One of America’s Favorites – Texas Toast

April 19, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A slice of Texas toast on top of a bagged loaf of bread.

Texas toast is a toasted bread with butter, and often garlic, that is often made from a type of packaged bread that has been sliced at double the average thickness of most sliced breads. The Texas toast loaf itself is often more squarish compared to most sliced breads which have a more curved side and top. While Texas toast bread can be used in the same manner as ordinary bread slices such as in sandwiches, it is especially useful for dishes involving liquids, such as barbecue sauce, or where extra thickness could improve the product, such as French toast. In addition, the often increased thickness of the slices of Texas toast lets it retain moisture and softness better than regular sliced bread. It is usually a white bread although there are whole wheat varieties. Producers of Texas toast in the United States include Franz Bakery, Mrs. Baird’s, and Safeway/Lucerne Foods.

Popular in Texas and its bordering states, Texas toast is often served as a side with southern-style dishes such as chicken fried steak, fried catfish, or BBQ. Texas toast can also be used when making toasted sandwiches.

The actual toast itself is made by putting butter or margarine on both sides of the bread and broiling or grilling it until it is a lightly golden brown. Depending on the recipe, the spread may contain seasonings including garlic, yielding a form of garlic bread. The toast may include cheese on one or both sides, similar to an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich.

The best-selling varieties of Texas toast are frozen breads, sold with a garlic or garlic and cheese spread which is applied immediately after baking. The best selling brands are the New York Brand of the T. Marzetti Company, Pepperidge Farm, and Coles.

Mozzarella and Monterey Jack cheese Texas toasts

Some recipes suggest regular or thick-sliced bread be cooked in a frying pan alongside fried steak, bacon, or other meat product in order to absorb the grease from the meat (cf. fried bread).

One claimant to the invention of Texas toast is Kirby’s Pig Stand. The once-thriving chain, whose heyday in the 1940s saw over 100 locations across the United States, also claims to be the originator of the onion ring. Texas toast may have been first created in 1946 at the Pig Stand in Denton, Texas, after a bakery order for thicker slices of bread resulted in slices too thick for the toaster and a cook, Wiley W. W. Cross, suggested buttering and grilling them as a solution. Another Pig Stand cook in Beaumont, Texas claimed he created the idea of grilling the bread. W.W.W. Cross is also credited for combining the Texas toast with chicken fried steak to create Kirby’s Pig Stand’s famous Chicken Fried Steak Sandwich.

Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Baked Potato and Glazed Apples

April 18, 2021 at 7:03 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Pork, pork chops | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Baked Potato and Glazed Apples

 

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast. Another windy day but sunny and 62 degrees out. Did a load of laundry after Breakfast. Later made a Pick Up order from Kroger. They were out of a lot of items, picked the order up at 2:00. Did some yard work also. For Dinner tonight it’s a Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Baked Potato and Glazed Apples.

 

While at Meijer I picked up a couple of huge Bone – In Pork Loin Chops To prepare my Chops I’ll need; The Cumin Spiced Rub which consists of 1 tbsp Roasted Cumin, 1 tsp Garlic Powder, 1 tsp Chili Powder, 1 teaspoon Sea Salt, 1/2 teaspoon Hungarian Paprika, 2 teaspoons Dried Oregano, and 1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper. To prepare it, preheat oven to 400°. Combine all the ingredients; rub it all over the pork chop. Let stand 20 minutes. Start by heating the Extra Virgin Olive oil in a Cast Iron Skillet over medium-high heat. Add pork to the pan; cook for 3 minutes, browning both sides. From the stove to the oven and bake at 400° for 20 minutes until the thermometer registered 150° (slightly pink), turning after 5 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before slicing. Fantastic combo of Spices, which makes one incredible Crust on the Chop with the inside being tender and moist! Love this seasoning on Pork!

 

For a side I baked a Russet Potato for a side with Steak. Seasoned with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley, and topped with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter and Daisy Light Sour Cream.

