Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Mashed Potatoes and Roasted Butternut Squash

August 9, 2020 at 7:12 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Pork, pork chops | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Mashed Potatoes and Roasted Butternut Squash

 

 

For Breakfast I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin that I topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. I also had my morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. I headed out to Walmart after Breakfast. A salute to Walmart and the safety precautions that they are taking to keep customers safe. Great Job Walmart! Stopped at McDonald’s and picked up Breakfast for Mom. I wasn’t too active today my Sinuses got the best of me today. For Dinner tonight I prepared Cumin Spiced Pork Chops w/ Mashed Potatoes and Roasted Butternut Squash.

 

I had picked some Pork Chops a while back at Meijer earlier in the week. To to prepare my Chops I’ll need; The Cumin Spiced Rub which consists of 1 tbsp Roasted Cumin, 1 tsp Garlic Powder, 1 tsp Chili Powder, 1 teaspoon Sea Salt, 1/2 teaspoon Hungarian Paprika, 2 teaspoons Dried Oregano, and 1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper. To prepare it, preheat the oven to 400°. Combine all the ingredients; rub it all over the pork chop. Let stand 20 minutes. Start by heating the Extra Virgin Olive oil in a Cast Iron Skillet over medium-high heat. Add Chops to pan; cook 3 minutes, browning both sides. From the stove to the oven and bake at 400° for 15 minutes until the thermometer registered 160°, turning after 5 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before slicing. Fantastic combo of Spices, which makes one incredible tasty Crust on the Chop with the inside being tender and moist! Love this seasoning on Pork!

 

For a side dish I prepared some Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes. Just microwave for 6 minutes and serve, just as good as homemade, if not better.

 

I wanted Green Beans but Mom wanted Butternut Squash, so you know what I prepared! So I prepared some Roasted Butternut Squash, easy recipe for some delicious Butternut Squash! I purchased 2 small packages of Diced Butternut Squash at Meijer. They sell packages of it that they dice up. This is a lot easier than peeling and seeding one yourself, especially if you don’t have a good knife to cut it. I’ll need; 1 package of Diced Butternut Squash, Walnut Pieces, Bacon Pieces, 1 tablespoons Extra Light Olive Oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick Grinder Sea Salt, and 1 teaspoon McCormick Grinder Peppercorn Medley. To prepare it; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the Squash on a sheet pan and drizzle with the Olive Oil, Salt, and Peppercorn and toss well. Arrange the squash in one layer and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the Squash is tender, turning once with a spatula. And done, very easy to prepare. With the small amount of Seasoning and Olive Oil, it really brings out the flavor of Butternut Squash! The Walnuts work perfect with the Squash.

I also prepared a small can of Pillsbury Crescent Rolls, one of Mom’s favorites. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pork Facts….
One serving of pork is 3 ounces, or about the size of a deck of cards, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. An image of the portion size is important because a thick pork chop can be twice that size and without realizing it you can eat double the calories. You’ll get 137 calories and 4 grams of fat from a 3-ounce pork chop. Pork is similar to chicken, with 3 ounces of chicken breast containing 140 calories and 3 grams of fat. A pork chop has 65 milligrams of cholesterol, compared to 72 grams in chicken breast, but they both have just 1 gram of saturated fat.

 

 

 

 

Butternut squash…………
Butternut squash, sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the blossom end. Wikipedia

Nutrition Facts
Amount Per 1 cup, cubes (140 g)
Calories 63
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.1 g 0%
Saturated fat 0 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.1 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 6 mg 0%
Potassium 493 mg 14%
Total Carbohydrate 16 g 5%
Dietary fiber 2.8 g 11%
Sugar 3.1 g
Protein 1.4 g

One of America’s Favorites – Pound Cake

June 1, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A pound cake with almonds

Pound cake is a type of cake traditionally made with a pound of each of four ingredients: flour, butter, eggs, and sugar. Pound cakes are generally baked in either a loaf pan or a Bundt mold, and served either dusted with powdered sugar, lightly glazed, or sometimes with a coat of icing.

It is believed that the pound cake is of northern European origin that dates back to the early 1700s. A recipe for pound cake is in the first U.S. cookbook, American Cookery, which was published in 1796.

