Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 23, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When making Brownies……………………….

Don’t bake 2 sheets of brownies at the same time, brownies must be baked in the middle of the oven to cook through and brown evenly. Enjoy!

One of America’s Favorites – Quick Bread

April 20, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Banana bread is a type of quick bread

Quick bread is any bread leavened with leavening agents other than yeast or eggs. An advantage of quick breads is their ability to be prepared quickly and reliably, without requiring the time-consuming skilled labor and the climate control needed for traditional yeast breads.

Quick breads include many cakes, brownies and cookies—as well as banana bread, beer bread, biscuits, cornbread, muffins, pancakes, scones, and soda bread.

“Quick bread” most probably originated in the United States at the end of the eighteenth century. Before the creation of quick bread, baked goods were leavened either with yeast or by mixing dough with eggs. “Fast bread” is an alternate name.

The discovery or rediscovery of chemical leavening agents and their widespread military, commercial, and home use in the United States dates back to 1846 with the introduction of commercial baking soda in New York, by Church and Dwight of “Arm & Hammer” fame. This development was extended in 1856 by the introduction of commercial baking powder in Massachusetts, although perhaps the best known form of baking powder is “Calumet”, first introduced in Hammond, Indiana and West Hammond, Illinois (later Calumet City, Illinois) in 1889. Both forms of food-grade chemical leaveners are still being produced under their original names, although not within the same corporate structure.

During the American Civil War (1861–1865), the demand for portable and quickly-made food was high, while skilled labor for traditional breadmaking was scarce. This encouraged the adoption of bread which was rapidly made and leavened with baking soda, instead of yeast. The shortage of chemical leaveners in the American South during the Civil War contributed to a food crisis there.

As the Industrial Revolution accelerated, the marketing of mass-produced prepackaged foods was eased by the use of chemical leaveners, which could produce consistent products regardless of variations in source ingredients, time of year, geographical location, weather conditions, and many other factors that could cause problems with environmentally sensitive, temperamental yeast formulations. These factors were traded off against the loss of traditional yeast flavor, nutrition, and texture.

Preparing a quick bread generally involves two mixing containers. One contains all dry ingredients (including chemical leavening agents or agent) and one contains all wet ingredients (possibly including liquid ingredients that are slightly acidic in order to initiate the leavening process). In some variations, the dry ingredients are in a bowl and the wet ingredients are heated sauces in a saucepan off-heat and cooled.

During the chemical leavening process, agents (one or more food-grade chemicals—usually a weak acid and a weak base) are added into the dough during mixing. These agents undergo a chemical reaction to produce carbon dioxide, which increases the baked good’s volume and produces a porous structure and lighter texture. Yeast breads often take hours to rise, and the resulting baked good’s texture can vary greatly based on external factors such as temperature and humidity. By contrast, breads made with chemical leavening agents are relatively uniform, reliable, and quick. Usually, the resulting baked good is softer and lighter than a traditional yeast bread.

Chemical leavening agents include a weak base, such as baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) plus a weak acid, such as cream of tartar, lemon juice, or cultured buttermilk, to create an acid–base reaction that releases carbon dioxide. (Quick bread leavened specifically with baking soda is often called “soda bread”.) Baking powder contains both an acid and a base in dry powdered form, and simply needs a liquid medium in which to react. Other alternative leavening agents are egg whites mechanically beaten to form stiff peaks, as in the case of many waffle recipes, or steam, in the case of cream puffs. Nevertheless, in a commercial process, designated chemical leavening acids and bases are used to make gas production consistent and controlled. Almost all quick breads have the same basic ingredients: flour, leavening, eggs, fat (butter, margarine, shortening, or oil), and liquid such as milk. Ingredients beyond these basic constituents are added for variations in flavor and texture. The type of bread produced varies based predominantly on the method of mixing, the major flavoring, and the ratio of liquid in the batter. Some batters are thin enough to pour, and others thick enough to mold into lumps.