 

I also heated up some Bob Evan’s Glazed Apples, it comes in a microwavable container and is a quick and delicious way to have Glazed Apples. And Apples are perfect for any Pork dish! Quite a dinner tonight! Also baked a loaf of La Baguetterie Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread with any Dish. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pork Facts….
One serving of pork is 3 ounces, or about the size of a deck of cards, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. An image of the portion size is important because a thick pork chop can be twice that size and without realizing it you can eat double the calories. You’ll get 137 calories and 4 grams of fat from a 3-ounce pork chop. Pork is similar to chicken, with 3 ounces of chicken breast containing 140 calories and 3 grams of fat. A pork chop has 65 milligrams of cholesterol, compared to 72 grams in chicken breast, but they both have just 1 gram of saturated fat.

 

 

 

 

BOB EVANS SLICED GLAZED APPLES
A classic taste that will make everyone think you slaved in the kitchen, Bob Evans Sliced Glazed Apples are a perfect side dish or topping. Sold in the grocer’s refrigerated section, they’re ready to serve in less than 5 minutes.
BOB EVANS SLICED GLAZED APPLES
Serving Size 1/2 cup (116g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories: 140
Total Fat 2g
Saturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 35mg
Total Carbs 32g
Dietary Fiber 1g
Protein 2g
https://www.bobevansgrocery.com/products/bob-evans-sliced-glazed-apple

One of America’s Favorites – Danish Pastry

February 22, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A typical Spandauer-type Danish with apple filling and glazing

A Danish pastry or just Danish (especially in American English) is a multilayered, laminated sweet pastry in the viennoiserie tradition. The concept was brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers and has since developed into a Danish specialty. Like other viennoiserie pastries, such as croissants, they are a variant of puff pastry made of laminated yeast-leavened doughs, creating a layered texture.

Danish pastries were exported with immigrants to the United States, and are today popular around the world.

 

Danish pastry is made of yeast-leavened dough of wheat flour, milk, eggs, sugar and large amounts of butter or margarine.

A yeast dough is rolled out thinly, covered with thin slices of butter between the layers of dough, and then the dough is folded and rolled several times, creating 27 layers. If necessary, the dough is chilled between foldings to ease handling. The process of rolling, buttering, folding and chilling is repeated multiple times to create a multilayered dough that becomes airy and crispy on the outside, but also rich and buttery.

Butter is the traditional fat used in Danish pastry, but in industrial production, less expensive fats are often used, such as hydrogenated sunflower oil (known as “pastry fat” in the UK).

A common version of the pastry in Denmark, Norway, Finland, and Sweden.

In Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, the term for Danish pastry is wienerbrød/wienerbröd, “Viennese bread”. The same etymology is also the origin of the Finnish viineri. Danish pastry is referred to as facturas in some Spanish speaking countries. In Vienna, the Danish pastry, referring to Copenhagen, is called Kopenhagener Plunder or Dänischer Plunder.

 

The origin of the Danish pastry is often ascribed to a strike amongst bakery workers in Denmark in 1850. The strike forced bakery owners to hire workers from abroad, among them several Austrian bakers, who brought along new baking traditions and pastry recipes. The Austrian pastry of Plundergebäck soon became popular in Denmark and after the labour disputes ended, Danish bakers adopted the Austrian recipes, adjusting them to their own liking and traditions by increasing the amount of egg and fat for example. This development resulted in what is now known as the Danish pastry.

One of the baking techniques and traditions that the Austrian bakers brought with them was the Viennese lamination technique. Due to such novelties the Danes called the pastry technique “wienerbrød” and, as mentioned above, that name is still in use in Northern Europe today. At that time, almost all baked goods in Denmark were given exotic names.

 

 

Danish pastries as consumed in Denmark have different shapes and names. Some are topped with chocolate, pearl sugar, glacé icing and/or slivered nuts and they may be stuffed with a variety of ingredients such as jam or preserves (usually apple or prune), remonce, marzipan and/or custard. Shapes are numerous, including circles with filling in the middle (known in Denmark as “Spandauers”), figure-eights, spirals (known as snails), and the pretzel-like kringles.

 

A cinnamon Danish with chocolate and nuts from a bakery in Denmark

In Sweden, Danish pastry is typically made in the Spandauer-style, often with vanilla custard.

In the UK, various ingredients such as jam, custard, apricots, cherries, raisins, flaked almonds, pecans or caramelized toffee are placed on or within sections of divided dough, which is then baked. Cardamom is often added to increase the aromatic sense of sweetness.

In the US, Danishes are typically given a topping of fruit or sweet baker’s cheese prior to baking. Danishes with nuts on them are also popular there and in Sweden, where chocolate spritzing and powdered sugar are also often added.

