One of America’s Favorites – Caesar Salad

February 23, 2015 at 6:24 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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A Caesar salad

A Caesar salad

A Caesar salad is a salad of romaine lettuce and croutons dressed with Parmesan cheese, lemon juice, olive oil, egg, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, and black pepper. It is often prepared table side.

 

 

The salad’s creation is generally attributed to restaurateur Caesar Cardini, an Italian immigrant who operated restaurants in Mexico and the United States. Cardini was living in San Diego but also working in Tijuana where he avoided the restrictions of Prohibition. His daughter Rosa (1928–2003) recounted that her father invented the dish when a Fourth of July 1924 rush depleted the kitchen’s supplies. Cardini made do with what he had, adding the dramatic flair of the table-side tossing “by the chef.” A number of Cardini’s staff have said that they invented the dish.

Julia Child said that she had eaten a Caesar salad at Cardini’s restaurant when she was a child in the 1920s. The earliest contemporary documentation of Caesar Salad is from a 1946 Lawry’s The Prime Rib (Los Angeles, California) restaurant menu, twenty-two years after the 1924 origin attributed to the Cardinis.

 

 

A simple Caesar salad

A simple Caesar salad

The original Caesar salad recipe (unlike his brother Alex’s Aviator’s salad) did not contain pieces of anchovy; the slight anchovy flavor comes from the Worcestershire sauce. Cardini was opposed to using anchovies in his salad.

In the 1970s, Cardini’s daughter said that the original recipe included whole lettuce leaves, which were meant to be lifted by the stem and eaten with the fingers; coddled eggs; and Italian olive oil.

Bottled Caesar dressings are now produced and marketed by many companies.

The trademark brands, “Cardini’s”, “Caesar Cardini’s” and “The Original Caesar Dressing” are all claimed to date to February 1950, though they were only registered decades later, and more than a dozen varieties of bottled Cardini’s dressing are available today. Some recipes include mustard, avocado, tomato, bacon bits, garlic cloves or anchovies. Cardini’s Brand original Caesar dressing is somewhat different from Rosa’s version.

 

 

One of the most common Caesar salad variations, shown here topped with grilled chicken

One of the most common Caesar salad variations, shown here topped with grilled chicken

Many variations of the salad exist; for example, by topping a Caesar salad with grilled chicken, steak, or seafood. Certain Mexican restaurants may improvise on items such as substituting tortilla strips for croutons or Cotija cheese for the Parmesan.

Ingredients
Common ingredients in many recipes:

* romaine or cos lettuce
* olive or vegetable oil
* fresh crushed garlic
* salt to taste
* fresh-ground black pepper
* lemon or lime juice – fresh squeezed
* Worcestershire sauce
* raw or coddled egg yolks
* freshly grated Parmesan cheese
* freshly prepared croutons

Variations
There are limitless variations. However, some of the more common are:

* other varieties of lettuce
* grilled poultry (most often chicken), meat, shellfish, or fish
* capers
* Romano cheese
* anchovies
* bacon

 

 

 

There is inherent risk of infection by salmonella bacteria occasionally found in raw egg from cracked or improperly washed eggshells. This is a concern with many similar dressings that are emulsified with eggs, though generally the pH level is thought to be acidic enough to kill those bacteria. Nevertheless, later versions of the recipe call at least for briefly cooked coddled eggs or pasteurized eggs. Recipes may omit the egg and produce a “Caesar vinaigrette”. Many variations of this salad exist; yogurt is sometimes substituted for the eggs to maintain a creamy texture and others call for using mayonnaise, oil and vinegar.

 

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Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Bolognese Sauce

March 13, 2013 at 9:57 AM | Posted in bison | Leave a comment
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Another good one from the web site of  http://wildideabuffalo.com/ The Buffalo Sausage used in the recipe can be purchased at Wild Idea Buffalo.

 

 
Buffalo Bolognese Sauce

 
Our clean, earthy and slightly sweet Italian Buffalo Sausage gives this red sauce an extra richness without the heaviness. Sure to be a Wild Idea Buffalo Bolognese Saucehit with the family or great for casual entertaining.

