Diabetic Dish of the Week – LUCK OF THE IRISH CORNED BEEF BRISKET

March 5, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – LUCK OF THE IRISH CORNED BEEF BRISKET. When Irish Eyes are smiling…. And those Eyes are smiling with this week’s recipe of LUCK OF THE IRISH CORNED BEEF BRISKET. Made using Angus Beef fresh corned beef brisket along with Spices, Carrots, Cabbage, and Onions. The Dish is 374 calories and 15 carbs per serving! Having Diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the Irish Foods! The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website which has a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

LUCK OF THE IRISH CORNED BEEF BRISKET

Ingredients

4 lb. Certified Angus Beef fresh corned beef brisket with seasoning packet
1 (1-in.) cinnamon stick
2 bay leaves
6 carrots, peeled and halved
12 coriander seeds
1 large head cabbage, cut into 8 wedges
2 onion, halved and stuck with 2 cloves each
12 whole peppercorns
3 sprigs fresh parsley
3 quarts water

Directions

1 – Place corned beef and seasoning packet in large heavy pot; add water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 1 hr.
2 – Add onions and carrots. Bring back to a boil and skim off fat.
3 – Add remaining ingredients, reduce heat to medium-low and cover. Simmer approximately 2 to 4 hrs. until beef is tender. When brisket pierces easily, it is ready.
4 – Drain the water, place brisket on a platter and let stand about 10 mins.
5 – Slice diagonally across the grain and serve with cabbage, carrots and onion.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 8 servings

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 374
Fat: 11 grams
Saturated Fat: 4 grams
Fiber: 5 grams
Sodium: 1741 milligrams
Cholesterol: 103 milligrams
Protein: 49 grams
Carbohydrates: 15 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/luck-of-the-irish-corned-beef-brisket

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One of America’s Favorites – Sauerkraut

December 31, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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German sauerkraut

Sauerkraut (/ˈsaʊ.ərkraʊt/; German: [ˈzaʊɐˌkʁaʊt] is finely cut raw cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria. It has a long shelf life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid formed when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage leaves.

Fermented foods have a long history in many cultures, with sauerkraut being one of the most well-known instances of traditional fermented moist cabbage side dishes. The Roman writers Cato (in his De Agri Cultura) and Columella (in his De re Rustica) mentioned preserving cabbages and turnips with salt.

Sauerkraut originally came from China, from where it was brought over to Europe by the Tatars. The Tatars improved upon the original Chinese recipe by fermenting it with salt instead of rice wine. Another claim is that the dish was brought over by the Mongol Emperor Genghis Khan. It then took root mostly in Central and Eastern European cuisines, but also in other countries including the Netherlands, where it is known as zuurkool, and France, where the name became choucroute. The English name is borrowed from German where it means literally “sour herb” or “sour cabbage”. The names in Slavic and other Central and Eastern European languages have similar meanings with the German word: “fermented cabbage” (Albanian: lakër turshi, Belarusian: квашаная капуста, Czech: kysané zelí, Polish: kiszona kapusta or kwaszona kapusta, Lithuanian: rauginti kopūstai, Russian: квашеная капуста, tr. kvashenaya kapusta, Ukrainian: квашена капуста) or “sour cabbage” (Bulgarian: кисело зеле, Croatian: kiselo zelje, Czech: kyselé zelí, Estonian: hapukapsas, Finnish: hapankaali, Hungarian: savanyúkáposzta, Latvian: skābēti kāposti, Romanian: varză murată, Russian: кислая капуста, tr. kislaya kapusta, Serbian: kiseli kupus, Slovak: kyslá kapusta, Slovene: kislo zelje, Ukrainian: кисла капуста, kisla kapusta).

Before frozen foods, refrigeration, and cheap transport from warmer areas became readily available in northern, central and eastern Europe, sauerkraut – like other preserved foods – provided a source of nutrients during the winter. James Cook always took a store of sauerkraut on his sea voyages, since experience had taught him it prevented scurvy.

The word “Kraut”, derived from this food, is a derogatory term for the German people. During World War I, due to concerns the American public would reject a product with a German name, American sauerkraut makers relabeled their product as “Liberty Cabbage” for the duration of the war.