Over time the ingredients for pound cake changed. Eliza Leslie, who wrote the 1851 edition of Direction for Cookery, used 10 eggs, beat them as lightly as possible, mixed them with a pound of flour, then added the juice of two lemons or three large oranges. This changed the flavor and texture of the cake. In the 2008 issue of Saveur, James Villas wrote that cake flour would not work in place of all-purpose flour because it lacks the strength to support the heavy batter.

An early variation on this cake replaced some of the flour with cornmeal made from dried corn (maize), which was then called Indian meal. A recipe for Indian pound cake was first published in 1828 by Eliza Leslie and later included in The Indian Meal Book, which was published in London in 1846, when people in Ireland were looking for alternatives to expensive wheat flour.

There are numerous variations on the traditional pound cake, with certain countries and regions having distinctive styles. These can include the addition of flavoring agents (such as vanilla extract or almond extract) or dried fruit (such as currants or dried cranberries), as well as alterations to the original recipe to change the characteristics of the resulting pound cake. For instance, baking soda or baking powder may be incorporated to induce leavening during baking, resulting in a less dense pound cake. A cooking oil (typically a vegetable oil) is sometimes substituted for some or all of the butter, which is intended to produce a moister cake. Sour cream pound cake is a popular variation in the United States, which involves the substitution of sour cream for some of the butter, which also is intended to produce a moister cake with a tangy flavor. Some of these variations may drastically change the texture and flavor of the pound cake, but the name pound cake is often still used. Some of the variations are described below.

Slices of pound cake

American South style
A traditional American pound cake would contain one pound each of flour, butter, eggs, and sugar. This recipe is quite popular in the cuisine of the Southern United States.

French style
In France, the pound cake is well known. The name of the pound cake “quatre-quarts”, means four quarters. There are equal weights in each of the four quarters. In tradition, the popular cake of the French region of Brittany, as its name implies, uses the same quantity of the four ingredients, but with no added fruit of any kind. However, the Caribbean parts of the world that speak French traditionally add rum to the ingredients for Christmas Eve or even mashed bananas for extra moisture. In some cases the French might have beaten egg whites instead of whole eggs to lighten the batter. Other variants include adding chocolate or lemon juice for flavor.

Mexican style
In Mexico, the pound cake is called panqué. The basic recipe of Mexican panqué is much like the traditional U.S. recipe. Most common variants are panqué con nueces (pound cake with walnuts) and panqué con pasas (pound cake with raisins).

Colombian and Venezuelan style
Ponqué is the Colombian and Venezuelan version of the pound cake: the term ponqué is itself a Spanish phonetic approximation of pound-cake. The ponqué is essentially a wine-drenched cake with a cream or sugar coating, and it is very popular at birthdays, weddings and other social celebrations.

Traditional German Osterlamm which often is made of Eischwerteig mit Fett

German style
The German Eischwerteig mit Fett (roughly “egg-weight dough with fat”) is a recipe very similar to the pound cake, but thought of in multiples of the weight of the average egg used. For example, in a German cooks vocational school book from the 1980s the basic recipe for such a cake baked in a 26 cm spring form tin is given as four eggs, 3 egg-weights of butter, 4 egg-weights of sugar, three egg weights of flour and one egg-weight of starch. If you add it all up, it is close to the English pound of each and the French four equal quarters.

Thinking of the dough in terms of base egg-weight makes it a very versatile base recipe which can be easily scaled to different sized tins by increasing or decreasing the number of eggs and the dependent ingredient weights. And so, with the simple addition of nuts, chocolate, dried fruits and alcohols, and the use of different shapes and sizes of tins, a wide variety of traditional German cakes are made. For example, this dough or a minor variation of it is often used to make cakes made in a loaf tin (Orangenkuchen – orange cake; Nußkuchen- hazelnut cake), marbled cakes in a bundt tin (Marmorkuchen ) and other flavor combinations in shaped tins (Falscher Rehrücken – fake venison saddle with bitter chocolate and almonds, Osterlamm – Easter Lamb with vanilla and rum.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Oysters Rockefeller

May 11, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Oysters Rockefeller consists of oysters on the half-shell that have been topped with a rich sauce of butter, parsley and other green herbs, and bread crumbs, then baked or broiled. Lemon wedges are the typical garnish.

