Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 28, 2013 at 10:14 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Meat is expensive enough, but a big part of the cost is the price you’re paying the butcher to cut it up for you. Buy the largest cuts of meat you can, then cut it up, wrap it in foil, and put in a plastic bag in your freezer. Here are some more tips for butchering meat.

 

 

* Many stores will butcher big cuts of meat for you for free, so ask before doing it yourself!

 
* Use the sharpest knife you have, and never use a serrated knife, which will shred the meat.

 
* For illustrated instructions on how to cut any piece of meat, type the word “butchering” along with the type of meat into a search engine online. There are many tutorials (some including video) online.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 27, 2013 at 10:26 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Did you know that the best time to shop for meat is in the morning? That is usually when the butcher marks down meat that is close to its sell-by-date. If you won’t cook it tonight, freeze it for later

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 26, 2013 at 9:28 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Grocery stores make a lot of money on meat, so it’s not surprising that they display the priciest cuts in the case! Get dramatic savings by asking the butcher to slice different cuts for you from the same primal or section) of the cow or pig. These cuts can be as little as one – fifth of the cost of the expensive, pre-packaged cuts, and they’ll be just as tender and tasty. Here’s what to ask for.

 

 

* If you’re looking for rib eye steak, request chuck eye. You may need to ask the butcher to cut a 4 – inch roast off the front of the boneless chuck, then to peel out the chuck eye and cut it into steaks.

 

 

* Instead of pork tenderloin, buy an entire loin roast and ask the butcher to cut it up for you.

 

 

* When cross rib roasts are on sale (which is usually quite often), ask the butcher to carve a flatiron roast for you from the cross rib, and ask him to cut it into boneless ribs.

 

 

* Instead of buying ground beef, ask the butcher to grind up bottom round roast for you.

 

 

* If you like Italian sausages, try asking ground pork shoulder butt. It’s also a great substitute for ground beef.

Flat Iron Steak

November 4, 2013 at 10:56 AM | Posted in BEEF | Leave a comment
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Beef cut: Chuck Steak type: Flat iron steak (also known as: top blade roast, shoulder top blade roast, top boneless chuck, petite steak, butler steak, lifter steak, book steak, chuck clod, lifter roast, and triangle roast)

Beef cut: Chuck
Steak type: Flat iron steak
(also known as: top blade roast, shoulder top blade roast, top boneless chuck, petite steak,
butler steak, lifter steak, book steak, chuck clod, lifter roast, and triangle roast)

Flat iron steak is the American name for the cut known as butlers’ steak in the UK and oyster blade steak in Australia and New Zealand. It is cut with the grain, from the shoulder of the animal, producing a cut that tastes good, but is a bit tougher because it’s not cross-grain. This is used, in some places, as a means of selling a less expensive steak from a more expensive animal, for example kobe beef.

 

 
This cut of steak is from the shoulder of a beef animal. The steak encompasses the infraspinatus muscles of beef, and one may see this displayed in some butcher shops and meat markets as a “top blade” roast. Steaks that are cross cut from this muscle are called top blade steaks or patio steaks. As a whole cut of meat, it usually weighs around two to three pounds; it is located adjacent to the heart of the shoulder clod, under the seven or paddle bone (shoulder blade or scapula). The entire top blade usually yields four steaks between eight and 12 ounces each. Flat iron steaks usually have a significant amount of marbling. Anatomically, the muscle forms the dorsal part of the rotator cuff of the steer. This cut is anatomically distinct from the shoulder tender, which lies directly below it and is the teres major.
Restaurants, particularly upscale, have recently begun serving flat iron steaks on their menus. Especially popular are flat irons from Wagyu beef, as a way for chefs to offer more affordable and profitable dishes featuring Wagyū or Kobe beef. To make it more marketable, the steak, which has the fascia dividing the infraspinatus within it, has, in recent years, been cut as two flatter steaks, each corresponding to one muscle, with the tough fascia removed.
In the North American Meat Processor (NAMP) meat buyers guide, it is item #1114D Beef Shoulder, Top Blade Steak.

 

Raw flat iron steak

Raw flat iron steak

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