Gotham Greens -Greens On The Roof Of A Brooklyn Warehouse!

September 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM | Posted in vegetables | Leave a comment
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I was watching the Cooking Channel yesterday, Bobby Deen‘s “Not My Mama’s Meals”. On the show he visited a place, in Brooklyn, New York, called Gotham Green. What an amazing story and company! Gardens grown year round on the rooftops in NYC. Below is part of their story and a web link to their site. If you get a chance check them out, some great and interesting reading.

 

 

Gotham Greens was founded in 2008Gotham Greens

by Viraj Puri and Eric Haley who had a vision for a local farm that would offer New York chefs and retailers the freshest and highest quality culinary ingredients, year-round, at competitive prices. Jenn Nelkin, a nationally renowned greenhouse expert, joined Gotham Greens as a partner in 2009 to head all greenhouse operations.
Gotham Greens’ first greenhouse facility, in Greenpoint, Brookyn, will begin harvesting in June 2011. The greenhouse will annually produce over 80 tons of premium quality produce, year-round, that will be available at select retailers, markets and restaurants across the city. In 2012, Gotham Greens plans to expand operations to grow an even more diverse range of premium quality leaf and vine crops.

Gotham Greens is committed to the highest quality standards.

Our growers are passionate about producing the finest quality, freshest, best tasting, and most nutritious culinary ingredients available in New York City. They care about our customers just as much as they care about the every need of our plants, from seed to harvest.
Our products are harvested before breakfast so they can be on your plate by lunch. We don’t just blindly talk about being “local” “sustainable” and “natural”. While our business is about those things, we care about what those things stand for: flavor and nutrition, preserving water and soil resources, biodiversity, reducing harmful chemical use in food production, fair treatment of workers, and spending our dollars closer to home.
Our farm is unconventional. But so is our commitment to quality, taste and sustainability.

Gotham Greens2Gotham Greens’ first greenhouse facility, located on a rooftop in Greenpoint, Brookyn, will begin harvesting in June 2011. Our state of the art rooftop greenhouses combine advanced horticultural and engineering techniques to optimize crop production, crop quality, and production efficiency. The climate controlled facility will grow premium quality produce, year-round.

Greenhouse
Our greenhouse has been designed to give our expert growers complete control of the growing environment — light, temperature, humidity, CO2, nutrition, which ensures unmatched product quality. Our fully enclosed, sterile greenhouses minimize pest and disease risk. Our crops are protected against inclement weather and extreme weather events ensuring reliable and consistent yields. Sophisticated computer control systems manage heating, cooling, irrigation and plant nutrition.

Hydroponics
Hydroponics is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions. Nutrients are delivered to the plant in irrigation water eliminating soil. Water is re-circulated and none is wasted. The sterile, soil-free growing environment eliminates the risk of pathogens that is particularly important in light of the increase in food borne illnesses, such as E coli and salmonella, from fresh vegetables. Hydroponics does not result in any soil erosion nor the loss of precious soil nutrients. Hydroponics allows control over plant nutrition, for optimal flavor and quality. Our specially designed re-circulating hydroponic methods save land, save water, eliminate agricultural runoff and chemical pesticides, and offer the benefits of efficient, high-yield, local, year-round food production.

Year Round Production
By operating year round, Gotham Greens can provide locally grown vegetables and herbs, even in the winter months, when local supply is typically low.

 

http://gothamgreens.com/

Boar’s Head Provision Company

September 1, 2013 at 9:24 AM | Posted in Boar's Head | Leave a comment
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When I purchase Cold Cut Meats from the deli or packaged Cold Cuts I try to go with Boar’s Head Meats. Besides being the best tasting Cold Cuts, for the most part their healthier being lower in sodium, fat, and carbs. Anyway here’s a little background on Boar’s Head and a link to their web site. While there check out their recipe page, it’s loaded!

 

Boarsheadmeatslogo

 

Boar’s Head Provision Company
Boar’s Head Provision Company is a supplier of delicatessen meats and cheeses. The company was founded in 1905 in the New York City area and now distributes its products throughout the United States.

 

 

Boar’s Head Brand® began in the New York City area in 1905. Products were delivered by horse-drawn wagon to small delicatessens and Boars Head Meats“Mom and Pop” stores.

By 1933, distribution of Boar’s Head Brand products had grown. It was at that time that the founder, Frank Brunckhorst, dissatisfied with the quality of cooked hams which were available to him, decided that he would open a manufacturing plant of his own. The first plant was started in a small building in Brooklyn with only three employees.