Oysters Rockefeller topped with bacon

The original sauce may or may not include spinach, a popular shortcut for achieving the dish’s signature bright green color. Many contemporary adaptations use diced oysters instead of whole. Also, diced bacon often appears as a non-traditional topping in addition to or in place of the sauce.

The dish appears as a popular restaurant appetizer throughout the United States and is served as a brunch item in the South.

Oysters Rockefeller was created in 1889 at the New Orleans restaurant Antoine’s by Jules Alciatore, son of founder Antoine Alciatore. Jules developed the dish due to a shortage of escargot, substituting the locally available oysters. The recipe remains unchanged, with an estimated three and a half million orders having been served.

The dish was named Oysters Rockefeller after John D. Rockefeller, the then-wealthiest American, for its extreme richness. It consists of oysters on the half-shell topped with a green sauce and bread crumbs, then baked or broiled. Though the original sauce recipe is a secret, it includes a purée of a number of green vegetables that may include spinach. Similar versions of the dish have proliferated in New Orleans, with none noted as an accurate duplicate.

Chef Alton Brown states in the “Shell Game” episode of his Food Network series Good Eats that Alciatore took his recipe to the grave and any version since is merely an assumption. While many achieve the sauce’s trademark green color simply using spinach, Antoine’s chefs have repeatedly denied the dish contains it. A 1986 laboratory analysis by William Poundstone in Bigger Secrets indicated its primary ingredients were parsley, pureed and strained celery, scallions or chives (indistinguishable in a food lab), olive oil, and capers.

Pernod Fils absinthe liqueur, a popular Victorian-era inclusion that fell out of production in 1915, is a possible original ingredient. Malcolm Hébert, native Louisianan, cookbook author and wine and food editor, decries spinach, and adds the anise-flavored liqueur Herbsaint. It is not possible that Herbsaint was in the original recipe, as Herbsaint debuted in 1934, nor Pernod Fils, which did not appear until after the First World War.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Toast

May 4, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A slice of bread, untoasted (left) and toasted (right)

Toast is a form of bread that has been browned by exposure to radiant heat. This browning is the result of a Maillard reaction, altering the flavor of the bread and making it firmer so that it is easier to spread toppings on it. Toasting is a common method of making stale bread more palatable. Bread is often toasted using a toaster, but toaster ovens are also used. Though many types of bread can be toasted the most commonly used is “sliced bread”, referring to bread that is already sliced and bagged upon purchase and may be white, brown, multigrain, etc.

Toast is commonly eaten with butter or margarine, and sweetened toppings, such as jam or jelly. Regionally, savory spreads, such as peanut butter or yeast extracts, may also be popular. When buttered, toast may also be served as an accompaniment to savory dishes, especially soups or stews, or topped with heartier ingredients like eggs or baked beans as a light meal. Toast is a common breakfast food. While slices of bread are most common, bagels and English muffins are also toasted.

Scientific studies in the early 2000s found that toast may contain carcinogens (acrylamide) caused by the browning process.

In a modern home kitchen, the usual method of toasting bread is by the use of a toaster, an electrical appliance made for that purpose. To use a modern toaster, sliced bread is placed into the narrow slots on the top of the toaster, the toaster is tuned to the correct setting (some may have more elaborate settings than others) and a lever on the front or side is pushed down. The toast is ready when the lever pops up along with the toast. If the bread is insufficiently toasted, the lever can be pressed down again.

A classic two-slot toaster

Bread toasted in a conventional toaster can “sweat” when it is served (i.e. water collects on the surface of the cooled toast). This occurs because moisture in the bread becomes steam while being toasted due to heat and when cooled the steam condenses into water droplets on the surface of the bread.

It can also be toasted by a conveyor toaster, which device is often used in hotels, restaurants, and other food service locations. It works by having one heating element on the top and one on the bottom with a metal conveyor belt in the middle which carries the toast between the two heating elements. This allows toast to be made consistently as more slices can be added at any time without waiting for previous ones to pop up.

Bread can also be toasted under a grill (or broiler), in an open oven, or lying on an oven rack. This “oven toast” is usually buttered before toasting. Toaster ovens are special small appliances made for toasting bread or for heating small amounts of other foods.