Homemade sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is made by a process of pickling called lactic acid fermentation that is analogous to how traditional (not heat-treated) pickled cucumbers and kimchi are made. The cabbage is finely shredded, layered with salt, and left to ferment. Fully cured sauerkraut keeps for several months in an airtight container stored at 15 °C (60 °F) or below. Neither refrigeration nor pasteurization is required, although these treatments prolong storage life.

Fermentation by lactobacilli is introduced naturally, as these air-borne bacteria culture on raw cabbage leaves where they grow. Yeasts also are present, and may yield soft sauerkraut of poor flavor when the fermentation temperature is too high. The fermentation process has three phases, collectively sometimes referred to as population dynamics. In the first phase, anaerobic bacteria such as Klebsiella and Enterobacter lead the fermentation, and begin producing an acidic environment that favors later bacteria. The second phase starts as the acid levels become too high for many bacteria, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides and other Leuconostoc spp. take dominance. In the third phase, various Lactobacillus species, including L. brevis and L. plantarum, ferment any remaining sugars, further lowering the pH. Properly cured sauerkraut is sufficiently acidic to prevent a favorable environment for the growth of Clostridium botulinum, the toxins of which cause botulism.

A 2004 genomic study found an unexpectedly large diversity of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut, and that previous studies had oversimplified this diversity. Weissella was found to be a major organism in the initial, heterofermentative stage, up to day 7. It was also found that Lactobacillus brevis and Pediococcus pentosaceus had smaller population numbers in the first 14 days than previous studies had reported.

The Dutch sauerkraut industry found that inoculating a new batch of sauerkraut with an old batch resulted in an excessively sour product. This sourdough process is known as “backslopping” or “inoculum enrichment”; when used in making sauerkraut, first- and second-stage population dynamics, important to developing flavor, are bypassed. This is due primarily to the greater initial activity of species L. plantarum.

Regional varieties

Eastern European style sauerkraut pickled with carrots and served as a salad

In Belarusian, Polish, Russian, Baltic country and Ukrainian cuisine, chopped cabbage is often pickled together with shredded carrots. Other ingredients may include whole or quartered apples for additional flavor or cranberry for flavor and better keeping (the benzoic acid in cranberries is a common preservative). Bell peppers and beets are added in some recipes for color. The resulting sauerkraut salad is typically served cold, as a zakuski or a side dish. There is also a home made type of very mild sauerkraut where white cabbage is pickled with salt in a refrigerator for only between three and seven days. This results in very little lactic acid being produced. Sometimes in Russia the double fermentation is used, with the initial step producing an exceptionally sour product, which is then “corrected” by adding 30-50% more fresh cabbage and fermenting the mix again. The flavor additives like apples, beets, cranberries and sometimes even watermelons are usually introduced at this step.

Many health benefits have been claimed for sauerkraut:

* It is a source of vitamins B, C, and K; the fermentation process increases the bioavailability of nutrients rendering sauerkraut even more nutritious than the original cabbage. It is also low in calories and high in calcium and magnesium, and it is a very good source of dietary fiber, folate, iron, potassium, copper and manganese.
* If unpasteurized and uncooked, sauerkraut also contains live lactobacilli and beneficial microbes and is rich in enzymes. Fiber and probiotics improve digestion and promote the growth of healthy bowel flora, protecting against many diseases of the digestive tract.
* During the American Civil War, the physician John Jay Terrell (1829–1922) was able to successfully reduce the death rate from disease among prisoners of war; he attributed this to feeding his patients raw sauerkraut.
* Sauerkraut and its juice is a time-honored folk remedy for canker sores. The treatment is to rinse the mouth with sauerkraut juice for about 30 seconds several times a day, or place a wad of sauerkraut against the affected area for a minute or so before chewing and swallowing the sauerkraut.
* In 2002, the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry reported that Finnish researchers found the isothiocyanates produced in sauerkraut fermentation inhibit the growth of cancer cells in test tube and animal studies. A Polish study in 2010 concluded that “induction of the key detoxifying enzymes by cabbage juices, particularly sauerkraut, may be responsible for their chemopreventive activity demonstrated by epidemiological studies and in animal models”.
* Sauerkraut is high in the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, both associated with preserving ocular health.