In Argentina, they are usually filled with dulce de leche or dulce de membrillo.

 

A slice of an American apple crumb Danish

Danish pastry was brought to the United States by Danish immigrants. Lauritz C. Klitteng of Læsø popularized “Danish pastry” in the US around 1915–1920. According to Klitteng, he made Danish pastry for the wedding of President Woodrow Wilson in December 1915. Klitteng toured the world to promote his product and was featured in such 1920s periodicals as the National Baker, the Bakers’ Helper, and the Bakers’ Weekly. Klitteng briefly had his own Danish Culinary Studio at 146 Fifth Avenue in New York City.

Herman Gertner owned a chain of New York City restaurants and had brought Klitteng to New York to sell Danish pastry. Gertner’s obituary appeared in the January 23, 1962 New York Times:

“At one point during his career Mr. Gertner befriended a Danish baker who convinced him that Danish pastry might be well received in New York. Mr. Gertner began serving the pastry in his restaurant and it immediately was a success.”

 

 

Broiled Lobster Tail, Sea Salt Rubbed Buffalo Tri Tip Steaks and Baked Steak Fries

February 15, 2021 at 7:04 PM | Posted in Luke's Lobster, Ore - Ida, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Broiled Lobster Tail, Sea Salt Rubbed Buffalo Tri Tip Steaks and Baked Steak Fries

 

For Breakfast this morning I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin and topped it with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. I also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Woke up to a couple of inches of new snow. But that is only the start of it! They say we will have 9-11 inches of snow by Tuesday morning! Add that to 4 or 5 inches we had on the ground and you’re talking a lot of snow, especially for this area. But nothing you can do but sit back and wait. I just wish we weren’t living on a hill and the driveway wasn’t a hill it’s self. None of it good for a guy in a wheelchair! Enough rambling, for Dinner tonight I prepared Broiled Lobster Tail, Sea Salt Rubbed Buffalo Tri Tip Steaks and Baked Steak Fries.

 

Mom loves Lobster so I ordered a box of 8 1/4 lb Lobster Tails from Luke’s Lobster. Luke’s is where I had ordered the Lobster Rolls from, which were incredible! I was hoping to get them the day before her Birthday last Friday but they didn’t arrive until late Saturday. So I’m preparing a couple of them tonight. They were frozen so I had laid a couple of them in the fridge to thaw overnight.

 

To prepare them I used a sharp knife, halve each lobster tail lengthwise, cutting almost all the way through the soft side, and pulled gently at each side to laid the lobster flat in a small boiler pan. Next I heated the broiler to 450. Place lobster tails seasoned side up. Cooked them until the meat became opaque white and the shell turned bright red, cooked for about 9 minutes. Brushed with melted butter and they were ready to eat. They were so delicious and had such good flavor. We’ll be having these again, we have 6 left!

 

Then I had ordered a couple of packages of Wild Idea Buffalo – JILL’S SEA SALT RUBBED TRI-TIP STEAKS while they were on sale. Having a package tonight for Dinner. I had them in the freezer and sat them in the fridge to thaw overnight. It comes packaged as 2 – 4 oz. steaks per package and it’s already Seasoned with Organic: Olive Oil, Sea Salt, Lemon Juice, Black Pepper, Sage, Thyme, Rosemary, Garlic, and Onion Powder.

 

To prepare it I preheated the oven to 400°. In a Cast Iron Skillet that I sprayed with Pam Cooking Spray and added a tablespoon of Extra Light Olive Oil to, I heated it over medium high heat. When ready I added my Steaks to it. I cooked the Steaks 1 minute each side. I just wanted a light sear on both sides. Then I moved the Skillet on to the preheated Oven and Roasted it for about 4 minutes. Removed the Skillet from the Oven and placed the Steaks on a plate and let them rest for 5 minutes before cutting. The Tri -Tip Steak was super tender and juicy. I had cooked to a medium rare and it came perfect! Topped it with a side of Sauteed Mushrooms.

