Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Brussels Sprout, Turkey Sausage and Potato Hash

March 16, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Brussels Sprout, Turkey Sausage and Potato Hash. This week’s recipe combines JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Sausage, Brussels Sprouts, and Potatoes to make one delicious Hash! You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Brussels Sprout, Turkey Sausage and Potato Hash
Think hash is too hard? Think again. This recipe features Turkey Sausage, Brussels Sprouts and perfectly Crispy Potatoes. Full of flavor and your favorite veggies, this will soon become your most requested weekend dish. Bring on brunch!

INGREDIENTS
1 (1-pound) package JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Sausage
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pound Yukon gold potato, cubed
1 small onion, chopped
1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and thinly sliced
½ red bell pepper, chopped
½ cup chicken broth
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
chopped green onion, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) Cook turkey sausage as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
2) Add oil and potatoes and cook 5 minutes. Stir in onion and cook 5 minutes. Add sprouts, bell pepper, chicken broth, salt and pepper and cook 3 minutes or until bell pepper is tender. Garnish with chopped green onion, if desired.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 220
Protein 19g
Carbohydrates 21g
Fiber 4g
Sugars 3g
Fat 7g
Cholesterol 60mg
Sodium 930mg
Saturated Fat 1.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1127-brussel-sprout-turkey-sausage-and-potato-hash

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November 21, 2013 at 9:32 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 2 Comments
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Low Calorie Pasta Recipes? Still have your pasta and eat too, from the Eating Well web site. I left the link at the end of the post to get them all.

 

 

Low Calorie Pasta RecipesEating Well

 

You can eat pasta and still lose weight with these healthy pasta recipes.
Pasta is a favorite comfort food—it’s quick, easy to cook and always tastes good. But with all those carbs can it be healthy too? You bet! The trick is to keep portion sizes under control and add more lean protein and vegetables so you feel satisfied. And skip the “regular” white pasta, which is made from refined grains. Instead opt for whole-wheat pasta, which has more fiber—shown to help you lose weight. Say “yes” to pasta once again with these delicious low-calorie pasta recipes.

 

Chicken Piccata with Pasta & Mushrooms
Our chicken piccata, served over whole-wheat pasta, has a rich lemon-caper sauce that’s made with extra-virgin olive oil and just a touch of butter for flavor. If you like, you can use a mild fish like tilapia or even shrimp instead of chicken breast…..

 

 

Creamy Fettuccine with Brussels Sprouts & Mushrooms
Sliced Brussels sprouts and mushrooms cook quickly and cling to the pasta in our fall version of pasta primavera. Look for presliced mushrooms to cut prep time. Serve with a tossed salad….

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the recipes *

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_calorie_pasta_recipes?sssdmh=dm17.702462&utm_source=EWDNL&esrc=nwewd111113

Fall Harvest: Kohlrabi

October 8, 2013 at 10:52 AM | Posted in vegetables | Leave a comment
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Kohlrabi (late fall) comes into season by the end of fall, but stays at its sweet best into winter.

Kohlrabi stem with leaves

Kohlrabi stem with leaves

Kohlrabi (German turnip) (Brassica oleracea Gongylodes group) (Olkopi in Assamese and Bengali) is a perennial vegetable, and is a low, stout cultivar of cabbage. Kohlrabi can be eaten raw as well as cooked.

 

 

Kohlrabi has been created by artificial selection for lateral meristem growth (a swollen, nearly spherical shape); its origin in nature is the same as that of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, collard greens, and Brussels sprouts: they are all bred from, and are the same species as the wild cabbage plant (Brassica oleracea).
The taste and texture of kohlrabi are similar to those of a broccoli stem or cabbage heart, but milder and sweeter, with a higher ratio of flesh to skin. The young stem in particular can be as crisp and juicy as an apple, although much less sweet.

A basket of kohlrabi
Except for the Gigante cultivar, spring-grown kohlrabi much over 5 cm in size tend to be woody, as do full-grown kohlrabi much over perhaps 10 cm in size; the Gigante cultivar can achieve great size while remaining of good eating quality. The plant matures in 55–60 days after sowing. Approximate weight is 150 g and has good standing ability for up to 30 days after maturity.
There are several varieties commonly available, including White Vienna, Purple Vienna, Grand Duke, Gigante (also known as “Superschmelz”), Purple Danube, and White Danube. Coloration of the purple types is superficial: the edible parts are all pale yellow. The leafy greens can also be eaten.