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Oriental-Style Sea Scallops

November 6, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is Oriental-Style Sea Scallops. Scallops along with Broccoli, Onion, Cabbage, Pea Pods and Mushrooms, and Rice all combine to make this Diabetic Friendly Dish. Equal replaces the Sugar in the Recipe. It’s another recipe from the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes, diets, and cuisines. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Oriental-Style Sea Scallops
Broccoli, onion, cabbage, pea pods and mushrooms are combined with scallops in a tasty sauce. Ground anise and coriander give this dish a unique flavor. Serve it over hot rice.

Recipe Ingredients:
2 tablespoons sesame or vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups broccoli florets
1 cup thinly sliced onion
1 pound sea scallops
3 cups thinly sliced Napa cabbage or bok choy
2 cups snow peas, ends trimmed
1 cup sliced shiitake or button mushrooms
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons ground star anise*
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
2 to 3 teaspoons light soy sauce
1/4 cup cold water
2 tablespoons cornstarch
2 to 3 tablespoons Equal® Spoonful**
4 cups hot cooked rice

Cooking Directions:
1 – Heat oil in wok or large skillet. Cook and stir broccoli and onion 3 to 4 minutes. Add scallops, cabbage, snow peas, mushrooms, garlic, anise and coriander. Cook and stir 2 to 3 minutes.
2 – Add chicken broth, vinegar and soy sauce. Heat to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, about 5 minutes or until scallops are cooked and vegetables are tender.
3 – Combine cold water and cornstarch. Stir cornstarch mixture into boiling mixture. Boil, stirring constantly, until thickened. Remove from heat; let stand 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in Equal®.
4 – Serve over rice.
Makes 6 servings.

*You can substitute 2 teaspoons five-spice powder for the star anise and coriander. Amounts of vinegar and soy sauce may need to be adjusted to taste.
**May substitute 3 to 4 packets Equal sweetener.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/6 of recipe): calories 330, protein 20 g, carbohydrate 49 g, fat 6 g, cholesterol 26 mg, sodium 276 mg.

https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/oriental-style-sea-scallops-diabetic-recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – New England Boiled Dinner

November 5, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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New England boiled dinner is the basis of a traditional New England meal, consisting of corned beef or a smoked “picnic ham” shoulder, with cabbage and added vegetable items, often including potato, rutabaga, parsnip, carrot, white turnip, and onion. With a beef roast, this meal is often known simply as corned beef and cabbage. A similar Newfoundland dish is called a Jiggs dinner.

New England boiled dinner is a traditional meal on St. Patrick’s Day. Ireland produced a significant amount of the corned beef in the Atlantic trade from local cattle and salt imported from the

New England boiled dinner with cabbage, potato, white turnip, rutabaga, carrot, onion, and parsnip

Iberian Peninsula and southwestern France. Coastal cities, such as Dublin, Belfast, and Cork, created vast beef curing and packing industries, with Cork producing half of Ireland’s annual beef exports in 1668. Most of the people of Ireland during this period consumed little of the meat produced, in either fresh or salted form, due to its prohibitive cost. In the colonies the product was looked upon with disdain due to its association with poverty and slavery.

Corned beef was used as a substitute for bacon by Irish-American immigrants in the late 19th century. Corned beef and cabbage is the Irish-American variant of the original Irish dish of bacon and cabbage.

A “picnic ham” shoulder consists of the cured and smoked primal pork shoulder, which is cut from the lower portion of a hog’s foreleg still containing the arm and shank bones. The meat is then boiled with root vegetables for several hours or until it is tender. The resulting meat does not taste similar to a traditional ham.

Corned beef is prepared before the actual cooking of the meal by seasoning a cut of beef with salt (large grains of salt were known as corns) and spices and the natural meat juices. This meat is then placed whole, like a rump or pot roast into a crock pot, which in olden times was a ceramic pot over a fire, filled with cabbage and carrots, and, when available, red potatoes. However, after Luther Burbank’s alteration of potatoes, the potatoes were chopped when placed in the pot. Rutabaga or turnips are also common ingredients. This meal can be left in a crock pot all day but must be kept in the naturally humid environment of cooking meat. Corned beef and cabbage is often served as a whole meal.