 

For a side I baked some Ore Ida Steak Fries and had a side of Hunt’s Ketchup for dipping. For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn with a Diet Peach Snapple to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke’s Lobster – Lobster Tail Pack – 8 Tails
This kit features 8 lobster tails, and tangy lemon garlic marinade (on the side) – perfect for stovetop or outdoor grilling. Our lobster tails are flash frozen using state of the art techniques to preserve freshness and quality. Enjoy lobster shipped from Maine to anywhere in the US!
Included in pack:

– 8 Frozen Lobster Tails (8 tails total, each about 1/4 lb)

– Lemon Garlic Marinade Packets

Tail directions:

1 – Thaw lobster tails in the fridge for about 24 hours before you plan to use them.
2 – Using a sharp knife, halve each lobster tail lengthwise, cutting almost all the way through the soft side, and use your hands to pull gently at each side to lay the lobster flat.
3 – Place split lobster tails on a flat surface.
4 – Heat your broiler to 450-500. Place lobster tails seasoned side up. Cook until the meat becomes opaque white and the shell turns bright red, or for about 8-10 minutes.
5 – Brush with melted butter and serve immediately.

 

 

WILD IDEA BUFFALO – JILL’S SEA SALT RUBBED TRI-TIP STEAKS (2-4 OZ. STEAKS)
This pre-seasoned steak is full of flavor with a hint of citrus and herbs. And, it’s portion perfect, with two 4 oz. steaks per 8 oz. package.

Ingredients: 100% Grass-Fed Buffalo, Organic: Olive Oil, Sea Salt, Lemon Juice, Black Pepper, Sage, Thyme, Rosemary, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder
https://wildideabuffalo.com/products/jills-sea-salt-rubbed-tri-tip-steaks-2-4-oz-steaks

Lobster Rolls and Potato Chips

February 2, 2021 at 7:31 PM | Posted in Lobster, Luke's Lobster, seafood | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Lobster Rolls with Potato Chips

 

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast this morning. 31 degrees and sunny, wind chill in the low 20’s. I have a Hoveround Mobility Chair that I use here at and around the house. Well Medicare makes you get a new one every 5 years. There was a glitch in Medicare approving it over the type of seat. But they finally approved it. A big thank you to my Doctor and Hoveround for the time they spent on getting this Medicare approved! Then at about 10:30 I took my Mom to get her Driver License renewed. Mom is 93 next week and she is very hard of hearing. She was really worried she would fail the hearing test. But she passed and everything is fine! So good news today around our house! For Dinner tonight I prepared Lobster Rolls with Potato Chips.

 

I had purchased the Lobster from Luke’s Lobster (https://www.lukeslobster.com/) out of Maine a while back. We used 1/2 the order a few weeks ago and I’m preparing the other half for Dinner tonight!

 

To prepare the Lobster I took a small skillet, sprayed it with Pam Cooking Spray and added a tablespoon of Blue Bonnet Light Butter, and heated it on medium low. As the Butter was melting I increased the heat to in between low and medium heat. Let it heat for 2 minutes and added the Lobster Chunks. Heated it for 2 minutes, stirring several times. Removed it from the heat and put the Lobster in to a bowl. Then added a 1/2 tsp of Lemon Juice, a tsp of Kraft Light Mayo w/Olive Oil, and seasoned it with about 4 pinches of the Luke’s Seasoning. I’ll be using Aunt Millie’s Reduced Calorie Whole Wheat Buns to serve my Lobster on. I topped them with just a light coat of melted Butter and served! Wow, what a Lobster Roll! Huge Chunks of Lobster with that hint of Lemon, Butter, and Luke’s Seasoning. Lobster maybe pricey but worth every cent. The Lobster Meat tasted so Fresh and Sweet. We will be purchasing more from Luke’s Lobster again! Also the Luke’s Lobster arrives Frozen in secure Packaging along with a ship date of your choice!

We had some Mike Sell’s Reduced Fat Chips with the Lobster Rolls. Later for Dessert a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped a dab of Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke’s Lobster
Luke’s Lobster first opened its doors in the East Village in 2009. We now bring traceable, sustainable seafood to guests across the country. We work directly with fishermen to hand pick the best seafood, bring it straight to our own seafood company and then ship directly to our shacks. Cutting out the middleman means better tasting lobster, crab and shrimp for you to enjoy and a fairer price for our fishermen.
https://www.lukeslobster.com/

 

 

 

Lobster Roll Bundle – Serves 8

This bundle includes 2lbs of Lobster Meat with Luke’s Seasoning, plus a pack of 8 New England-style, split-top buns – enough to make 8 perfect Luke’s Lobster rolls. Our lobster meat is flash frozen using liquid nitrogen to preserve freshness and quality. Enjoy lobster shipped from Maine to anywhere in the US!

