best Chicken Recipe.com

Yeah, we're crazy about chicken.

Sharing the passion for cooking!

Life is meant for Good Food, Good Friends & Great Adventures

Bonnie's GF Bakery

Specializing in Glutenfree bakes

Fun Cooking Station

Homemade food made with love

Collectiveness

Random thoughts of mine.

The Quirk and the Cool

Thoughts and conversation about food, and other interests, being shared from beautiful Sydney, Australia.

SO MUCH FOOD

Approachable and exciting recipes for the adventurous home cook!

Moss En Place

Vegetable forward, feel good food