One of America’s Favorites – Poached Egg

May 6, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A poached egg in a Salad Niçoise

A poached egg is an egg that has been cooked, outside the shell, by poaching (or sometimes steaming), as opposed to simmering or boiling liquid.

This method of preparation is favored for eggs, as it can yield more delicately cooked eggs than cooking at higher temperatures such as with boiling water.

The egg is cracked into a cup or bowl of any size, and then gently slid into a pan of water at approximately 75 Celsius (167 °F) and cooked until the egg white has mostly solidified, but the yolk remains soft. The “perfect” poached egg has a runny yolk, with a hardening crust and no raw white remaining.

Broken into water at the poaching temperature, the white will cling to the yolk, resulting in cooked egg white and runny yolk.

Any given chicken egg contains some egg white that is prone to dispersing into the poaching liquid and cooking into an undesirable foam. To prevent this, the egg can be strained beforehand to remove the thinner component of the egg white. A small amount of vinegar may also be added to the water, as its acidic qualities accelerate the poaching process. Stirring the water vigorously to create a vortex may also reduce dispersion.

A single broken poached egg on 2 pieces of toast

The term “poaching” is used for this method but is actually incorrect. The egg is placed in a cup and suspended over simmering water, using a special pan called an “egg-poacher”. This is usually a wide-bottomed pan with an inner lid, with holes containing a number of circular cups that each hold one egg, with an additional lid over the top. To cook, the pan is filled with water and brought to a simmer, or a gentle boil. The outer lid holds in the steam, ensuring that the heat surrounds the egg completely. The cups are often lubricated with butter in order to effect easy removal of the cooked egg, although non-stick egg poachers are also available.

The result is very similar to the traditional coddled egg, although these steamed eggs are often cooked for longer, and hence are firmer. Eggs so prepared are often served on buttered toast.

Poached eggs are used in the traditional American breakfast/brunch dish Eggs Benedict.

Poached eggs are the basis for many dishes in Louisiana Creole cuisine, such as Eggs Sardou, Eggs Portuguese, Eggs Hussarde and Eggs St. Charles. Creole poached egg dishes are typically served for brunches.

Eggs Benedict, a dish often served for breakfast or brunch.

Several cuisines include eggs poached in soup or broth and served in the soup. In parts of central Colombia, for instance, a popular breakfast item is eggs poached in a scallion/coriander broth with milk, known as changua or simply caldo de huevo (“egg soup”).

The North African dish shakshouka consists of eggs poached in a spicy tomato sauce.

In Italy poached eggs are typically seasoned with grated parmigiano reggiano and butter (or olive oil).

In Korean cuisine, poached eggs are known as suran (수란) and is topped with variety of garnishes such as chili threads, rock tripe threads, and scallion threads.

Turkish dish çılbır consists of poached eggs, yogurt sauce with garlic and butter with red peppers.

In India, fried eggs are most commonly called “poached,” but are sometimes also known as bullseyes, as a reference to “bullseye” targets, or “half-boil” in Southern India, indicating that they are partly cooked. These eggs are “poached” in name only and so do not share the same preparation method as poached eggs in other countries.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Hangtown Fry

August 13, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A “hangtown burger” made using a hangtown fry, a ⅓-pound chuck steak, sriracha sauce of roasted red peppers, and baby arugula

Hangtown fry is a type of omelette made famous during the California Gold Rush in the 1850s. The most common version includes bacon and oysters combined with eggs, and fried together. The dish was invented in Placerville, California, then known as Hangtown. According to most accounts, the dish was invented when a gold prospector struck it rich, headed to the Cary House Hotel, and demanded the most expensive dish that the kitchen could provide. The most expensive ingredients available were eggs, which were delicate and had to be carefully brought to the mining town; bacon, which was shipped from the East Coast, and oysters, which had to be brought on ice from San Francisco, over 100 miles away.

Another creation myth is the one told by the waiters at Sam’s Grill in Tiburon, just north of San Francisco. At the county jail in Placerville, a condemned man was asked what he would like to eat for his last meal. He thought quickly and ordered an oyster omelet, knowing that the oysters would have to be brought from the water, over a hundred miles away by steamship and over rough roads, delaying his execution for a day.

The dish was popularized by Tadich Grill in San Francisco, where it has apparently been on the menu for 160 years. Later variations on the dish include the addition of onions, bell peppers, or various spices, and deep frying the oysters before adding them to the omelette.