Ingredients
Lobster Meat with Seasoning Ingredients: Lobster, Water, Seasoning Packet (spices, including celery seed powder, sea salt, garlic powder), Salt.
https://shop.lukeslobster.com/collections/shop-lukes/products/lobster-roll-bundle-4-packs-lobster-meat-with-lukes-seasoning-pack-of-buns

Lobster Rolls and Potato Chips

December 31, 2020 at 6:58 PM | Posted in Lobster, Luke's Lobster | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Lobster Rolls with Potato Chips

 

 

The last day of 2020, finally! We woke up to about 1/2 inch on the ground and 22 degrees. So to heat the morning up I made us a good Breakfast. I prepared some Glier’s Goetta, Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash Browns, Scrambled Eggs, Pillsbury Flaky Biscuits, and a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Good start to the last day! Did a load of laundry and some light house cleaning. Then it was a day computer and TV. Relaxing day. For Dinner tonight for the first time, Lobster Rolls with Potato Chips.

 

I purchased the Lobster from Luke’s Lobster (https://www.lukeslobster.com/) out of Maine. I read about Luke’s from a blog that featured the Lobster Rolls that I’m preparing tonight. I purchased the Luke’s Lobster Roll Bundle – Serves 8. It comes frozen, 2 packages of 1 lb. each of Lobster Pieces (Chunks), an 8 pack of frozen Split Top Rolls, and a package of Luke’s Seasoning. I’m drooling while writing this! I laid 1 of the packages of Lobster and 4 of the Split Top Rolls in the fridge overnight to thaw.

 

To prepare the Lobster I took a small skillet, sprayed it with Pam Cooking Spray and added a tablespoon of Blue Bonnet Light Butter, and heated it on medium low. As the Butter was melting I increased the heat to in between low and medium heat. Let it heat for 2 minutes and added the Lobster Chunks. Heated it for 2 minutes, stirring several times. Removed it from the heat and put the Lobster in to a bowl. Then added a 1/2 tsp of Lemon Juice, a tsp of Kraft Light Mayo w/Olive Oil, and seasoned it with about 4 pinches of the Luke’s Seasoning. Set aside and prepare the Rolls.

 

In another small skillet I heated the Rolls up. Heated the skillet on medium low heat. Added the Rolls on both sides for about 2 minutes and removed the Rolls on to plates. I spread the inside of the Rolls with a bit of the Mayo. Then filled each Split Roll with the now Chilled Lobster. I topped them with just a light coat of melted Butter and served! Wow, what a Lobster Roll! Huge Chunks of Lobster with that hint of Lemon, Butter, and Luke’s Seasoning. Lobster maybe pricey but worth every cent. The Lobster Meat tasted so Fresh and Sweet. We will be purchasing more from Luke’s Lobster again! Also the Luke’s Lobster arrives Frozen insecure Packaging along with a ship date of your choice!

 

We served the with some Mike Sell’s Reduced Fat Chips. Later for a Dessert/Snack a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Snyder’s Pretzels with a Diet Peach Snapple to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Luke’s Lobster
Luke’s Lobster first opened its doors in the East Village in 2009. We now bring traceable, sustainable seafood to guests across the country. We work directly with fishermen to hand pick the best seafood, bring it straight to our own seafood company and then ship directly to our shacks. Cutting out the middleman means better tasting lobster, crab and shrimp for you to enjoy and a fairer price for our fishermen.
https://www.lukeslobster.com/

 

 

 

Lobster Roll Bundle – Serves 8

This bundle includes 2lbs of Lobster Meat with Luke’s Seasoning, plus a pack of 8 New England-style, split-top buns – enough to make 8 perfect Luke’s Lobster rolls. Our lobster meat is flash frozen using liquid nitrogen to preserve freshness and quality. Enjoy lobster shipped from Maine to anywhere in the US!

Ingredients
Lobster Meat with Seasoning Ingredients: Lobster, Water, Seasoning Packet (spices, including celery seed powder, sea salt, garlic powder), Salt.
https://shop.lukeslobster.com/collections/shop-lukes/products/lobster-roll-bundle-4-packs-lobster-meat-with-lukes-seasoning-pack-of-buns

One of America’s Favorites – Soufflé

December 28, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A chocolate soufflé

A soufflé is a baked egg-based dish originating in France in the early eighteenth century. Combined with various other ingredients it can be served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to blow”, “to breathe”, “to inflate” or “to puff”.