 

 

A basket of kohlrabi

A basket of kohlrabi

Kohlrabi stems are surrounded by two distinct fibrous layers that do not soften appreciably when cooked. These layers are generally peeled away prior to cooking or serving raw, with the result that the stems often provide a smaller amount of food than one might assume from their intact appearance.
Kohlrabi leaves are edible and can be used interchangeably with collard and kale.
Kohlrabi is an important part of the Kashmiri diet and one of the most commonly cooked foods. It is prepared with its leaves and served with a light gravy and eaten with rice.
Some varieties are grown as feed for cattle.

 

 

 

18 Hearty Vegetarian Recipes for Fall

September 28, 2013 at 8:05 AM | Posted in Delish | 1 Comment
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Some fantastic recipes and tips for Vegetarian Recipes! All from the Delish we site, I left the link at the end of the post!

Delish

 

18 Hearty Vegetarian Recipes for Fall

Meaty stews and casseroles aren’t the only hearty meals for fall. These great vegetarian recipes are flavorful, filling, and a perfect complement for the cooler weather. From pasta and rice dishes to warm sandwiches and soups, there’s a dish for everyone to enjoy.
Sweet Potato-Peanut Bisque

This satisfying vegetarian soup is inspired by the flavors of West African peanut soup. We like the added zip of hot green chiles, but they can sometimes be very spicy. It’s best to add them slowly to taste.
Creamy Fettuccine with Brussels Sprouts and Mushrooms

Sliced Brussels sprouts and mushrooms cook quickly and cling to the pasta in our fall version of pasta primavera. Look for presliced mushrooms to cut prep time. Serve with a tossed salad.
* Click the link below to get all 18 Hearty Vegetarian Recipes for Fall *
http://www.delish.com/recipes/cooking-recipes/fall-vegetarian-recipes?src=nl&mag=del&list=nl_dhe_fot_non_092413_vegetarian-recipes#slide-1

Fall Harvest: Broccoli

September 24, 2013 at 7:40 AM | Posted in vegetables | 1 Comment
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Broccoli

 

Broccoli can be grown year-round in temperate climates so we’ve forgotten it even has a season. It is more sweet, less bitter and sharp when harvested in the cooler temperatures of fall in most climates.

 

Broccoli is an edible green plant in the cabbage family, whose large flower head is used as a vegetable. The word broccoli, from the Italian plural of broccolo, refers to “the flowering top of a cabbage”. Broccoli is usually boiled or steamed but may be eaten raw and has become popular as a raw vegetable in hors d’œuvre trays. The leaves may also be eaten.
Broccoli is classified in the Italica cultivar group of the species Brassica oleracea. Broccoli has large flower heads, usually green in color, arranged in a tree-like structure on branches sprouting from a thick, edible stalk. The mass of flower heads is surrounded by leaves. Broccoli most closely resembles cauliflower, which is a different cultivar group of the same species.
Broccoli is a result of careful breeding of cultivated leafy cole crops in the Northern Mediterranean in about the 6th century BC. Since the Roman Empire, broccoli has been considered a uniquely valuable food among Italians. Broccoli was brought to England from Antwerp in the mid-18th century by Peter Scheemakers. Broccoli was first introduced to the United States by Italian immigrants but did not become widely known there until the 1920s.

 
Broccoli is high in vitamin C and dietary fiber; it also contains multiple nutrients with potent anti-cancer properties, such as diindolylmethane and small amounts of selenium. A single serving provides more than 30 mg of vitamin C and a half-cup provides 52 mg of vitamin C. The 3,3′-Diindolylmethane found in broccoli is a potent modulator of the innate immune response system with anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity. Broccoli also contains the compound glucoraphanin, which can be processed into an anti-cancer compound sulforaphane, though the benefits of broccoli are greatly reduced if the vegetable is boiled. Broccoli is also an excellent source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical which boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells.
Boiling broccoli reduces the levels of suspected anti-carcinogenic compounds, such as sulforaphane, with losses of 20–30% after five minutes, 40–50% after ten minutes, and 77% after thirty minutes. However, other preparation methods such as steaming, microwaving, and stir frying had no significant effect on the compounds.
Broccoli has the highest levels of carotenoids in the brassica family. It is particularly rich in lutein and also provides a modest amount of beta-carotene.