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS:

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 – Pound Italian Buffalo Sausage
1 – onion, diced
1 tablespoon fresh garlic, chopped
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon dried basil
2 teaspoon dried, crushed fennel
½ teaspoon fresh rosemary, finely diced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 – cup red wine
1 quart crushed tomatoes, (rinse jar with 1 cup water)
1 tablespoon brown sugar
½ tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Spaghetti, prepared el dente
PREPARATION:

1.) Heat olive oil in heavy sauce pan over medium high heat.
2.) Coarsely crumble in Buffalo Italian Sausage and stir once.
3.) Add onion, garlic and dried spices. Stir to incorporate. Continue to cook until sausage is lightly browned, stirring occasionally.
4.) Add red wine and stir.
5.) Add remaining ingredients. Let ingredients come to full heat, stirring occasionally.
6.) Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered for ½ hour or until desired thickness is achieved. Stir occasionally.
7.) Season to taste.

Serve over pasta, and sprinkle with freshly grated parmesan and garnish with fresh basil leaf. Accompany with warm Italian Bread and Caesar Salad for a complete meal.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/buffalo-spaghetti-meat-sauce/

The Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week: Buffalo Stuffed Ravioli with Simple Tomato Sauce

February 27, 2013 at 10:24 AM | Posted in bison, pasta | Leave a comment
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The Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is Buffalo Stuffed Ravioli with Simple Tomato Sauce. This recipe can be found at http://wildideabuffalo.com/. The website is not only full of great recipes but also an online store full of Buffalo Products, check it out! I might add the best tasting Buffalo I’ve ever had!

 

 
Buffalo Stuffed Ravioli with Simple Tomato Sauce (Serves 6)

When rolling out dough, do not take it to thin, your ravioli’s will break open. Take only to dial 6 on your pasta roller. Also its

Buffalo stuffed Ravioli

Buffalo stuffed Ravioli

unnecessary to cook the meat before filling the ravioli’s. It cooks through just fine during boiling process.

Simple Tomato Sauce:

*1 teaspoon olive oil
*1 large headed shallot, peeled and julienned
*1 quart jar canned tomatoes (or best canned tomatoes available)
*1 sprig fresh oregano, leaves only chopped
*1 sprig fresh basil, leaves only chopped
*½ teaspoon salt
*¼ teaspoon pepper
*1 cup water

1. In saucepan, heat oil over medium high heat.
2. Add shallots and sauté for 2 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and continue cooking until lightly browned.
3. Add tomatoes, seasoning and water and stir to incorporate.
4. Bring to a simmer and remove from heat until ready to use.
Ravioli Filling:

* 1 lb. Italian Buffalo Sausage
* 8 oz. fresh Buffalo Mozzarella, drained for 1 hr.
Pasta Dough Ingredients: Makes 30 + Raviolis

* 1 cup Semolina flour
* 1 cup unbleached flour
* ½ teaspoon salt
* 3 eggs
* 2 tablespoons water

1. On clean work surface mix flours & salt. Create whole in center of flour mixture.
2. Mix eggs and water in bowl, and pour into flour center.
3. Gradually whisk in flour until well incorporated. Add more water if needed.
4. Kneed dough until smooth and elastic, about 7 minutes.
5. Separate dough into 3 sections. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.
Ravioli Assembly:

1. Roll one section of dough into a rectangle.
2. Place your pasta machine roller dial on 1 and run dough through.
3. Run dough through two more times, second on dial 3, and third on dial 6.
4. Place strip of dough on lightly floured counter and cut into smaller rectangles, about 2.5 x 4
5. Place ½ oz. of Italian sausage in bottom center of rectangle.
6. Place ¼ oz of buffalo mozzarella on top of sausage.
7. Fold top half of pasta over bottom half.
8. Seal sides together with damp fork. Place ravioli’s on a floured sheet pan continue above process with remaining dough.
9. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Place 10 raviolis in pot at one time. Boil for about 4 minutes. Raviolis will float to the top when they are done.
10. Remove ravioli’s with slotted spoon and place in bowl cover to keep warm.
To Serve: Place 5 ravioli’s in pasta bowl and pour one cup of pasta sauce over the top.

