Diabetic Dish of the Week – Cajun Stew

March 2, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a Cajun Stew. This week’s recipe is made using Onion, Celery, Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs, Turkey Andouille Sausage Links, Tomatoes, Okra, Rice and more! The Stew is 199 calories per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Cajun Stew
In the mood for some home cooking? You’ll love this authentic taste of the bayou! Featuring a hearty blend of chicken, andouille sausage, okra and brown rice, it will keep you fueled for hours.

Ingredients
1 teaspoon canola oil
1 onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 boneless skinless chicken thigh (about 4 ounces), cut into bite-size pieces
2 (2-ounce) turkey or chicken andouille sausage links, sliced into 1/4-inch-thick pieces
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1 can (about 14 ounces) no-salt-added diced tomatoes
2 cups frozen sliced okra
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon dried thyme

Directions
Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 1 1/2 cups

1. Heat oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion, celery and garlic; cook and stir 3 minutes. Add chicken and turkey sausage; cook and stir 2 minutes, or until browned on all sides. Pour in broth, stirring to scrape up browned bits.

2. Stir tomatoes, okra, rice, red pepper flakes, salt, black pepper and thyme into saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook 10 minutes.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 199 calories, Protein: 14 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 47 mg, Sodium: 436 mg, Fiber: 5 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/cajun-stew/

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Jambalaya with Cajun Style Smoked Sausage and Baked Italian Loaf Bread

November 10, 2020 at 7:19 PM | Posted in Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Jambalaya with Cajun Style Smoked Sausage and Baked Italian Bread

 

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I Poached an Egg and served it on a toasted Thomas Light English Muffin. I also heated up 2 Johnsonville Turkey Breakfast Sausage Links and a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Cloudy and 74 degrees out, with rain showers in the afternoon. After the night I had, I had no plans on doing too much. I had one of those long and sleepless nights while dealing with Phantom Pains, and they were bad! So I spent much of the afternoon catching up on some rest and sleep. For Dinner tonight I prepared Jambalaya with Cajun Style Smoked Sausage and Baked Italian Bread.

 

 

For the Sausage I used something new, Zatarain’s Cajun Style Smoked Sausage. I came across this at Meijer the other day and thought I would give it a try.

 

 

 

I used Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix (Reduced Sodium) for my base for the Jambalaya. I use Zatarain’s Products whenever I can, love the flavor and seasoning of all their products. To prepare it I just followed the easy instructions on the box. Mixed 2 1/2 cups of Water and 2 tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, and brought it to a boil. Added the Zatarain’s Jambalaya Mix and my Cajun Style Smoked Sausage, I had sliced the Sausage into small bite size pieces before adding. Returned it to a boil, and then reduced the heat to low. Covered and simmered for about 25 minutes till most of the moisture had been absorbed. Removed it from the heat and let it rest for about 5 minutes before I served it.

 

The Zatarain’s Cajun Style Smoked Sausage and Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix make a perfect pairing! Love this Sausage, nice seasoning and delicious! I added a couple of shakes of Frank’s Red Hot Sauce to the mix also, nothing like a little heat to liven things up! This makes one delicious dish. I also baked a loaf of Meijer Italian Loaf Bread. For Dessert later a bowl of Breyers Carb Smart Vanilla Bean Ice Cream.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zatarain’s Cajun Style Smoked Sausage

Zatarain’s, the trusted brand for Cajun cooking since 1889, introduces a spicy Cajun-style smoked sausage. Made with 100% pork and seasoned with paprika, this fully cooked smoked sausage makes a quick and easy main dish. Or, add to any of Zatarain’s Rice Mixes for a fast and flavorful one-pot meal.
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/smoked-sausage/cajun-style-smoked-sausage

 

 

 

 

Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix (Reduced Sodium)

Reduced Sodium Jambalaya Mix
Authentic New Orleans flavor with 25% less sodium than the original.Zatarains Jambalaya Mix