Bread can also be toasted by holding it near but not directly over an open flame, such as a campfire or fireplace; special toasting utensils (e.g. toasting forks) are made for this purpose. Before the invention of modern cooking appliances such as toasters and grills, bread has been produced in ovens for millennia, toast can be made in the same oven.

Many brands of ready sliced bread are available, some of which specifically market their suitability for toasting.

Left Toast with butter and vegemite. Right With butter and strawberry jam.

In modern days, toast is most commonly eaten with butter or margarine spread over it, and may be served with preserves, spreads, or other toppings in addition to or instead of butter. Toast with jam or marmalade is popular. A few other condiments that can be enjoyed with toast are chocolate spread, cream cheese, and peanut butter. Yeast extracts such as Marmite in the UK, New Zealand and South Africa, and Vegemite in Australia are national traditions. Some sandwiches, such as the BLT, call for toast to be used rather than bread.

Toast is an important component of many breakfasts, and is also important in some traditional bland specialty diets for people with gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea.

In the United Kingdom, toast is part of a traditional breakfast: it’s often incorporated in a full breakfast or eaten with baked beans. A dish popular with children there is a soft-boiled egg eaten with toast soldiers at breakfast. Strips of toast (the soldiers) are dipped into the runny yolk of a boiled egg through a hole made in the top of the eggshell, and eaten.

In southern Sri Lanka, it is common for toast to be paired with a curry soup and mint tea. In Japan, people like to toast thick slices of bread. Toast became a staple dish in Japan after World War 2, especially after it was introduced in school lunches. Street vendors in South Korea serve toast with a variety of toppings, usually fried eggs, vegetables and slices of meat, topped with sauces. Korean toast is to be eaten as a sandwich.

By 2013, “artisanal toast” had become a significant food trend in upscale American cities like San Francisco, where some commentators decried the increasing number of restaurants and bakeries selling freshly made toast at what was perceived to be an unreasonably high price.

Avocado toast is seen as a symbol of millennial culture.

Cheese and marshmallows are also toasted by exposure to dry radiant heat. A toasted cheese sandwich features toasted cheese and toasted bread. Bagels, English muffins, Pop Tart pastries and crumpets are foods that can be toasted, too.

 

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Chile Custard Squares

February 3, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is Chile Custard Squares. Start your day off with this week’s recipe of Chile Custard Squares. Made using Eggs, Flour, Baking Powder, Monterey Jack Cheese, Cottage Cheese, Ortega Diced Green Chiles, Butter, and Tortilla Chips. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website where you’ll find a fantastic selection of recipes to please all tastes. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Chile Custard Squares
This tasty southwestern-style egg, chile and cheese casserole makes a great entrée for brunch or dinner.

Recipe Ingredients:
10 large eggs, beaten
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
4 cups shredded Monterey Jack or cheddar cheese
2 cups small curd cottage cheese
1 (7-ounce) can ORTEGA Diced Green Chiles
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 cups crushed tortilla chips

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 400°F (205°C).
2 – Combine eggs, flour and baking powder in medium bowl. Add butter, Monterey Jack cheese, cottage cheese and chiles and butter; stir well. Spoon into 13x9x2-inch baking pan. Top with tortilla chips.
3 – Bake for 15 minutes; reduce oven temperature to 350°F (175°C). Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cut into squares.

Makes 12 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/breakfast/chile_custard_squares_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Apple Dumpling

January 20, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

An apple dumpling is a baked pastry-wrapped apple. To prepare apple dumplings, apples are peeled, cored and sometimes quartered and placed on a portion of dough. The hole from the core may be filled with cinnamon, butter and sugar and sometimes dried fruit such as raisins, sultanas, or currants. The dough is folded over the apples and sealed. Sometimes a spiced sauce is poured over the dumplings which are then baked until tender; the sugar and butter create a sweet sauce. Apple dumplings can be served hot, cold, or room temperature for breakfast, dessert, or as a main dish.