According to the El Dorado County Museum, “No dish epitomizes California and its Gold Rush more than Hangtown Fry. It was created at a location central to the Gold Rush at the same time the great state was being born. And, like the miners who worked the river banks and hillsides, and the population that followed, it is a unique blend of many things, both those produced locally and those that have arrived from elsewhere.”

 

Healthy Omelet Recipes

July 25, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 7 Comments
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Omelet Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Omelet Recipes like; Easy Loaded Baked Omelet Muffins, Denver Omelet Sandwiches, and Vegetable-Filled Omelets. Find these recipes and much more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Omelet Recipes
Find healthy, delicious omelet recipes, from EatingWell, including cheese, egg white and spinach omelets.

Easy Loaded Baked Omelet Muffins
Protein-packed omelet muffins, or baked mini omelets, are a perfect breakfast for busy mornings. Make a batch ahead and freeze for the days when you don’t have time for your typical bowl of oatmeal. You can also serve these fresh with fruit salad for a simple weekend brunch………………..

Denver Omelet Sandwiches
This egg sandwich recipe with flavorful Canadian bacon and crunchy bell pepper is a perfect healthy breakfast-for-dinner candidate. For an evening meal, serve with roasted potatoes and a tomato salad. For breakfast, just add a cup of coffee or tea and you’re good to go…….

Vegetable-Filled Omelets
Enjoy this vegetable omelet for breakfast or dinner. Pair it with potatoes or slice of toast for a complete meal………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Omelet Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21525/mealtimes/breakfast-brunch/eggs/omelets/

Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes WEDNESDAY

April 18, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its – Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes. Delicious and Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes like; Knife-and-Fork Breakfast Burrito, Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes, and Egg and Potato Casserole. Find these recipes and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes
Whether you crave a homemade muffin, a brunch dish for company, or crisp hash browns, you’ll find it in this collection of diabetic breakfast favorites, most with carb counts of 20 grams or less per serving.

Knife-and-Fork Breakfast Burrito
If you’re in the mood for Mexican, give this low-carb recipe a try. The eggs are cooked in a thin layer and become the shell, replacing regular, carb-laden tortillas. Healthy black beans provide 4 grams of fiber……….

Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes
The serving size is two delicious pancakes for 22 grams of carb. The soluble fiber in buckwheat is digested slowly, helping to prevent blood sugar spikes………..

Egg and Potato Casserole
This company-worthy casserole makes our low-carb cut with 22 grams per serving. By using Canadian-style bacon and lower-fat dairy products, calories stay in check, too……..

* Click the link below to get all the Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/breakfast/low-carb-breakfast-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Belgian Waffles

April 16, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A Belgian waffle with strawberries and confectioner’s sugar

In North America, Belgian waffles are a variety of waffle with a lighter batter, larger squares, and deeper pockets than ordinary American waffles. Belgian waffles were originally leavened with yeast, but baking powder is now often used.

In Belgium itself, there are several kinds of waffle, including the Brussels waffle and the Liège waffle.

In North America, they are often eaten as a breakfast food; toppings vary from whipped cream, confectioners sugar, soft fruit, and chocolate spread, to syrup and butter or margarine. They may also be served with vanilla ice cream and fresh fruit (such as strawberries) as a dessert.

Originally showcased in 1958 at Expo 58 in Brussels, Belgian waffles were introduced to North America by a Belgian named Walter Cleyman at the Century 21 Exposition in Seattle in 1962, and served with whipped cream and strawberries. The waffles were further popularized in the United States during the 1964 New York World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows Park. The waffle was introduced by Maurice Vermersch of Brussels, Belgium, and was named the Bel-Gem Waffle. Largely based on a simplified recipe for the Brussels waffles, Vermersch decided to change the name upon observing that many Americans could not correctly identify Brussels as the capital of Belgium. These waffles were served with whipped cream and strawberries, and retailed for a dollar.

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week – CHEESY SCALLION OMELET

April 15, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | 2 Comments
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a CHEESY SCALLION OMELET. Got the perfect recipe for Breakfast or Brunch, CHEESY SCALLION OMELET. Made using fat-free liquid egg substitute along with scallions, and Smooth Sensations Cream Cheese Spread Classic Cream 1/3 Less Fat. Only 150 calories and 5 carbs per serving! You can find this recipe along with all the other Diabetic Friendly Recipes at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. So enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

CHEESY SCALLION OMELET

CHEESY SCALLION OMELET

Ingredients

3/4 cup fat-free liquid egg substitute
1/4 cup finely chopped scallions
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1 wedge Smooth Sensations Cream Cheese Spread Classic Cream 1/3 Less Fat

Directions

Mix egg substitute, scallions & seasonings in a medium bowl.
Bring a skillet sprayed with nonstick spray to medium heat. Add mixture, cover & cook 3 minutes or until set.
Transfer to plate, spread wedge over half and fold over. Super simple & delicious!