The earliest mention of the soufflé is attributed to French master cook Vincent La Chapelle, in the early eighteenth century. The development and popularization of the soufflé is usually traced to French chef Marie-Antoine Carême in the early nineteenth century.

 

Soufflés are typically prepared from two basic components:

1 – a flavored crème pâtissière, cream sauce or béchamel, or a purée as the base

Cheese soufflés

2 – egg whites beaten to a soft peak
The base provides the flavor and the egg whites provide the “lift”, or puffiness to the dish. Foods commonly used to flavor the base include herbs, cheese and vegetables for savory soufflés and jam, fruits, berries, chocolate, banana and lemon for dessert soufflés.

Soufflés are generally baked in individual ramekins of a few ounces or soufflé dishes of a few liters: these are typically glazed, flat-bottomed, round porcelain containers with unglazed bottoms, vertical or nearly vertical sides, and fluted exterior borders. The ramekin, or other baking vessel, may be coated with a thin film of butter to prevent the soufflé from sticking. Some preparations also include adding a coating of sugar, bread crumbs, or a grated hard cheese such as Parmesan inside the ramekin in addition to the butter; some cooks believe this allows the soufflé to rise more easily.

After being cooked, a soufflé is puffed up and fluffy, and it will generally fall after 5 or 10 minutes (as risen dough does). It may be served with a sauce atop the soufflé, such as a sweet dessert sauce, or with a sorbet or ice-cream on the side. When served, the top of a soufflé may be punctured with serving utensils to separate it into individual servings. This can also enable a sauce to integrate into the dish.

A chocolate soufflé with lava center served with ice cream

 

There are a number of both savory and sweet soufflé flavor variations. Savory soufflés often include cheese, and vegetables such as spinach, carrot and herbs, and may sometimes incorporate poultry, bacon, ham, or seafood for a more substantial dish. Sweet soufflés may be based on a chocolate or fruit sauce (lemon or raspberry, for example), and are often served with a dusting of powdered sugar. Frugal recipes sometimes emphasize the possibilities for making soufflés from leftovers.

A soufflé may be served alone or with ice cream, fruit, or a sauce.

Apple soufflé is made by lining a cake tin with pureed rice that has been boiled in sweetened milk and baking it in this until it sets. The rice “border” is filled with thickened apple marmalade and whipped egg whites and baked until it rises.

 

 

Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Mashed Potatoes and Roasted Butternut Squash

August 9, 2020 at 7:12 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Pork, pork chops | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Mashed Potatoes and Roasted Butternut Squash

 

 

For Breakfast I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin that I topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. I also had my morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. I headed out to Walmart after Breakfast. A salute to Walmart and the safety precautions that they are taking to keep customers safe. Great Job Walmart! Stopped at McDonald’s and picked up Breakfast for Mom. I wasn’t too active today my Sinuses got the best of me today. For Dinner tonight I prepared Cumin Spiced Pork Chops w/ Mashed Potatoes and Roasted Butternut Squash.

 

I had picked some Pork Chops a while back at Meijer earlier in the week. To to prepare my Chops I’ll need; The Cumin Spiced Rub which consists of 1 tbsp Roasted Cumin, 1 tsp Garlic Powder, 1 tsp Chili Powder, 1 teaspoon Sea Salt, 1/2 teaspoon Hungarian Paprika, 2 teaspoons Dried Oregano, and 1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper. To prepare it, preheat the oven to 400°. Combine all the ingredients; rub it all over the pork chop. Let stand 20 minutes. Start by heating the Extra Virgin Olive oil in a Cast Iron Skillet over medium-high heat. Add Chops to pan; cook 3 minutes, browning both sides. From the stove to the oven and bake at 400° for 15 minutes until the thermometer registered 160°, turning after 5 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before slicing. Fantastic combo of Spices, which makes one incredible tasty Crust on the Chop with the inside being tender and moist! Love this seasoning on Pork!

 

For a side dish I prepared some Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes. Just microwave for 6 minutes and serve, just as good as homemade, if not better.