An apple dumpling served with vanilla ice cream

Boiled apple dumplings are among the earliest of fruit puddings. They were eaten “at all social levels”. In 1726 Nicholas Amhurst complained about apple dumplings at Oxford, saying “nothing can be expected from only rot-gut small beer, and heavy apple-dumplings, but stupidity, sleepiness, and indolence. “Two recipes for apple dumplings were published in Hannah Glasse’s 1747 cookbook. In 1749–1750, when botanist Pehr Kalm traveled from New Jersey to Quebec, he reported having apple dumplings at every meal. In 1754 English agriculturalist William Ellis called them one of the most common foods among farmers, along with bacon and pickled pork.

Apple dumplings are typically made by wrapping a pastry crust around a peeled, cored, and sometimes quartered apple, sometimes stuffing the hollow from the core with butter, sugar, sometimes dried fruits such as raisins, sultanas, or currants, and spices, sealing the pastry, and pouring a spiced sauce over the top before baking or, in the case of older recipes, boiling. The earliest recipes refer to boiling, as few homes had ovens, while many later recipes call for baking. Sauces typically call for sugar or brown sugar and butter boiled with water, sometimes with sliced lemons or spices such as cinnamon added for flavor.

Apple dumplings are served for breakfast or other meals, as sides, or as dessert. They are served hot, warm or at room temperature, sometimes with milk, cream, whipped cream, custard, or ice cream. Each dumpling is an individual serving.

Apple dumplings are a common food in the northeastern United States, especially around Pennsylvania, where they are considered a “cultural staple”. Food historians trace this type of apple dumpling back to Glasse’s book. A common recipe among the Pennsylvania Dutch, it is often eaten as a breakfast item or dessert. It is sometimes served with cream, whipped cream, or ice cream.

In the US, September 17 is National Apple Dumpling Day. Annual apple dumpling festivals are held in the towns of Atwood, Illinois, Stuart, Virginia, and Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania.

 

Fried Haddock w/ Roasted Petite Potatoes and Roasted Asparagus

January 16, 2020 at 6:36 PM | Posted in fish, potatoes, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Fried Haddock w/ Roasted Petite Potatoes and Roasted Asparagus

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I had my morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. 36 degrees and partly cloudy outside today. After I had the Tea I headed to Meijer for a few items. Stopped by the Bank ATM and then by McDonald’s to pick up Breakfast for Mom. Back home did laundry and cleaned and straightened the Pantry. For Dinner tonight I prepared a Grilled Ham and Swiss on Sour Dough Bread w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

I was at Kroger the other morning and they had some great looking Haddock Fillets so I bought a couple. To prepare it I rinsed the fillets off in cold water and cut the fillet into 4 pieces. So to prepare them I seasoned them with just a bit of Sea Salt and put the pieces in a Hefty Zip Plastic Bag where I then added Zatarain’s Lemon Pepper Breading Mix. Shook until the pieces were well coated. Shook off the excess and pan fried them in Extra Light Olive Oil, frying them about 3 minutes per side until golden brown. Haddock and Zatarain’s Lemon Pepper Mix, the perfect combo. The Zatarain’s Breading and Seasonings are my favorites. I love this Haddock it cooks up so nice and easy and I love the flavor and how meaty it is.

 

For one side I prepared Roasted Petite Potatoes. Another item I came across at Kroger, a Baking Tin with Tri Colored Potatoes. 12 Petite Tri- Colored Potatoes that come in a ready to bake tin baking container. The Potatoes come with Butter, Salt, Pepper, and Parsley Flakes. So all I had to do was remove the lid and bake them at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Easy and delicious Potato side dish. I’ll buy more of these!

 

 

 

Then I also had Roasted Asparagus. I already had the oven heated for Potatoes at 400 degrees. As the Potatoes were finishing I added my Asparagus. To prepare the Asparagus I just needed Extra Light Olive Oil, McCormick Garlic Salt, McCormick Grinders of Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley. Rinse cleaned the Asparagus and cut the tough ends off of the Asparagus before Seasoning. Laid the Asparagus Spears out in a single layer on a foil lined baking sheet. First put some Extra Light Olive Oil across the Asparagus and then my Seasonings. Placed the pan in oven and cook for approximately 8 minutes. Topped it with a sprinkle of Kraft Reduced Fat Parmesan Cheese before serving. I also had a Buttered slice of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

Haddock
The haddock is a saltwater fish from the family Gadidae, the true cods, it is the only species in the monotypic genus Melanogrammus. – Wikipedia