There are three basic methods for making quick breads, which may combine the “rise” of the chemical leavener with advantageous “lift” from other ingredients:

* The stirring method (also known as the quick-bread method, blending method, or muffin method) is used for pancakes, muffins, corn bread, dumplings, and fritters. It calls for measurement of dry and wet ingredients separately, then quickly mixing the two. Often the wet ingredients include beaten eggs, which have trapped air that helps the product to rise. In these recipes, the fats are liquid, such as cooking oil. Usually mixing is done using a tool with a wide head such as a spoon or spatula to prevent the dough from becoming over-beaten, which would break down the egg’s lift.
* The creaming method is frequently used for cake batters. The butter and sugar are “creamed”, or beaten together until smooth and fluffy. Eggs and liquid flavoring are mixed in, and finally dry and liquid ingredients are added in. The creaming method combines rise gained from air bubbles in the creamed butter with the rise from the chemical leaveners. Gentle folding in of the final ingredients avoids destroying these air pockets.
* The shortening method, also known as the biscuit method, is used for biscuits and sometimes scones. This method cuts solid fat (whether lard, butter, or vegetable shortening) into flour and other dry ingredients using a food processor, pastry blender, or two hand-held forks. The layering from this process gives rise and adds flakiness as the folds of fat melt during baking. This technique is said to produce “shortened” cakes and breads, regardless of whether or not the chosen fat is vegetable shortening.

Quick breads also vary widely in the consistency of their dough or batter. There are four main types of quick bread batter:

Pancake batter is made using the stirring method

* Pour batters, such as pancake batter, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:1 and so pours in a steady stream. Also called a “low-ratio” baked good.
* Drop batters, such as cornbread and muffin batters, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:2.
* Soft doughs, such as many chocolate chip cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:3. Soft doughs stick significantly to work surfaces.
* Stiff doughs, such as pie crust and sugar cookie doughs, have a liquid to dry ratio of about 1:8. Stiff doughs are easy to work in that they only minimally stick to work surfaces, including tools and hands. Also called “high-ratio” baked good.
The above are volumetric ratios and are not based on baker’s percentages or weights.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Peanut Butter

February 3, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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“Smooth” peanut butter in a jar

Peanut butter is a food paste or spread made from ground, dry-roasted peanuts. It often contains additional ingredients that modify the taste or texture, such as salt, sweeteners, or emulsifiers. Peanut butter is popular in many countries. The United States is a leading exporter of peanut butter and itself consumes $800 million of peanut butter annually.

Peanut butter is served as a spread on bread, toast, or crackers, and used to make sandwiches (notably the peanut butter and jelly sandwich). It is also used in a number of breakfast dishes and desserts, such as peanut-flavored granola, smoothies, crepes, cookies, brownies, or croissants. It is similar to other nut butters such as cashew butter and almond butter.

The two main types of peanut butter are crunchy (or chunky) and smooth (or creamy). In crunchy peanut butter, some coarsely-ground peanut fragments are included to give extra texture. The peanuts in smooth peanut butter are ground uniformly, creating a creamy texture.

In the US, food regulations require that any product labelled “peanut butter” must contain at least 90% peanuts; the remaining <10% usually consists of “…salt, a sweetener, and an emulsifier or hardened vegetable oil which prevents the peanut oil from separating”. In the US, no product labelled as “peanut butter” can contain “artificial sweeteners, chemical preservatives, natural or artificial coloring additives.” Some brands of peanut butter are sold without emulsifiers that bind the peanut oils with the peanut paste, and so require stirring after separation. Most major brands of peanut butter add white sugar, but there are others that use dried cane syrup, agave syrup, or coconut palm sugar.

Organic and artisanal peanut butters are available, but their markets are small.

