November 21, 2013 at 9:32 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 2 Comments
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Low Calorie Pasta Recipes? Still have your pasta and eat too, from the Eating Well web site. I left the link at the end of the post to get them all.

 

 

Low Calorie Pasta RecipesEating Well

 

You can eat pasta and still lose weight with these healthy pasta recipes.
Pasta is a favorite comfort food—it’s quick, easy to cook and always tastes good. But with all those carbs can it be healthy too? You bet! The trick is to keep portion sizes under control and add more lean protein and vegetables so you feel satisfied. And skip the “regular” white pasta, which is made from refined grains. Instead opt for whole-wheat pasta, which has more fiber—shown to help you lose weight. Say “yes” to pasta once again with these delicious low-calorie pasta recipes.

 

Chicken Piccata with Pasta & Mushrooms
Our chicken piccata, served over whole-wheat pasta, has a rich lemon-caper sauce that’s made with extra-virgin olive oil and just a touch of butter for flavor. If you like, you can use a mild fish like tilapia or even shrimp instead of chicken breast…..

 

 

Creamy Fettuccine with Brussels Sprouts & Mushrooms
Sliced Brussels sprouts and mushrooms cook quickly and cling to the pasta in our fall version of pasta primavera. Look for presliced mushrooms to cut prep time. Serve with a tossed salad….

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the recipes *

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_pasta_recipes?sssdmh=dm17.702462&utm_source=EWDNL&esrc=nwewd111113

Fall Harvest: Kohlrabi

October 8, 2013 at 10:52 AM | Posted in vegetables | Leave a comment
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Kohlrabi (late fall) comes into season by the end of fall, but stays at its sweet best into winter.

Kohlrabi stem with leaves

Kohlrabi stem with leaves

Kohlrabi (German turnip) (Brassica oleracea Gongylodes group) (Olkopi in Assamese and Bengali) is a perennial vegetable, and is a low, stout cultivar of cabbage. Kohlrabi can be eaten raw as well as cooked.

 

 

Kohlrabi has been created by artificial selection for lateral meristem growth (a swollen, nearly spherical shape); its origin in nature is the same as that of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, collard greens, and Brussels sprouts: they are all bred from, and are the same species as the wild cabbage plant (Brassica oleracea).
The taste and texture of kohlrabi are similar to those of a broccoli stem or cabbage heart, but milder and sweeter, with a higher ratio of flesh to skin. The young stem in particular can be as crisp and juicy as an apple, although much less sweet.

A basket of kohlrabi
Except for the Gigante cultivar, spring-grown kohlrabi much over 5 cm in size tend to be woody, as do full-grown kohlrabi much over perhaps 10 cm in size; the Gigante cultivar can achieve great size while remaining of good eating quality. The plant matures in 55–60 days after sowing. Approximate weight is 150 g and has good standing ability for up to 30 days after maturity.
There are several varieties commonly available, including White Vienna, Purple Vienna, Grand Duke, Gigante (also known as “Superschmelz”), Purple Danube, and White Danube. Coloration of the purple types is superficial: the edible parts are all pale yellow. The leafy greens can also be eaten.

 

 

A basket of kohlrabi

A basket of kohlrabi

Kohlrabi stems are surrounded by two distinct fibrous layers that do not soften appreciably when cooked. These layers are generally peeled away prior to cooking or serving raw, with the result that the stems often provide a smaller amount of food than one might assume from their intact appearance.
Kohlrabi leaves are edible and can be used interchangeably with collard and kale.
Kohlrabi is an important part of the Kashmiri diet and one of the most commonly cooked foods. It is prepared with its leaves and served with a light gravy and eaten with rice.
Some varieties are grown as feed for cattle.

 

 

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 9, 2013 at 10:50 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Brussels sprouts are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, and although they get a bad rap, our kids adore them. Store them in the Brussels Sproutsfridge to prevent their leaves from turning yellow. Cut an X on the stalk end of each sprout to ensure even and quick cooking.

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