* This Easy-to-Prepare Dinner Mix Has Just The Right Blend of Ingredients For A Great-Tasting, Authentic New Orleans Style Meal. Zatarain’s Has Been The Leader In Authentic New Orleans Style Food Since 1889. So When You Want Great Flavor, Jazz It Up With Zatarain’s!
* Zatarain’s, New Orleans, La 70114. Comments Or Questions? Call 1-877-837-3796 Or Visit Us Online At http://www.Zatarain.Com For Great Recipe Ideas and Product Information.
* A New Orleans Tradition Since 1889
* 25% Less Sodium Than Our Original Jambalaya Mix
* Add Meat to Make A Complete Meal
* Serves 6

Ingredients;
Enriched Long Grain Parboiled Rice (Iron Phosphate, Niacin, Thiamine Mononitrate and Folic Acid), Dehydrated Vegetables (Onion, Bell Pepper), Salt, Yeast Extract, Soy Sauce (100% Soybean), Dextrose, Thiamine Hydrochloride, Soybean Oil (Tbhq Added As A Preservative), Paprika, Potassium Chloride, Garlic, Spices, Monosodium Glutamate, Chili Powder, Caramel Color, Silicon Dioxide (Flow Agent).

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories: 130
Calories from Fat: 0
Total Fat: 0 0%
Saturated Fat: 0 0%
Cholesterol: 0mg 0%
Sodium: 360mg 15%
Total Carb: 29g 10%
Dietary Fiber: <1g 4%
Sugar: 0g
Protein: 3g
http://www.zatarains.com/Products/Reduced-Sodium/Reduced-Sodium-Jambalaya.aspx

One of America’s Favorites – Étouffée

July 20, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Crawfish étouffée, served at a restaurant in New Orleans

Étouffée or etouffee (French: [e.tu.fe], English: /ˌeɪtuːˈfeɪ/ AY-too-FAY) is a dish found in both Cajun and Creole cuisine typically served with shellfish over rice. The dish employs a technique known as smothering, a popular method of cooking in the Cajun and Creole areas of southwest Louisiana. Étouffée is most popular in New Orleans and in the Acadiana area of the southernmost half of Louisiana as well as the coastal counties of Mississippi, Alabama, northern Florida, and eastern Texas.

Étouffée is a dish of seafood or chicken simmered in a sauce made from a light or blond roux.

It is most commonly made with shellfish, such as crab or shrimp. The most popular version of the dish is made with crayfish (or “crawfish”).

Étouffée is typically served over rice.

Another version of crawfish étouffée

Depending on who is making it and where it is being made it is flavored with either Creole or Cajun seasonings. Although Creole and Cajun cuisines are distinct, there are many similarities. In the case of the Creole version of crawfish étouffée, it is made with a blonde or brown roux and sometimes tomatoes are added. A blond roux is one that is cooked, stirring constantly, for approximately 5 minutes to remove the “raw” flavor of the flour and to add a slightly “nutty” flavor, while a brown roux is cooked longer (30 to 35 minutes) in order to deepen the color and flavor.

Around the 1950s, crawfish étouffée was introduced to restaurant goers in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana; however, the dish may have been invented as early as the late 1920s, according to some sources. Originally, crawfish étouffée was a popular dish amongst Cajuns in the bayous and backwaters of Louisiana. Around 1983, a waiter at the popular Bourbon Street restaurant Galatoire’s brought the dish to his boss to try. At the time, most New Orleans restaurants served French Creole cuisine, but this Cajun dish was a hit.

 

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes

October 8, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes with recipes including Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya, Slow-Cooker Jambalaya, and Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine, packed full of delicious and healthy recipes in every issue! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Cajun and Creole recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya
This catfish and sausage jambalaya recipe is one you might find in a neighborhood eatery in Creole country. Turkey sausage links have fewer calories and less fat than traditional pork sausage, but still deliver amazing taste to this dish……………….