A tractor being used to complete the first stage of the peanut harvesting process

Production process
Planting and harvesting
Due to weather conditions, peanuts are usually planted in spring. The peanut comes from a yellow flower which bends over and infiltrates the soil after blooming and wilting, and the peanut starts to grow in the soil. Peanuts are harvested from late August to October, while the weather is clear. This weather allows for dry soil so that when picked, the soil does not stick to the stems and pods. The peanuts are then removed from vines and transported to a peanut shelling machine for mechanical drying. After cropping, the peanuts are delivered to warehouses for cleaning, where they are stored unshelled in silos.

Shelling
Shelling must be conducted carefully lest the seeds be damaged during the removal of the shell. The moisture of the unshelled peanuts is controlled to avoid excessive frangibility of the shells and kernels, which in turn, reduces the amount of dust present in the plant. After, the peanuts are sent to a series of rollers set specifically for the batch of peanuts, where they are cracked. After cracking, the peanuts go through a screening process where they are inspected for contaminants.

Roasting
The dry roasting process employs either the batch or continuous method. In the batch method, peanuts are heated in large quantities in a revolving oven at about 800 °F (427 °C). Next, the peanuts in each batch are uniformly held and roasted in the oven at 320 °F (160 °C) for about 40 to 60 minutes. This method is good to use when the peanuts differ in moisture content. In the continuous method, a hot air roaster is employed. The peanuts pass through the roaster whilst being rocked to permit even roasting. A photometer indicates the completion of dry roasting. This method is favored by large manufacturers since it can lower the rate of spoilage and requires less labor.

Cooling
After dry roasting, peanuts are removed from the oven as quickly as possible and directly placed in a blower-cooler cylinder. There are suction fans in the metal cylinder that can pull a large volume of air through, so the peanuts can be cooled more efficiently. The peanuts will not be dried out because cooling can help retain some oil and moisture. The cooling process is completed when the temperature in the cylinder reaches 86 °F (30 °C).

Blanching
After the kernels have been cooled down, the peanuts will undergo either heat blanching or water blanching to remove the remaining seed coats. Compared to heat blanching, water blanching is a new process. Water blanching first appeared in 1949.

Heat blanching
Peanuts are heated by hot air at 280 °F (138 °C) for not more than 20 minutes in order to soften and split the skins. After that, the peanuts are exposed to continuous steam in a blanching machine. The skins are then removed using either bristles or soft rubber belts. After that, these skins are separated and blown into waste bags. Meanwhile, the hearts of peanuts are segregated through inspection.

Water blanching
After the kernels are arranged in troughs, the skin of the kernel is cracked on opposite sides by rolling it through sharp stationary blades. While the skins are removed, the kernels are brought through a one-minute hot water bath and placed on a swinging pad with canvas on top. The swinging action of the pad rubs off the skins. Afterward, the blanched kernels are dried for at least six hours by hot air at 120 °F (49 °C).

After blanching, the peanuts are screened and inspected to eliminate the burnt and rotten peanuts. A blower is also used to remove light peanuts and discolored peanuts are removed using a color sorting machine.

Grinding
After blanching the peanuts are sent to grinding to be manufactured into peanut butter. The peanuts are then sent through two sizes of grinders. The first grinder produces a medium grind, and the second produces a fine grind. At this point, salt, sugar and a vegetable oil stabilizer are added to the fine grind to produce the peanut butter. This adds flavor and allows the peanut butter to stay as a homogenous mixture. Chopped peanuts may also be added at this stage to produce “chunky” peanut butter.

Packaging

A jar of commercial “creamy” peanut butter

Before packaging, the peanut butter must first be cooled in order to be sealed in jars. The mixture is pumped into a heat exchanger in order to cool it to about 120 °F (49 °C). Once cool, the peanut butter is pumped into jars and vacuum sealed. This vacuum sealing rids the container of oxygen so that oxidation cannot occur, preserving the food. The jars are then labelled and set aside until crystallization occurs. The peanut butter is then packaged into cartons distributed to retailers, where they are stored at room temperature and sold to consumers.