Nutrition Facts
Haddock, cooked
Amount Per 1 fillet (150 g)
Calories 136
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.8 g 1%
Saturated fat 0.2 g 1%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.3 g
Monounsaturated fat 0.1 g
Trans fat 0 g
Cholesterol 99 mg 33%
Sodium 391 mg 16%
Potassium 527 mg 15%
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0%
Dietary fiber 0 g 0%
Sugar 0 g
Protein 30 g 60%

Herbed Corn on the Cob

December 31, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ve got a Diabetic Friendly Side Dish to pass along for everyone, Herbed Corn on the Cob. All you’ll need to make this recipe is Medium Size Ears of Corn, Butter, Mixed Herbs (such as basil, oregano, sage and rosemary),Salt, and Black Pepper. This dish is only 86 calories and 12 net carbs per serving (1 Ear of Corn). The recipe comes from the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more so be sure to check it out soon. You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management website, one of my favorite Magazines. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Herbed Corn on the Cob

Ingredients
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
1 teaspoon mixed dried herbs (such as basil, oregano, sage and rosemary)
1/8 teaspoon salt
Black pepper
4 medium ears corn (6 to 7 ounces each), husks removed

Directions
1 – Combine butter, herbs, salt, and pepper in small microwavable bowl. Microwave on MEDIUM (50%) 30 to 45 seconds or until butter is melted.

2 – With pastry brush, coat corn with butter mixture. Place corn on microwavable plate; microwave on HIGH 5 to 6 minutes. Turn; microwave on HIGH 5 to 6 minutes or until tender.

Yield: 4 servings.

Serving size: 1 ear corn.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 86 calories, Carbohydrates: 14 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 8 mg, Sodium: 106 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/herbed-corn-cob/


Subscribe
Diabetes Self-Management offers up-to-date, practical “how-to” information on nutrition, exercise, new drugs, medical advances, self-help, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.
Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

One of America’s Favorites – Pancakes

December 23, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A stack of blueberry pancakes

A pancake (or hotcake, griddlecake, or flapjack, not to be confused with oat bar flapjacks) is a flat cake, often thin and round, prepared from a starch-based batter that may contain eggs, milk and butter and cooked on a hot surface such as a griddle or frying pan, often frying with oil or butter. Archaeological evidence suggests that pancakes were probably the earliest and most widespread cereal food eaten in prehistoric societies.

The pancake’s shape and structure varies worldwide. In England, pancakes are often unleavened and resemble a crêpe. In North America, a leavening agent is used (typically baking powder) creating a thick fluffy pancake. A crêpe is a thin Breton pancake of French origin cooked on one or both sides in a special pan or crepe maker to achieve a lacelike network of fine bubbles. A well-known variation originating from southeast Europe is a palačinke, a thin moist pancake fried on both sides and filled with jam, cheese cream, chocolate, or ground walnuts, but many other fillings—sweet or savoury—can also be used.

When potato is used as a major portion of the batter, the result is a potato pancake. Commercially prepared pancake mixes are available in some countries. When buttermilk is used in place of or in addition to milk, the pancake develops a tart flavor and becomes known as a buttermilk pancake, which is common in Scotland and the US. Buckwheat flour can be used in a pancake batter, making for a type of buckwheat pancake, a category that includes Blini, Kaletez, Ploye, and Memil-buchimgae.

Silver dollar pancakes

Pancakes may be served at any time of the day with a variety of toppings or fillings but in America they are typically considered a breakfast food. Pancakes serve a similar function to waffles. In Britain and the Commonwealth, they are associated with Shrove Tuesday, commonly known as “Pancake Day”, when, historically, perishable ingredients had to be used up before the fasting period of Lent.

American and Canadian pancakes (sometimes called hotcakes, griddlecakes, or flapjacks) are usually served at breakfast, in a stack of two or three, topped with real or artificial maple syrup and butter. They are often served with other items such as bacon, toast, eggs or sausage. Other popular topping alternatives include jam, peanut butter, nuts, fruit, honey, powdered sugar, whipped cream, cane syrup, cinnamon and sugar, and molasses. In addition, when a pancake is occasionally served as a dessert, toppings such as ice cream, chocolate syrup, and various fruits are often used.