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day…………………

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1½ teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2……………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19698/cuisines-regions/usa/cajun-creole/

One of America’s Favorites – Étouffée

September 16, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Crawfish étouffée, served at a restaurant in New Orleans

Étouffée or etouffee (French: [e.tu.fe], English: /ˌeɪtuːˈfeɪ/ AY-too-FAY) is a dish found in both Cajun and Creole cuisine typically served with shellfish over rice. The dish employs a technique known as smothering, a popular method of cooking in the Cajun areas of southwest Louisiana. Étouffée is most popular in New Orleans and in the Acadiana area of the southernmost half of Louisiana as well as the coastal counties of Mississippi, Alabama, northern Florida, and eastern Texas.

In French, the word “étouffée” (borrowed into English as “stuffed” or “stifled”) literally means “smothered” or “suffocated”, from the verb “étouffer”.

Étouffée is a dish of seafood or chicken simmered in a sauce made from a light or blond roux.

It is most commonly made with shellfish, such as crab or shrimp. The most popular version of the dish is made with crayfish (or “crawfish”).

Étouffée is typically served over rice.

Another version of crawfish étouffée

Depending on who is making it and where it is being made it is flavored with either Creole or Cajun seasonings. Although Creole and Cajun cuisines are distinct, there are many similarities. In the case of the Creole version of crawfish étouffée, it is made with a blonde or brown roux and sometimes tomatoes are added. A blond roux is one that is cooked, stirring constantly, for approximately 5 minutes to remove the “raw” flavor of the flour and to add a slightly “nutty” flavor, while a brown roux is cooked longer (30 to 35 minutes) in order to deepen the color and flavor.

Around the 1950s, crawfish étouffée was introduced to restaurant goers in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana; however, the dish may have been invented as early as the late 1920s, according to some sources. Originally, crawfish étouffée was a popular dish amongst Cajuns in the bayous and backwaters of Louisiana. Around 1983, a waiter at the popular Bourbon Street restaurant Galatoire’s brought the dish to his boss to try. At the time, most New Orleans restaurants served French Creole cuisine, but this Cajun dish was a hit.

MARDI GRAS AT THE MARKET -Findlay Market Cincinnati, Ohio

February 24, 2017 at 9:23 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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Mardi Gras at the Market is back, y’all! Mark your calendars for Sunday, February 26, 2017 from 11a-4p, and enjoy live music, Hurricane cocktails, local craft beers, food with a Cajun flair and merchant specials all day. Read on for the delectable details…

 

AVAILABLE ALL DAY:mardis-market

Mardi Gras-themed food from Smiley’s Bayou Catering & Schell’s Sweet & Savory Sensations
Hurricane Cocktails from LL Spirits
Local Craft Beer from Rhinegeist & Christian Moerlein
Merchant Specials (details below)
Live music from Lagniappe, J Dorsey Band and The Cincy Brass Jazz Quartet
Mardi Gras Beads (while supplies last)
WHEN: 26 February, 2017 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

 

Findlay Market 1801 Race St. Cincinnati, Ohio
http://www.findlaymarket.org/events/mardis-gras

Slow Cooker Chicken Recipes

February 7, 2017 at 6:11 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Slow Cooker Chicken Recipes. Here’s some more great recipes to put in your slow cooker, but this time its all Slow Cooker Chicken Recipes. You’ll find recipes like Chicken Mulligatawny Soup, Chicken-Shrimp Jambalaya, and Cajun Chicken with Okra. Find them all at the Diabetic Living Online website, and while there subscribe to their magazine – Diabetic Living. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Slow Cooker Chicken RecipesDiabetic living logo
Versatile and healthy, chicken adds a wonderful dimension to the dinner table. We’ve provided several delectable ways to fix it so you’ll never lose inspiration. Best of all, these recipes can be made in the slow cooker, so there’s less work, faster cleanup, and more time to enjoy outside of the kitchen.