A 2012 article stated that “China and India are the first and second largest producers, respectively”, of peanuts. The United States of America “…is the third largest producer of peanuts (Georgia and Texas are the two major peanut-producing states)” and “more than half of the American peanut crop goes into making peanut butter.”

Nutritional profile
In a 100 gram amount, smooth peanut butter supplies 588 Calories and is composed of 50% fat, 25% protein, 20% carbohydrates (including 6% dietary fiber), and 2% water (table).

Peanut butter is a rich source (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of dietary fiber, vitamin E, pantothenic acid, niacin, and vitamin B6 (table, USDA National Nutrient Database). Also high in content are the dietary minerals manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, and copper (table). Peanut butter is a moderate source (10–19% DV) of thiamin, iron, and potassium (table).

Both crunchy/chunky and smooth peanut butter are sources of saturated (primarily palmitic acid, 21% of total fat) and monounsaturated fats, mainly oleic acid as 47% of total fat, and polyunsaturated fat (28% of total fat), primarily as linoleic acid).

Peanut allergy
For people with a peanut allergy, peanut butter can cause a variety of possible allergic reactions, including life-threatening anaphylaxis. This potential effect has led to banning peanut butter, among other common foods, in some schools.

Symptoms
* Shortness of breath
* Wheezing
* Tightening of the throat
* Itching
* Skin reactions such as hives and swelling
* Digestive problems

Peanut butter cookies, a popular type of cookie made from peanut butter and other ingredients

As an ingredient
Peanut butter is included as an ingredient in many recipes: peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, peanut butter cookies, and candies where peanut is the main flavor, such as Reese’s Pieces, or various peanut butter and chocolate treats, such as Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and the Crispy Crunch candy bar.

Peanut butter’s flavor combines well with other flavors, such as oatmeal, cheese, cured meats, savory sauces, and various types of breads and crackers. The creamy or crunchy, fatty, salty taste pairs very well with complementary soft and sweet ingredients like fruit preserves, bananas, apples, and honey. The taste can also be enhanced by similarly salty things like bacon (see peanut butter, banana and bacon sandwich), especially if the peanut butter has added sweetness.

One snack for children is called “Ants on a Log”, with a celery stick acting as the “log”. The groove in the celery stick is filled with peanut butter and raisins arranged in a row along the top are “ants”.

Plumpy’nut is a peanut butter-based food used to fight malnutrition in famine-stricken countries. A single pack contains 500 calories, can be stored unrefrigerated for 2 years, and requires no cooking or preparation.

As animal food
Peanut butter inside a hollow chew toy is a method to occupy a dog with a favored treat. A common outdoor bird feeder is a coating of peanut butter on a pine cone with an overlying layer of birdseed.

Healthy Cookie and Dessert Recipes

December 12, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cookie and Dessert Recipes. Just in time for Christmas its Healthy Cookie and Dessert Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Cookie and Dessert Recipes with recipes like Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies, Gluten-Free Fudgy Teff Brownies, and Gluten-Free Gingerbread Cookies. Find these recipes and so much more all at the EatingWell website. The EatingWell Magazine would make the perfect Christmas Gift also! http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18044/desserts/

Healthy Cookie and Dessert Recipes
Find healthy, delicious dessert recipes including brownies, cakes, cookies, and pie recipes. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies
Kids and adults alike will love this easy peanut butter chocolate chip cookie recipe, which—unlike most cookie recipes—doesn’t call for flour. These gluten-free peanut butter chocolate chip cookies are soft and chewy and, with only five simple ingredients, they can easily be whipped up by young chefs and enjoyed as an after-school treat. They’re also perfect for a holiday party or for a cookie swap…………

Gluten-Free Fudgy Teff Brownies
Whole-grain teff flour (made from a tiny ancient grain) has a nuance of cocoa flavor to start with, making it a natural choice for brownies. These gluten-free brownies are moist and satisfying, intensely chocolaty and have a tender texture…………….