Smoked shoulder is an exceptionally salty cut of meat. Two different methods of preparation are commonly used to decrease the amount of salt in the meat. In the first method, the meat is placed in a pot and soaked in a refrigerated cold water bath for one day prior to cooking. During the soak, the water is changed several times. The pot of meat and water is then boiled on the stovetop until the meat is tender. In the second method, the meat is placed in cold water and brought to a boil. The boiling water is then poured off, replaced with fresh cold water, and the ham is brought to a boil again. This process can be repeated several times, as deemed appropriate by the chef, before the meat is allowed to cook. A combination of both methods is also acceptable. This is a very easy meal to cook, as the salt and flavor of the meat require no additional seasonings. The ham generally must boil for several hours until it is ready to eat. The vegetables are placed in the pot and boiled with the meat; however, some chefs prefer to place them in the ham’s water after the meat has been removed to avoid overcooking.

Common condiments include horseradish, mustard, and cider vinegar.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 30, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Salads and crisp cabbage……..

To make cabbage crisper for salad, soak chunks in ice water mixed with a spoonful of salt for 15 to 30 minutes before chopping.

One of America’s Favorites – Runza

September 3, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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A runza (also called a bierock, krautburger, fleischkuche, or kraut pirok) is a yeast dough bread pocket with a filling consisting of beef, cabbage or sauerkraut, onions, and seasonings. They are baked in various shapes such as a half-moon, rectangle, round (bun), square, or triangle. At Runza restaurants, the runza is baked in a rectangular shape. The bierocks of Kansas, on the other hand, are generally baked in the shape of a bun.

The runza sandwich originated in Russia during the 1800s and spread to Germany before appearing in the United States. Bierock comes from the Russian pirogi or pirozhki and is the term for any food consisting of a savory filling-stuffed dough. The recipe was passed down from generation to generation and is available throughout the Americas, particularly Argentina and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba. The recipe was spread throughout the United States by the Volga Germans (Germans from Russia) and can be found in Colorado, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Kansas, Oklahoma and California.

The term “runza” is registered as a trademark in the United States by Nebraska-based Runza restaurants.

 

Soup Special of the Day………Vegetable Soup

August 5, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, soup, Soup Special of the Day | Leave a comment
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This week’s Soup Special of the Day is – Vegetable Soup. You can never have too many Vegetable Soup recipes! This one is from the CooksRecipes website. This is just one of many delicious and healthy Soup Recipes that you find at the Cooks site so check it out today! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Vegetable Soup
Hot and hearty vegetable soup with bacon and cabbage in the mix.

Recipe Ingredients:
1/4 cup butter
1/2 cup sliced carrot
1/2 cup diced onion
1/2 cup peeled diced potato
1/2 cup sliced celery
2 strips of bacon
6 cups hot water
3 teaspoons beef base or bouillon granules
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 tablespoon minced thyme
1 tomato, seeded and diced
1/2 to 1 cup diced cabbage

Cooking Directions:
1 – In a large kettle, heat butter over low heat until melted. Add sliced carrots, diced onions, chopped potatoes, and sliced celery. Increase the heat to medium and add strips of bacon. Cook for 5 minutes then add hot water and beef base.
2 – Next add soy sauce, pepper, thyme, and diced tomato. Over medium heat, cook covered for 30 to 35 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add diced cabbage and cook for an additional 10 minutes before serving.
Makes 6 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/soup/vegetable_soup_recipe_2.html

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Easy Greek Turkey Pitas

April 13, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Easy Greek Turkey Pitas. Made using Deli Sliced JENNIE-O® Mesquite Smoked Turkey Breast along with Crumbled Feta, crunchy Cabbage, Mint, 3 Bean Salad, and Yogurt served in a Whole Wheat Pita Bread Pockets. Delicious and made in under 15 minutes! You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Easy Greek Turkey Pitas
Ready in under 15 minutes these delicious pita sandwiches are perfect for a quick snack, lunch or weeknight dinner. Made with fresh deli turkey, crumbled feta, crunchy cabbage and mint, they’re sure to go fast.