 

 

Chicken Mulligatawny Soup

Curry powder offers a delicious taste to this Asian-inspired soup. Dish it up tonight for a low-calorie meal the whole family will love…..

 
Chicken-Shrimp Jambalaya

Cajun seasoning adds a fiery kick to this low-fat, easy-to-fix dish. Make sure you thaw the shrimp, if frozen, before adding them to the chicken mixture. Garnish each serving with celery leaves for a pop of color….

 
Cajun Chicken with Okra

Bottled cayenne pepper sauce is a vinegar-base sauce made from hot red cayenne chile peppers. Use it lightly on this dish unless you want an extra kick of flavor……

 

 

* Click the link below ti get all the Slow Cooker Chicken Recipes.
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/main-dishes/slow-cooker-chicken-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Gumbo

February 6, 2017 at 6:17 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A bowl of shrimp, chicken and bacon gumbo, served over rice

A bowl of shrimp, chicken and bacon gumbo, served over rice

Gumbo is a stew that originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and what Louisianians call the “Holy Trinity” of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers, and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used, the vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either a word from a Bantu language for okra (ki ngombo) or the Choctaw word for filé (kombo).

Several different varieties exist. Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish, tomatoes, and a dark roux, file, or both. Cajun gumbo is generally based on a dark roux and is made with shellfish or fowl. Sausage or ham is often added to gumbos of either variety. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers for a minimum of three hours, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. If desired, filé powder is added after the pot is removed from heat. Gumbo is traditionally served over rice. A third, lesser-known variety, the meatless gumbo z’herbes, is essentially a gumbo of slow-cooked greens sometimes thickened with roux, with rice served on the side.

The dish combines ingredients and culinary practices of several cultures, including French, Spanish, German, West African, and Choctaw. Gumbo may have been based on traditional West African or native dishes, or may be a derivation of the French dish bouillabaisse. It was first described in 1802, and was listed in various cookbooks in the latter half of the 19th century. The dish gained more widespread popularity in the 1970s, after the United States Senate cafeteria added it to the menu in honor of Louisiana Senator Allen Ellender. The popularity of chef Paul Prudhomme in the 1980s spurred further interest in gumbo. The dish is the official cuisine of the state of Louisiana.
Gumbo is a heavily seasoned soup or stew that combines several varieties of meat or seafood with a sauce or gravy. Any combination of meat or seafood can be used. Meat-based gumbo may consist of chicken, duck, squirrel, or rabbit, with oysters occasionally added. Seafood-based gumbo generally has shrimp, crabmeat, and sometimes oysters. Andouille sausage is often added to both meat and seafood gumbos to provide “piquancy, substance, and an additional layer of flavor” to the dish. With the exception of sausage and ham, beef and pork are almost never used. Most varieties of gumbo are seasoned with onions, parsley, bell pepper, and celery. Tomatoes are sometimes used in seafood gumbo, but traditionally few other vegetables are included.

 

Thickeners
Gumbo broth or gravy derives from three primary thickeners: okra, filé powder, and roux. Traditionally, okra and filé powder are not used in the same dish, although this rule is sometimes broken. Roux can be used alone or in conjunction with either of the other thickeners.

Okra is more often used as a thickener in seafood gumbos than those with meat. This mucilaginous vegetable is

Okra pods

Okra pods

usually cooked first, and other ingredients added once the desired consistency is reached. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, okra-based gumbos are becoming less popular, as changing tastes have made the okra texture less palatable.

Ground sassafras leaf, known as filé, is generally not added to the gravy until after the vegetables and meats or seafood have finished cooking and have been removed from the heat source. If added during the boiling process, filé makes the gumbo too ropey; when added at the end, the gumbo gains a slightly stringy texture.