Gluten-Free Gingerbread Cookies
Gluten-free flour stands in for regular flour in these crisp, festive cut-out cookies that taste amazing. To decorate, dust cookies with sanding sugar before you bake them or drizzle and pipe on royal icing once they’ve cooled…………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cookie and Dessert Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18044/desserts/

Healthy Raspberry Recipes

August 8, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Raspberry Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Raspberry Recipes with recipes like; Yogurt with Rosemary-Red Fruit Compote, Raspberry Mocha Ice Cream Brownie Cake, and Overnight Peach-Raspberry French Toast. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Raspberry Recipes
Find healthy, delicious raspberry recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Yogurt with Rosemary-Red Fruit Compote
A warm cherry, raspberry and cranberry compote—with a savory hint of rosemary— makes a tasty topper for the tangy, thick yogurt in this sophisticated, low-fat dessert……………

Raspberry Mocha Ice Cream Brownie Cake
Who doesn’t love a homemade ice cream cake? This dessert recipe is simple to make and so beautiful your guests won’t believe you made it yourself. A chocolate brownie crust layered with mocha ice cream and topped with raspberry sauce, fresh raspberries, and chocolate syrup—it’s so thick we recommend serving it with a long cake knife, a chef’s knife, or a bread knife……………..

Overnight Peach-Raspberry French Toast
Overnight French toast recipes are easy to prepare and a great choice when you have houseguests who’ll want a hearty and special breakfast in the morning. This recipe is extra-special because the French toast is stuffed with a cream cheese and raspberry filling which becomes an ooey-gooey treat in each bite. Topped with a raspberry sauce, fresh peaches, and powdered sugar, this breakfast recipe will be a hit with everyone at your table…………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Raspberry Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19220/ingredients/fruit/berries/raspberry/

Healthy Vegan Chocolate Recipes

September 27, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Vegan Chocolate Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Vegan Chocolate Recipes like; No-Bake Vegan Date Brownies, Frozen Chocolate-Coconut Milk with Strawberries, and Creamy Chocolate Gelato. Find these healthy and delicious desserts and more all the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Vegan Chocolate Recipes
Find healthy, delicious vegan chocolate recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

No-Bake Vegan Date Brownies
Sweetened with dates, these whole-grain bars provide energy and protein, thanks to nut butter. With just 5 ingredients you probably already have in your pantry, you can make these delicious, chewy brownies with no added sugar. Whip up a batch as a healthy dessert or for grab-and-go energy bars for a healthy snack……..

Frozen Chocolate-Coconut Milk with Strawberries
In this quick dessert recipe, fresh strawberries top nondairy chocolate “ice cream” for a cooling treat…………

Creamy Chocolate Gelato
This ultra-chocolaty, dairy-free Sicilian-style gelato—made without eggs or cream—is relatively lean but still creamy-smooth and flavorful. The coconut milk used for the base gives it a silky, rich mouthfeel and a subtle coconut flavor……..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Vegan Chocolate Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20334/lifestyle-diets/vegan/dessert-baking-recipes/chocolate/

Healthy Peanut Butter Recipes

August 14, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Peanut Butter Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Peanut Butter Recipes like; Chocolate Peanut Butter Icebox Cake, Peanut Butter Swirl Chocolate Brownies, and 4 Ingredient Peanut Butter Cookie. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Peanut Butter Recipes
Find healthy, delicious peanut butter recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Chocolate Peanut Butter Icebox Cake
This no-bake “refrigerator cake” evokes pure nostalgia for childhood treats. Fold peanut butter into whipped cream for a delicately nutty frosting. Then, layer chocolate wafers with the creamy filling, and let it all meld together in the refrigerator for a decadent summertime treat…….

Peanut Butter Swirl Chocolate Brownies
This diabetic-friendly brownie recipe uses the classic flavor combination of chocolate and peanut butter to make a delicious dessert you’ll want to make again and again…….