 

I wanted Green Beans but Mom wanted Butternut Squash, so you know what I prepared! So I prepared some Roasted Butternut Squash, easy recipe for some delicious Butternut Squash! I purchased 2 small packages of Diced Butternut Squash at Meijer. They sell packages of it that they dice up. This is a lot easier than peeling and seeding one yourself, especially if you don’t have a good knife to cut it. I’ll need; 1 package of Diced Butternut Squash, Walnut Pieces, Bacon Pieces, 1 tablespoons Extra Light Olive Oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick Grinder Sea Salt, and 1 teaspoon McCormick Grinder Peppercorn Medley. To prepare it; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the Squash on a sheet pan and drizzle with the Olive Oil, Salt, and Peppercorn and toss well. Arrange the squash in one layer and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the Squash is tender, turning once with a spatula. And done, very easy to prepare. With the small amount of Seasoning and Olive Oil, it really brings out the flavor of Butternut Squash! The Walnuts work perfect with the Squash.

I also prepared a small can of Pillsbury Crescent Rolls, one of Mom’s favorites. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pork Facts….
One serving of pork is 3 ounces, or about the size of a deck of cards, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. An image of the portion size is important because a thick pork chop can be twice that size and without realizing it you can eat double the calories. You’ll get 137 calories and 4 grams of fat from a 3-ounce pork chop. Pork is similar to chicken, with 3 ounces of chicken breast containing 140 calories and 3 grams of fat. A pork chop has 65 milligrams of cholesterol, compared to 72 grams in chicken breast, but they both have just 1 gram of saturated fat.

 

 

 

 

Butternut squash…………
Butternut squash, sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the blossom end. Wikipedia

Nutrition Facts
Amount Per 1 cup, cubes (140 g)
Calories 63
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 6 mg 0%
Potassium 493 mg 14%
Total Carbohydrate 16 g 5%
Dietary fiber 2.8 g 11%
Sugar 3.1 g
Protein 1.4 g

One of America’s Favorites – Pound Cake

June 1, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A pound cake with almonds

Pound cake is a type of cake traditionally made with a pound of each of four ingredients: flour, butter, eggs, and sugar. Pound cakes are generally baked in either a loaf pan or a Bundt mold, and served either dusted with powdered sugar, lightly glazed, or sometimes with a coat of icing.

It is believed that the pound cake is of northern European origin that dates back to the early 1700s. A recipe for pound cake is in the first U.S. cookbook, American Cookery, which was published in 1796.

Over time the ingredients for pound cake changed. Eliza Leslie, who wrote the 1851 edition of Direction for Cookery, used 10 eggs, beat them as lightly as possible, mixed them with a pound of flour, then added the juice of two lemons or three large oranges. This changed the flavor and texture of the cake. In the 2008 issue of Saveur, James Villas wrote that cake flour would not work in place of all-purpose flour because it lacks the strength to support the heavy batter.

An early variation on this cake replaced some of the flour with cornmeal made from dried corn (maize), which was then called Indian meal. A recipe for Indian pound cake was first published in 1828 by Eliza Leslie and later included in The Indian Meal Book, which was published in London in 1846, when people in Ireland were looking for alternatives to expensive wheat flour.

There are numerous variations on the traditional pound cake, with certain countries and regions having distinctive styles. These can include the addition of flavoring agents (such as vanilla extract or almond extract) or dried fruit (such as currants or dried cranberries), as well as alterations to the original recipe to change the characteristics of the resulting pound cake. For instance, baking soda or baking powder may be incorporated to induce leavening during baking, resulting in a less dense pound cake. A cooking oil (typically a vegetable oil) is sometimes substituted for some or all of the butter, which is intended to produce a moister cake. Sour cream pound cake is a popular variation in the United States, which involves the substitution of sour cream for some of the butter, which also is intended to produce a moister cake with a tangy flavor. Some of these variations may drastically change the texture and flavor of the pound cake, but the name pound cake is often still used. Some of the variations are described below.

Slices of pound cake

American South style
A traditional American pound cake would contain one pound each of flour, butter, eggs, and sugar. This recipe is quite popular in the cuisine of the Southern United States.