The thick batter contains eggs, flour, milk, and a leavening agent such as baking powder. The batter can have ingredients such as buttermilk, blueberries, strawberries, bananas, apples, chocolate chips, cheese, or sugar added. Spices such as cinnamon, vanilla and nutmeg can also be used. Yogurt may be used to give the pancakes a relatively moist consistency. Pancakes may be ⅓ inch thick and about 4 inches in diameter.

In the US, Mexico and Canada, the franchised restaurant chain International House of Pancakes (IHOP) serves pancakes all day. The Original Pancake House is another chain of pancake restaurants across the US, and Walker Brothers is a series of pancake houses in the Chicago area that developed as a franchised spin-off of The Original Pancake House.

Pancakes and syrup at a pancake feed event

The popularity of pancakes in Australia has spawned the Pancake Parlour and Pancakes on the Rocks franchised restaurants. In British Columbia and Alberta, Canada, the restaurant chain De Dutch serves Dutch and Flemish-style pannenkoeken.

Pancakes are traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday, which is known as “Pancake Day” in Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, and “Pancake Tuesday” in Ireland and Scotland. (Shrove Tuesday is better known in the United States, France, and other countries as Mardi Gras or Fat Tuesday.) Historically, pancakes were made on Shrove Tuesday so that the last of the fat or lard was used up before Lent. No meat products should be eaten during Lent.

 

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Bread Pudding Snacks

December 19, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is Bread Pudding Snacks. Made using Reduced-Fat (2%) Milk, Egg Substitute, Sugar, Vanilla, Salt, Ground Nutmeg, Cinnamon-Raisin Bread, and Butter. Only 72 calories and 12 carbs per serving. You can find this recipe at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll also find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. I’ve left a link to subscribe to it at the end of the post. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Bread Pudding Snacks
These scrumptious treats deliver classic flavor without all the carbohydrate. This low-carb recipe is easy to prepare and yields 12 servings, making it a perfect dessert for a family get-together.

Ingredients
1 1/4 cups reduced-fat (2%) milk
1/2 cup cholesterol-free egg substitute
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional)
4 cups 1/2-inch cinnamon or cinnamon-raisin bread cubes (about 6 bread slices)
1 tablespoon margarine or butter, melted

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 12 medium-size muffin cups with paper baking cups.

2 – Combine milk, egg substitute, sugar, vanilla, salt, and nutmeg, if desired, in medium bowl; mix well. Add bread; mix until well moistened. Let stand at room temperature 15 minutes.

3 – Spoon bread mixture evenly into prepared cups; drizzle evenly with margarine.

4 – Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until snacks are puffed and golden brown. Remove to wire rack to cool completely.

Note: Snacks will puff up in the oven and fall slightly upon cooling.

Yield: 12 servings.

Serving size: 1 snack cup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 72 calories, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 2 mg, Sodium: 93 mg, Fiber: 0 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/bread-pudding-snacks/

 

 


Subscribe
Diabetes Self-Management offers up-to-date, practical “how-to” information on nutrition, exercise, new drugs, medical advances, self-help, and the many other topics people need to know about to stay healthy.
Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

the queen bee

sit + stay awhile

Cook Sleep Read

Saying "Yes, Please!" To a Delicious Life!

eatingwithgee

Healthy, Delicious Recipes On A Budget

Miles & Daydreams

a blog curated by your bff's.

experimentalspoon.wordpress.com/

Always Trying Something New to Cook to Entertain Family and Friends!

The Dads: Harris & Dave

Cooking, Decorating, Entertaining, Photography and More!

Pondering Pies

A Baking Blog

The Salty Honeybee

Food,Art,and Jokes

MY KETO GROWTH

Keto Diet Tips - Keto Recipes For Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snacks and Much More

The Yellow Pine Times

The Yellow Pine Times

Our City Homestead

Simple Country Living in the City

Cramp My Style

A Tale of Two Autoimmune Diseases

Crowded Kitchen

Mostly plant-based recipes that bring our family together despite multiple dietary differences.

Anne the Vegan

Chasing Wellness

Coll's Kitchen

Plant based foodie

polyphagicabby.wordpress.com/

Polyphagia: a strong sensation of hunger or desire to eat - often leading to overeating

Vegan Husband, Omnivore Wife

Recipes that make us both happy