Roux has become the most popular thickener, made from cooking together a roughly equal proportion of flour and fat (traditionally hog lard, although increasingly made with butter since the mid-20th century. The length of cooking time determines the final flavor and texture, since the longer the roux is cooked before being added to the gumbo, the darker it becomes and the less thickening power it retains. A very dark roux provides a much thinner sauce with a more intense flavor than a light roux.
Cajun vs. Creole gumbo

Creole seafood gumbo

Creole seafood gumbo

Gumbo is typically divided into two varieties. Combinations traditionally common in New Orleans and southeastern Louisiana are known as “Creole” after the Louisiana Creole people, descendants of French and Spanish settlers, who lived in those areas. “Cajun” combinations were common in southwestern Louisiana, which was populated primarily by Cajuns, descendants of the French-speaking settlers expelled from Acadia (located within the modern-day Canadian provinces of Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island) in the mid-18th century.

Gumbo is usually identified by its dark roux, cooked until it is a color “a few shades from burning”. The roux is used with okra or filé powder. Seafood is popular in gumbo the closer to the water the people are, but the southwestern areas of Louisiana often use fowl, such as chicken or duck, and sausage.[8][9] The fowl is generally not deboned, and onions, celery, and bell pepper are not strained out of the dish. Cajun gumbo is usually topped with parsley and green onions.

Creole gumbo most often consists of seafood, tomatoes, and a thickener. Before the latter half of the 20th century, celery was rarely used in Creole gumbo.
Gumbo is cooked for a minimum of three hours, and often simmers all day. Meat (but not seafood) is often browned beforehand and removed from the heat. Okra and roux are cooked before other vegetables and seafood. Okra is removed from heat when it reaches the desired consistency, while roux remains in the pot. Seasoning vegetables are then added to the sauce. When these have turned to mush (more commonly called cooked down), the meat and okra are added to the pot along with water and/or stock, then boiled uncovered until the desired tenderness of the meat is reached. Seasonings, including red, black, and white pepper, bay leaves, thyme, hot sauce, and salt, are added to taste. According to Nobles, “proper seasoning of gumbo is essential, and in Louisiana adding just the right zing is considered an art”. Because seafood cooks fairly quickly, it is not added to the pot until the end of the process. As the gumbo finishes cooking, green onions and parsley are sometimes sprinkled on it. When desired, filé powder is added last.

Creole and Cajun gumbos are served over hot rice, which helps the dish to feed a larger number of people. Gumbo

Cajun seafood gumbo

Cajun seafood gumbo

z’herbes is served with rice on the side. Gumbo is almost always served directly from the pot on the stove, although in wealthier or fancier homes the dish might be transferred to a tureen on the table. Often, gumbo and bread are the sole courses in a meal, although many Cajun families provide a side dish of potato salad. Occasionally, gumbo is served as part of a larger menu.

Soniat gives examples of the main types of creole gumbos, along with descriptions of family traditions about them.

 

Cajun Rainbow Trout w/ Hash Browns and Green Beans

October 30, 2015 at 4:57 PM | Posted in fish, greenbeans, Simply Potatoes | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Cajun Rainbow Trout w/ Hash Browns and Green Beans

 

Cajun Rainbow Trout w Hash Browns and Green Beans 008
Another chilly morning, 41 degrees. Cloudy and in the 50’s for the day. Still a cool breeze blowing so I couldn’t get the cart out. So stayed in and got some odd and ends jobs done around the house. Also did some updating on the computer. For dinner tonight I prepared a Cajun Rainbow Trout w/ Hash Browns and Green Beans.