INGREDIENTS
4 (6-inch) whole wheat pita bread pockets
½ pound JENNIE-O® Mesquite Smoked Turkey Breast from the service deli, sliced
8 tablespoons shredded cabbage
8 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese
8 tablespoons three-bean salad
8 tablespoons plain yogurt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint or basil

DIRECTIONS
1) Halve pita bread pockets and open. Roll turkey breast and place in each pocket. Evenly divide among pockets cabbage, feta cheese, three-bean salad and yogurt among pita pockets. Top with fresh mint.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 200
Protein 19g
Carbohydrates 23g
Fiber 4g
Sugars 5g
Fat 4g
Cholesterol 35mg
Sodium 930mg
Saturated Fat 2g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/108-easy-greek-turkey-pitas

Soup Special of the Day!……Ten Vegetable Soup

February 25, 2018 at 6:03 AM | Posted in Diabetic Gourmet Magazine, soup, Soup Special of the Day | Leave a comment
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This week’s Soup Special of the Day is a Ten Vegetable Soup. The Ten Vegetables you’ll be using are carrots, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, canned tomatoes, leek, onion, Swiss chard, a potato and parsley. The recipe makes 10 servings and is 70 calories and 7 net carbs per serving. This is another delicious and healthy recipe from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. Check the Diabetic Gourmet site out for all their many Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

 

Ten Vegetable Soup
With Ten Vegetable Soup, you combine terrific-tasting and healthy carrots, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, canned tomatoes, leek, onion, Swiss chard, a potato and parsley. Tossing them all into a pot takes less than 30 minutes. The result is enough to eat for several days — and it also freezes nicely.

Makes 10 servings. Per serving: 1 cup

Ingredients

2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
3 cups chopped green cabbage, quartered and cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips (or purchase already shredded)
1 cup cauliflower florets, 1-inch pieces
1 medium leek, sliced, use white and 1-inch of light green part
1 small onion, chopped
1 medium carrot, chopped
1 medium celery stalk, chopped
1 (14.5-oz.) can no salt added diced tomatoes
4 cups low-fat, reduced-sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1 medium yellow-fleshed potato, diced
1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 Tbsp. dried thyme
1 1/2 packed cups Swiss chard or spinach, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch strips
Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
Pinch of red pepper flakes or cayenne, optional
Grated Parmesan cheese, optional

Directions

1 – In large Dutch oven or heavy soup pot with tight-fitting cover, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add cabbage, cauliflower, leek, onion, carrot and celery and stir to coat them with oil. Cook until cabbage is limp and onion translucent, 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low and cook gently until vegetables release their juices, about 8 minutes.
2 – Add tomatoes with their liquid, broth, potato, parsley and thyme. Increase heat to medium-high until liquid boils, then cover, reduce heat, and simmer soup for 10 minutes. Add Swiss chard and simmer for 10 minutes. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper; let sit for 15 minutes before serving. If desired refrigerate for up to 4 days, reheating in covered pot over medium heat. Or divide cooled soup among resealable freezer bags and freeze. This soup keeps in freezer for up to 2 months.

Nutritional Information Per Serving:
70 calories
3 g fat
less than 1 g sat fat
9 g carbohydrates
3 g protein
2 g fiber
253 mg sodium
https://diabeticgourmet.com/articles/diabetic-meals-10-healthy-soup-and-chowder-recipes/

Healthy Vegetable Side Dish Recipes

February 6, 2018 at 6:30 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Vegetable Side Dish Recipes. Make all your meals healthier with these Healthy Vegetable Side Dish Recipes. Nutritious, Healthy and Delicious dishes like; Pan-Fried Cabbage with Bacon and Shallot, Gomen (Ethiopian-Style Collard Greens), and Baked Butternut Squash. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Vegetable Side Dish Recipes
Find healthy, delicious vegetable side dish recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Pan-Fried Cabbage with Bacon and Shallot
Of all the vegetables in the supermarket, cabbage gives you some of the best value for your dollar. It’s inexpensive and low in calories, but packed with nutritional benefits (vitamin C, fiber, cancer-fighting phytochemicals). This easy vegetable side dish gets a boost of flavor from shallot, caraway seeds and a delicious finish of crisp bacon………

Gomen (Ethiopian-Style Collard Greens)
These sautéed collards can be served as a vegan main dish or as a hearty side to doro alicha (chicken with onions and spiced butter sauce) or messer wot (spiced lentils). Either way, don’t forget to serve it with injera, the traditional crêpe-like bread common in Ethiopia……..

Baked Butternut Squash
Baked butternut squash has a caramelized flavor, which is delicious if you use the cooked squash in soups and sauces. It’s simple to bake a butternut squash; just cut it in half and roast it in the oven…….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Vegetable Side Dish Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18028/side-dishes/vegetable/

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