Recipe Yield: Yield: 1 serving

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 150
Fat: 4 grams
Sodium: 500 milligrams
Protein: 21 grams
Carbohydrates: 5 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/cheesy-scallion-omelet

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 8, 2017 at 5:22 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Scrambled Eggs………

 
Always scramble your eggs on low heat. It might take longer for them to cook, but it reduces the risk of browning and overcooking. It also gives you more control over the consistency.

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Green Chile and Cheese Strata

February 27, 2017 at 6:14 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a Green Chile and Cheese Strata. Put a fresh and Meatless twist on your Stratas with this week’s recipe. It’s from the CooksRecipes website which has an endless selection of recipes to please any taste or diet. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

 

Green Chile and Cheese Strata

This South-of-the-Border strata will be a welcome change from other versions you may be familiar with.

Recipe Ingredients:Cooksrecipes 2

6 slices thick white bread
6 thick slices Monterey Jack cheese
1 (4-ounce) can ORTEGA Diced Green Chiles
2 cups milk
4 large eggs, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons chopped green onions
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
1 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Cooking Directions:

1 – Preheat oven to 325°F (160°C). Grease a 13x9x2-inch baking dish.
2 – Place bread in bottom of prepared baking dish; top with Monterey Jack cheese. Sprinkle with chiles.
3 – Combine milk, eggs, green onion, hot pepper sauce and salt in small bowl. Pour over bread and cheese; sprinkle with cheddar cheese.
4 – Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until knife inserted in center comes out clean and top is golden brown.
Makes 6 servings.
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/green_chile_and_cheese_strata_recipe.html

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Eggs Benedict with Bison Bresaola

February 15, 2017 at 6:31 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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For this week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week, Eggs Benedict with Bison Bresaola. Made with Wild Idea Bison Bresaola, which is 100% grass-fed bison meat, and cure with sea salt and a blend of traditional style Bresaola herbs. Another good one from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo. http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 
Eggs Benedict with Bison Bresaola
By: Jill O’Brien
Say goodbye to the questionable Canadian Bacon and hello to Wild Idea’s Bison Bresaola! Our Bresaola is brine cured, aged and then slowly smoked for a moister version of this Italian favorite. The subtle tang of the cured meat pairs very well with farm fresh eggs and the buttery, lemony Hollandaise sauce! You’re going to love this rendition!

 
Ingredients:Eggs Benedict with Bison Bresaola
1 – 8 ounce pkg. Wild Idea Bison Bresaola
2 to 4 – English Muffins, split
butter
4 to 8 – farm fresh or organic eggs
2 – teaspoons olive oil
1 – quart boiling water
salt & pepper
Hollandaise Sauce – recipe below

 

Preparation:
1) Allow Wild Idea Bison Bresaola to rest at room temperature for an hour or two. This will make separating the slices easier. Separate into 4 to 8 piles of meat.
2) In a medium size non stick pan or on griddle, over low heat, heat the piles of Bresaola. About one minute each side. Remove from heat.
3) Toast English muffins in toaster or on griddle until slightly golden. Spread hot muffins with desired amount of butter.
4) To poach multiple eggs, pre-crack eggs into individual ramekins.
5) Heat a large non-stick pan over medium heat, and add oil spreading it around. Add eggs one at a time quickly, this helps them set individually. *This method is in-between poached and basted eggs, but it works great!
6) Immediately add the boiling water and cover. Reduce heat to low, and check after one minute. Cover and cook for another minute. Eggs are done when the top of the egg white is sealed and white in color. Continue if needed or until desired doneness is established. Remove poached eggs from pan with a slotted spoon.
7) Place buttered muffins on plates, top with warmed Bresaola, and poached eggs. Season the eggs with a little salt and pepper, and drizzle hollandaise over the eggs as desired. Sprinkle with a pinch of cayenne or paprika.

 

 

Hollandaise SauceWild Idea
*I like my hollandaise a little on the lemony side. If you prefer less, substitute a little water for thinning if needed. If needing to reheat, place sauce in a container and place in a pan of boiling water. Stir to avoid over cooking.