 

 

 

 

Cajun Rainbow Trout w Hash Browns and Green Beans 003

While at Meijer yesterday I noticed they had some beautiful Rainbow Trout Fillets, just couldn’t pass it up! I had prepared Cajun Trout one other time and it was delicious, so why not again tonight! To prepare it all I’ll need is; 1 Rainbow Trout Fillet, 1 teaspoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 2 Teaspoon Zatarain’s Creole Seasoning, and 1 Teaspoon chopped Parsley Flakes. To prepare it I preheated the broiler. Patted the fillets dry and lightly brush both sides with oil. Sprinkled both sides evenly with Cajun seasoning. Placed skin side down on broiler rack and broil 4-6 inches from heat for 4-5 minutes or until the Trout flakes easily when I tested it with a fork. You can add a Lemon Wedge with it if you like. Excellent recipe, you have the fresh taste of the Trout along with all the flavor from the Cajun Seasoning! An easy made Keeper Recipe.

 

 

Simply Potatoes Hash Browns

Simply Potatoes Hash Browns

Then for one side I prepared some Simply Potatoes Hash Browns. Fried in Extra Virgin Olive Oil and seasoned them with Sea Salt, Ground Pepper, and Parsley. I love Hash Browns, they make the perfect side for any Fish Dish. I also heated up a small can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

 

Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash BrownsSimply Pot

Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash Browns fry up perfectly to a crisp, golden brown because they’re made from quality potatoes. They’re always fresh, never frozen so you’ll never have to worry about freezer burn. Fresh, delicious potatoes mean you never have to sacrifice great homemade taste.

Ingredients:
Potatoes, Dextrose, Disodium Dihydrogen Pyrophosphate (Added to Maintain Color), Potassium Sorbate And Sodium Bisulfite (Added to Maintain Freshness).

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 78 G
Servings Per Container 7
Amount Per Serving
Calories 70
Calories From Fat 0
% Daily Value
Total Fat 0 G 0
Saturated Fat 0 G 0
Trans Fat 0 G
Cholesterol 0 Mg 0
Sodium 55 Mg 2
Total Carboydrate 16 G 5
Dietary Fiber <2 G 8
Sugars 0 G
Protein 1 G
http://www.simplypotatoes.com/products/productview.cfm?prid=34

Cajun Rainbow Trout w/ Hash Browns and Green Beans

September 5, 2014 at 5:16 PM | Posted in fish, hash browns, Simply Potatoes | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Cajun Rainbow Trout w/ Hash Browns and Green Beans

 

 

 

Rainbow Trout Hash Browns 006
Had the three H’s going today for our weather, Hot – Hazy – Humid. Mom picked Dad up this morning at the rehab center and brought him home for the day. We had to take him back about 3:00 though. He’s still not ready to come back home, still really weak. Went to the Kroger up the road for Mom and over in the produce they were just putting out my favorite Apple, the Honeycrisp Apple! Love these Apples, flavor packed and a good crisp Apple. They have been out of season for a while now and been buying Fuji Apples, good but nearly the size of the Honeycrisp. For dinner tonight I prepared Cajun Rainbow Trout w/ Hash Browns and Green Beans.

 

 

 

Rainbow Trout Hash Browns 001
While at Kroger the day before I noticed they had some beautiful Rainbow Trout Fillets, I knew I my dinner! First time I’ve tried it Cajun and I love Cajun so why not Cajun Rainbow Trout. To prepare it all I’ll need is; 1 Rainbow Trout Fillet, 1 teaspoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 Teaspoon Cajun Seasoning, and 2 Teaspoons chopped Parsley Flakes. To prepare it I preheated the broiler. Patted the fillets dry and lightly brush both sides with oil. Sprinkled both sides evenly with Cajun seasoning. Placed skin side down on broiler rack and broil 4-6 inches from heat for 4-5 minutes or until the Trout flakes easily when I tested it with a fork. You can add a Lemon Wedge with it if you like. Excellent recipe, you have the fresh taste of the Trout along with all the flavor from the Cajun Seasoning! An easy Keeper Recipe.

 

 

 

Simply Potatoes Hash Browns

Simply Potatoes Hash Browns

Then for one side I prepared some Simply Potatoes Hash Browns. Fried in Extra Virgin Olive Oil and seasoned them with Sea Salt, Ground Pepper, and Parsley. I also heated up a small can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

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