 
There are three commonly grown types of broccoli. The most familiar is Calabrese broccoli, often referred to simply as “broccoli”, named after Calabria in Italy. It has large (10 to 20 cm) green heads and thick stalks. It is a cool season annual crop. Sprouting broccoli has a larger number of heads with many thin stalks. Purple cauliflower is a type of broccoli sold in southern Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. It has a head shaped like cauliflower, but consisting of tiny flower buds. It sometimes, but not always, has a purple cast to the tips of the flower buds.
Other cultivar groups of Brassica oleracea include cabbage (Capitata Group), cauliflower and Romanesco broccoli (Botrytis Group), kale and collard greens (Acephala Group), kohlrabi (Gongylodes Group), and Brussels sprouts (Gemmifera Group). Chinese broccoli (Alboglabra Group) is also a cultivar group of Brassica oleracea. Rapini, sometimes called “broccoli rabe” among other names, forms similar but smaller heads, and is actually a type of turnip (Brassica rapa). Broccolini or “Tender Stem Broccoli” is a cross between broccoli and Chinese broccoli.

 

Indian summer

October 5, 2012 at 10:13 AM | Posted in cooking, Food, vegetables | 2 Comments
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It’s been beautiful here in the Ohio Valley. Sunny warm days and cool nights. Some say it’s Indian Summer. So here’s a little on Indian Summer and our Fall Harvests.

 

An Indian summer is a heat wave that occurs in the autumn. It refers to a period of considerably above normal temperatures,

A typical day within a period of “Indian Summer”

accompanied by dry and hazy conditions, usually after there has been a killing frost. Depending on latitude and elevation, it can occur in the Northern Hemisphere between late September and mid November.

 

An Indian summer is a period of unseasonably warm, dry weather, occurring after the end of summer proper. The US National Weather Service defines this as where the weather is sunny and clear, and above 21 °C (70 °F), after there has been a sharp frost; a period normally associated with late-October to mid-November.
In some regions of the southwestern United States, ‘Indian summer’ is colloquially used to describe the hottest times of the year, typically in late July or August. But in the South, as elsewhere in the US, this period is more commonly known as the dog days, in reference to the position of Sirius, the ‘Dog Star’ and brightest star in the sky (other than the Sun and the planets). In the desert southwestern United States, where frost is rare, the term is sometimes used to refer to a brief period of hot dry weather which occurs after the hottest months and before the onset of winter cool and/or rain, typically in October or November. It may also be used to refer to any unseasonably warm weather during the first few weeks of the rainy season, before the approach of spring. In the Pacific Northwest, the term can be used to describe a period of warm, dry weather after the first fall rains have occurred. A famous use of the phrase in American literature is Van Wyck BrooksNew England: Indian Summer, a sequel to his Pulitzer Prize-winning The Flowering of New England.
In the United Kingdom an Indian summer is often used to describe warm weather that comes later in the year, after unusually cool summer months.

 

Good Crops for Fall Harvests

Many of the veggies that are harvested in fall—the ones you’re beginning to see in farmers markets now—actually need to be planted in mid- to late-summer. See SparkPeople‘s excellent resource on vegetable gardening for info on when and how to plant these crops.

Crucifers
Broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower—those staples of the fall dinner table— thrive in autumn weather, and their flavors benefit from colder temps. They can be planted in fall in more southern zones, but need to be started from seed indoors. Plan now for next summer; start seedlings in midsummer and plant in late summer for a fall harvest.

Squashes
Acorn, butternut, pumpkin and other winter squash varieties are not only delicious, but they’re traditional in fall and holiday decor.

Yellow squash

These, too, must be planted in summer for a fall harvest, as they take up to 100 days to maturity and like lots of sun. And they take up significant growing space, often sending out long vines that need room to move. Plan now for next summer.

Dark Greens
Leafy, hearty, nutrient-packed greens like kale and chard are also commonly found at farmers’ markets in the fall; they, too, need time to reach maturity (about two to two and a half months). While they can tolerate cool fall weather, they require full sun and should be planted in late summer to reach full production.

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