Lunch Meat of the Week – Capocollo

November 29, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Lunch Meat of the Week | 2 Comments
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Capocollo

Capocollo (Italian pronunciation: [kapoˈkɔllo]), coppa ([ˈkoppa]), or capicola is a traditional Italian and Corsican pork cold cut (salume) made from the dry-cured muscle running from the neck to the fourth or fifth rib of the pork shoulder or neck. It is a whole-muscle salume, dry cured, and typically sliced very thin. It is similar to the more widely known cured ham or prosciutto, because they are both pork-derived cold-cuts used in similar dishes. However, it is not brined as ham typically is.

In its production, capocollo is first lightly seasoned often with red and sometimes white wine, garlic, and a variety of herbs and spices that differs depending on region. The meat is then salted (and was traditionally massaged) and stuffed into a natural casing, and hung for up to six months to cure. Sometimes the exterior is rubbed with hot paprika before being hung and cured. Capocollo is essentially the pork counterpart of the air-dried, cured beef bresaola. It is widely available wherever significant Italian communities occur, due to commercially produced varieties. The slow-roasted Piedmontese version is called coppa cotta.

Capocollo is esteemed for its delicate flavor and tender, fatty texture, and is often more expensive than most other salumi. In many countries, it is often sold as a gourmet food item. It is usually sliced thin for use in antipasto or sandwiches such as muffulettas, Italian grinders and subs, and panini’ as well as some traditional Italian pizza.

Two particular varieties, Coppa Piacentina and Capocollo di Calabria, have Protected Designation of Origin status under the Common Agricultural Policy of European Union law, which ensures that only products genuinely originating in those regions are allowed in commerce as such.

Slices of Capocollo di Martina Franca served with figs.

Five additional Italian regions produce capicollo, and are not covered under European law, but are designated as “Prodotto agroalimentare tradizionale” by the Italian Ministry of Agricultural, Food, and Forestry Policies:

* Capocollo della Basilicata
* Capocollo del Lazio
* Capocollo di Martina FrancaIt is a traditional capocollo of Apulia. It is smoked with laurel leaves, thyme, almonds, Mediterranean herbs and pieces of bark of Macedonian Oak (called fragno in Italian), a tree typical of Southeastern Italy, Balkans and Western Turkey. Usually it is served with figs.
* Capocollo tipico senese (finocchiata or finocchiona, from Toscana)
* Capocollo dell’Umbria

Outside Italy, capocollo is traditionally produced also in the French island of Corsica under the names of coppa or capicollu.[14] Coppa di Corsica/de Corse is also a PDO product. It was introduced to Argentina by Italian immigrants, under the names bondiola or bondiola curada.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Stromboli

August 7, 2017 at 5:36 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Homemade Stromboli

Stromboli is a type of turnover filled with various cheeses (typically mozzarella) and cold cuts (typically Italian meats such as salami, capocollo and bresaola) or vegetables. The dough used is either Italian bread dough or pizza dough.

Stromboli was invented in the United States in the 1950s. It was named after the Italian film Stromboli.

A stromboli is somewhat similar to a calzone. A calzone is a baked turnover stuffed with pizza ingredients. A stromboli is usually made by rolling up dough that has been topped with pizza ingredients and then baking it. A calzone is crescent-shaped, and a stromboli is usually shaped like a long cylinder. The distinction between the two is complicated by the fact that there is some variation in what constitutes a stromboli.

 

Many American pizza shops serve a stromboli using pizza dough that is folded in half with fillings, similar to a half-moon-shaped calzone. At other establishments, a stromboli is made with a square-shaped pizza dough that can be topped with any pizza toppings and is then rolled into a cylindrical jelly roll shape and baked. Other variations include adding pizza sauce or deep-frying, similar to panzerotti.

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