Ingredients:
3 – egg yolks
3 – tablespoons lemon juice
1 – teaspoon black pepper
¼ – teaspoon cayenne pepper, more if desired
1 – stick salted organic butter, melted and still hot

Preparation:
1) Place egg yolks, one tablespoons lemon juice, pepper, and cayenne in a blender and blend until slightly thick.
2) Add melted hot butter through top while blender is still running. Blend to incorporate. Stop until ready to serve.
3) When ready to serve, flash blend again, adding the last tablespoon of lemon juice. Season to taste.
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2015/eggs-benedict-with-bison-bresaola/

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo 8 oz. Bresaola
We start with our 100% grass-fed bison meat, and cure with sea salt and a blend of traditional style Bresaola herbs. BresaolaTo maximize flavor we dry age for five weeks. It is then air-dried and slowly smoked, creating a moist version of this Italian classic. This new Wild Idea premium buffalo product will soon become a favorite. Delicious by itself, or use in salads, sandwiches, benedicts or anti pasto. Mangiare Bene!

8 oz. package

Ingredients: Grass-Fed Buffalo meat, Sea Salt, Pure Cane Sugar. Organic:Juniper Berry, Black Pepper, Sage, Rosemary, Marjoram, Cultured Celery Powder, Cardamom.

http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/products/bresaola

One of America’s Favorites – Eggs Benedict

November 21, 2016 at 6:18 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Eggs Benedict

Eggs Benedict

Eggs Benedict is a traditional American brunch or breakfast dish that consists of two halves of an English muffin each of which is topped with Canadian bacon – or sometimes bacon – a poached egg, and hollandaise sauce. The dish was first popularized in New York City. Many variations on the basic recipe are served.

 

 

 

 

Eggs Benedict with smoked salmon

Eggs Benedict with smoked salmon

There are conflicting accounts as to the origin of Eggs Benedict.

In an interview recorded in the “Talk of the Town” column of The New Yorker in 1942, the year before his death, Lemuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street stock broker, claimed that he had wandered into the Waldorf Hotel in 1894 and, hoping to find a cure for his morning hangover, ordered “buttered toast, poached eggs, crisp bacon, and a hooker of hollandaise”. Oscar Tschirky, the famed maître d’hôtel, was so impressed with the dish that he put it on the breakfast and luncheon menus but substituted ham for the bacon and a toasted English muffin for the toast.

Another claim to the creation of Eggs Benedict was circuitously made by Edward P. Montgomery on behalf of Commodore E. C. Benedict. In 1967 Montgomery wrote a letter to then The New York Times food columnist Craig Claiborne which included a recipe he claimed to have received through his uncle, a friend of the commodore. Commodore Benedict’s recipe — by way of Montgomery — varies greatly from chef Ranhofer’s version, particularly in the hollandaise sauce preparation — calling for the addition of “hot, hard-cooked egg and ham mixture”.

Delmonico’s in lower Manhattan claims on its menu that “Eggs Benedict was first created in our ovens in 1860.”

 
Several variations of Eggs Benedict exist.

Eggs Benedict with bacon on toast

Eggs Benedict with bacon on toast

* Eggs Blackstone substitutes streaky bacon for the ham and adds a tomato slice.
* Eggs Blanchard substitutes Béchamel sauce for Hollandaise .
* Eggs Florentine substitutes spinach for the ham or adds it underneath. Older versions of eggs Florentine add spinach to poached or shirred eggs.
* Eggs Mornay substitutes Mornay (cheese) sauce for the Hollandaise.
* Eggs Atlantic, Eggs Hemingway, or Eggs Copenhagen (also known as Eggs Royale and Eggs Montreal in New Zealand) substitutes salmon or smoked salmon for the ham. This is a common variation found in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom. This is also known as “Eggs Benjamin” in some restaurants in Canada.
* Huevos Benedictos substitutes sliced avocado and/or Mexican chorizo for the ham, and is topped with both a salsa (such as salsa roja or salsa brava) and hollandaise sauce.
* Eggs Hussarde substitutes Holland rusks for the English muffin and adds Bordelaise sauce.
* Irish Benedict replaces the ham with corned beef or Irish bacon.
* Dutch Benedict replaces the ham or bacon with scrapple. Popular in the eastern region of Pennsylvania.
* Eggs Hebridean replaces the ham with black pudding, often from Stornoway.
* Eggs Cochon, a variation from New Orleans restaurants which replaces the ham with pork “debris” (slow roasted pork shredded in its own juices) and the English muffin with a large buttermilk biscuit.

 

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