 

Garnish with freshly grated Parmigianino Reggiano and serve immediately. Accompany with *Caesar Salad. *Recipe included in this months special.

Wine Pairing:

VILLA POZZI, 2009 NERO D’ AVOLA, SICILY, ITALY

 
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2011/buffalo-stuffed-ravioli-with-simple-tomato-sauce/

Fish of the Week – Anchovy

February 13, 2013 at 10:38 AM | Posted in fish | Leave a comment
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I’ve run weekly articles on fruit, vegetables, cheese and other items so why not one of my favorite foods – fish and seafood! I’ll start with the Anchovy and work my way down the list. Hope you enjoy it.

 

Anchovies are a family (Engraulidae) of small, common salt-water forage fish. There are 144 species in 17 genera, found in the Atlantic,

Anchovy closeup

Anchovy closeup

Indian, and Pacific Oceans. Anchovies are usually classified as an oily fish.
Anchovies are small, green fish with blue reflections due to a silver longitudinal stripe that runs from the base of the caudal fin. They range from 2 centimeters (0.79 in) to 40 centimeters (16 in) in adult length, and the body shape is variable with more slender fish in northern populations.
The snout is blunt with tiny, sharp teeth in both jaws. The snout contains a unique rostral organ, believed to be sensory in nature, although its exact function is unknown. The mouth is larger than that of herrings and silversides, two fish anchovies closely resemble in other respects. The anchovy eats plankton and fry (recently-hatched fish).
Anchovies are found in scattered areas throughout the world’s oceans, but are concentrated in temperate waters, and are rare or absent in very cold or very warm seas. They are generally very accepting of a wide range of temperatures and salinity. Large schools can be found in shallow, brackish areas with muddy bottoms, as in estuaries and bays. They are abundant in the Mediterranean, particularly in the Alboran Sea, and the Black Sea. The species is regularly caught along the coasts of Crete, Greece, Sicily, Italy, France, Turkey, and Spain. They are also found on the coast of northern Africa. The range of the species also extends along the Atlantic coast of Europe to the south of Norway. Spawning occurs between October and March, but not in water colder than 12 °C (54 °F). The anchovy appears to spawn at least 100 kilometers (62 mi) from the shore, near the surface of the water.
The anchovy is a significant food source for almost every predatory fish in its environment, including the California halibut, rock fish, yellowtail, shark, chinook, and coho salmon. It is also extremely important to marine mammals and birds; for example, breeding success of California brown pelicans and elegant terns is strongly connected to anchovy abundance.
A traditional method of processing and preserving anchovies is to gut and salt them in brine, allow them to mature, and then pack

Canned anchovies

Canned anchovies

them in oil or salt. This results in a characteristic strong flavor and the flesh turns deep grey. Pickled in vinegar, as with Spanish boquerones, anchovies are milder and the flesh retains a white color. In Roman times, anchovies were the base for the fermented fish sauce garum. Garum had a sufficiently long shelf life for long-distance commerce, and was produced in industrial quantities. Anchovies were also eaten raw as an aphrodisiac. Today they are used in small quantities to flavor many dishes. Because of the strong flavor, they are also an ingredient in several sauces and condiments, including Worcestershire sauce, Caesar salad dressing, remoulade, Gentleman’s Relish, many fish sauces, and in some versions of Café de Paris butter. For domestic use, anchovy fillets are packed in oil or salt in small tins or jars, sometimes rolled around capers. Anchovy paste is also available. Fishermen also use anchovies as bait for larger fish, such as tuna and sea bass.
The strong taste people associate with anchovies is due to the curing process. Fresh anchovies, known in Italy as alici, have a much milder flavor. In Sweden and Finland, the name anchovies is related strongly to a traditional seasoning, hence the product “anchovies” is normally made of sprats and also herring can be sold as “anchovy-spiced”, leading to confusion when translating recipes.

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