French style
In France, the pound cake is well known. The name of the pound cake “quatre-quarts”, means four quarters. There are equal weights in each of the four quarters. In tradition, the popular cake of the French region of Brittany, as its name implies, uses the same quantity of the four ingredients, but with no added fruit of any kind. However, the Caribbean parts of the world that speak French traditionally add rum to the ingredients for Christmas Eve or even mashed bananas for extra moisture. In some cases the French might have beaten egg whites instead of whole eggs to lighten the batter. Other variants include adding chocolate or lemon juice for flavor.

Mexican style
In Mexico, the pound cake is called panqué. The basic recipe of Mexican panqué is much like the traditional U.S. recipe. Most common variants are panqué con nueces (pound cake with walnuts) and panqué con pasas (pound cake with raisins).

Colombian and Venezuelan style
Ponqué is the Colombian and Venezuelan version of the pound cake: the term ponqué is itself a Spanish phonetic approximation of pound-cake. The ponqué is essentially a wine-drenched cake with a cream or sugar coating, and it is very popular at birthdays, weddings and other social celebrations.

Traditional German Osterlamm which often is made of Eischwerteig mit Fett

German style
The German Eischwerteig mit Fett (roughly “egg-weight dough with fat”) is a recipe very similar to the pound cake, but thought of in multiples of the weight of the average egg used. For example, in a German cooks vocational school book from the 1980s the basic recipe for such a cake baked in a 26 cm spring form tin is given as four eggs, 3 egg-weights of butter, 4 egg-weights of sugar, three egg weights of flour and one egg-weight of starch. If you add it all up, it is close to the English pound of each and the French four equal quarters.

Thinking of the dough in terms of base egg-weight makes it a very versatile base recipe which can be easily scaled to different sized tins by increasing or decreasing the number of eggs and the dependent ingredient weights. And so, with the simple addition of nuts, chocolate, dried fruits and alcohols, and the use of different shapes and sizes of tins, a wide variety of traditional German cakes are made. For example, this dough or a minor variation of it is often used to make cakes made in a loaf tin (Orangenkuchen – orange cake; Nußkuchen- hazelnut cake), marbled cakes in a bundt tin (Marmorkuchen ) and other flavor combinations in shaped tins (Falscher Rehrücken – fake venison saddle with bitter chocolate and almonds, Osterlamm – Easter Lamb with vanilla and rum.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Oysters Rockefeller

May 11, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Oysters Rockefeller consists of oysters on the half-shell that have been topped with a rich sauce of butter, parsley and other green herbs, and bread crumbs, then baked or broiled. Lemon wedges are the typical garnish.

Oysters Rockefeller topped with bacon

The original sauce may or may not include spinach, a popular shortcut for achieving the dish’s signature bright green color. Many contemporary adaptations use diced oysters instead of whole. Also, diced bacon often appears as a non-traditional topping in addition to or in place of the sauce.

The dish appears as a popular restaurant appetizer throughout the United States and is served as a brunch item in the South.

Oysters Rockefeller was created in 1889 at the New Orleans restaurant Antoine’s by Jules Alciatore, son of founder Antoine Alciatore. Jules developed the dish due to a shortage of escargot, substituting the locally available oysters. The recipe remains unchanged, with an estimated three and a half million orders having been served.

The dish was named Oysters Rockefeller after John D. Rockefeller, the then-wealthiest American, for its extreme richness. It consists of oysters on the half-shell topped with a green sauce and bread crumbs, then baked or broiled. Though the original sauce recipe is a secret, it includes a purée of a number of green vegetables that may include spinach. Similar versions of the dish have proliferated in New Orleans, with none noted as an accurate duplicate.

Chef Alton Brown states in the “Shell Game” episode of his Food Network series Good Eats that Alciatore took his recipe to the grave and any version since is merely an assumption. While many achieve the sauce’s trademark green color simply using spinach, Antoine’s chefs have repeatedly denied the dish contains it. A 1986 laboratory analysis by William Poundstone in Bigger Secrets indicated its primary ingredients were parsley, pureed and strained celery, scallions or chives (indistinguishable in a food lab), olive oil, and capers.

Pernod Fils absinthe liqueur, a popular Victorian-era inclusion that fell out of production in 1915, is a possible original ingredient. Malcolm Hébert, native Louisianan, cookbook author and wine and food editor, decries spinach, and adds the anise-flavored liqueur Herbsaint. It is not possible that Herbsaint was in the original recipe, as Herbsaint debuted in 1934, nor Pernod Fils, which did not appear until after the First World War.

 

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