4 Ingredient Peanut Butter Cookie
This irresistible diabetic-friendly peanut butter cookie recipe contains no flour. For Christmas or special occasions, imprint them with cookie cutters to fit the season instead of the star-shaped cutter……….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Peanut Butter Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19243/ingredients/nuts-seeds/peanut-butter/

Diabetes-Friendly Chocolate Desserts

December 28, 2017 at 6:25 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Diabetes-Friendly Chocolate Desserts. Delicious and Diabetic Friendly Chocolate Desserts like; Double Chocolate Brownies, Chocolate Sherbet, and Devil’s Food Ice Cream Pie. Find these and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and make 2018 a Healthy and Delicious one! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Diabetes-Friendly Chocolate Desserts
Love chocolate? With these chocolate diabetic recipes, you can have your cake and eat it, too. And your brownies and cookies and ice cream!

Double Chocolate Brownies
Two kinds of chocolate make these health-minded brownies hard to resist. Enjoy them for a snack or dessert with a glass of milk…..

Chocolate Sherbet
This chocolatey frozen treat makes the perfect light ending to a hearty holiday meal. Don’t skimp on chilling time for the whipping cream mixture; it needs to be thoroughly chilled to freeze properly……

Devil’s Food Ice Cream Pie
Add the chocolate topping after freezing the pie for the strongest chocolate flavor……

 

* Click the link below to get all the Diabetes-Friendly Chocolate Desserts
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/dessert/diabetes-friendly-chocolate-desserts

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – APPLESAUCE BROWNIES

October 2, 2017 at 5:23 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – APPLESAUCE BROWNIES. Have a Dessert for today’s recipe, APPLESAUCE BROWNIES. Made with unsweetened applesauce and unsweetened cocoa powder. The recipe comes from one of my favorite Diabetic Friendly Recipe sites, the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website (https://diabeticgourmet.com/). The site has a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes so check it out today. Enjoy and Eat Healthy!

 

APPLESAUCE BROWNIES
Ingredients

1/3 cup vegetable oil
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
2 large eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/4 cup chopped nuts

Directions

Preheat oven to 375 F.
Combine oil, applesauce and cocoa. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Add eggs and vanilla. Mix dry ingredients together and stir into the mixture.
Pour the batter into a greased and floured (or wax paper lined & sprayed) 9 inch square pan. Sprinkle on nuts (optional).
Bake about 20 to 30 minutes or until top is set but edges are not dried out. Toothpick will come out clean. Cut into 16 or 24 squares.

Recipe Yield: Servings: 16

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 165
Fat: 7 grams
Sodium: 84 miligrams
Protein: 3 grams
Carbohydrates: 27 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/applesauce-brownies

Our Best Diabetic Cake Recipes

August 27, 2017 at 5:14 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its – Our Best Diabetic Cake Recipes. Have your cake and eat it too with Diabetic Friendly Cake Recipes like; Red Velvet Cake Roll and Orange-Spiced Mini Brownie-Cakes. Find these recipes and so much more at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Our Best Diabetic Cake Recipes
Our favorite diabetic cake recipes are sure to please your sweet tooth and your blood sugar. We used sugar substitutes and light frostings to keep the diabetic desserts low in calories and carbs. Whether you prefer a rich chocolate cake, gorgeous berry cake, or moist coffee cake, we’ve got fresh, diabetes-friendly recipes that you can enjoy guilt-free!

 

Red Velvet Cake Roll
For a fun twist on the traditional red velvet cake, we filled our rolled version with light cream filling. The result: A low-calorie dessert that’s just as decadent as the original…..

 

Orange-Spiced Mini Brownie-Cakes
The citrus in this perfect combination of cake, brownies, and sweet cream sandwiches gives this chocolaty dessert a refreshing twist……..

 

* Click the link below to get all the – Our Best Diabetic Cake Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/dessert/our-best-diabetic-cake-recipes

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