Even back then there were thousands of delicatessens in New York City, and there were a great number of small manufacturers of delicatessen specialties. The competition among these manufacturers was keen; and as a result, very high standards were set for the quality of delicatessen products. Frank Brunckhorst set his own high standards, and he would not vary from them. Before long, Boar’s Head Brand products could be found in all of the best delicatessens, gourmet stores and fine food establishments in the New York area.

 
Our Mission
Our mission is to continue to be recognized as the leading provider of exceptional customer service and superior quality delicatessen products.
Commitment
We will continuously improve our time-honored traditional processes through the involvement of our dedicated employees.

 

 

http://boarshead.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Crêpe

January 28, 2013 at 10:48 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | 5 Comments
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A crêpe or crepe is a type of very thin pancake, usually made from wheat flour (crêpes de Froment) or buckwheat flour (galettes). The word is of French origin, deriving from the Latin crispa, meaning “curled”. While crêpes originate from Brittany, a region in the northwest of France, their consumption is widespread in France and Quebec. In Brittany, crêpes are traditionally served with cider. Crêpes are served with a variety of fillings, from the most simple with only sugar to flambéed crêpes Suzette or elaborate savoury fillings.
Crêpes are made by pouring a thin liquid batter onto a hot frying pan or flat circular hot plate, often with a trace of butter on the pan’s

A stack of crêpes

A stack of crêpes

surface. The batter is spread evenly over the cooking surface of the pan or plate either by tilting the pan or by distributing the batter with an offset spatula. There are also specially designed crêpe makers with a heatable circular surface that can be dipped in the batter and quickly pulled out to produce an ideal thickness and evenness of cooking.
Common savoury fillings for crêpes served for lunch or dinner are cheese, ham, and eggs, ratatouille, mushrooms, artichoke (in certain regions), and various meat products.
When sweet, they can be eaten as part of breakfast or as a dessert. They can be filled and topped with various sweet toppings, often including Nutella spread, preserves, sugar (granulated or powdered), maple syrup, lemon juice, whipped cream, fruit spreads, custard, and sliced soft fruits or confiture.
Crêpes are especially popular throughout France. The common ingredients include flour, eggs, milk, butter, and a pinch of salt. Crêpes are usually of two types: sweet crêpes (crêpes sucrées) made with wheat flour and slightly sweetened; and savoury galettes (crêpes salées) made with buckwheat flour and unsweetened. The name “galette” came from the French word galet (“pebble”), since the first gallettes were made on a large pebble heated in a fire. Batter made from buckwheat flour is gluten-free, which makes it possible for people who have a gluten allergy or intolerance to eat this type of crêpe.
Mille crêpe is a French cake made of many crêpe layers. The word mille means “a thousand”, implying the many layers of crêpe.
Chocolate-Coconut Crêpe served in crêperie near the Patheon in Paris, France
Another standard French and Belgian crêpe is the crêpe Suzette, a crêpe with lightly grated orange peel and liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) which is subsequently lit upon presentation.
Cherry Kijafa Crêpes are also often common and are made with a traditional crêpe base, but filled with cherries simmered in a Kijafa wine sauce.
Crêpe dentelle is a crispy biscuit made with a very thin layer of crêpe folded in a cigar shape and then baked. It is usually enjoyed with a hot drink during the Goûter, or Afternoon Tea, in France.
A crêperie may be a takeaway restaurant or stall, serving crêpes as a form of fast food or street food, or may be a more formal sit-down restaurant or café.
Crêperies are typical of Brittany in France; however, crêperies can be found throughout France and in many other countries.
Because a crêpe may be served as both a main meal or a dessert, crêperies may be quite diverse in their selection and may offer other baked goods such as baguettes. They may also serve coffee, tea, buttermilk and cider (a popular drink to accompany crêpes).
In Swedish, a crêpe is called pannkaka, and in Danish, pandekage (“pancake”); in Dutch it is a pannenkoek or flensje, and in Afrikaans a

A sweet crêpe served with strawberries and whipped cream

A sweet crêpe served with strawberries and whipped cream

pannekoek, which is usually served with cinnamon sugar. In Italy, crêpes are called crespella. In the Spanish regions of Galicia and Asturias they are traditionally served at carnivals. In Galicia they’re called filloas, and may also be made with pork blood instead of milk. In Asturias they are called fayueles or frixuelos, and in Turkey, “Akıtma”.
In areas of Eastern Europe formerly belonging to the Austro-Hungarian empire, there is a thin pancake comparable[clarification needed] to a crêpe that in Austro-Bavarian is called Palatschinken or Omletten; in Hungarian: palacsinta; and in Bosnian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Montenegrin, Czech, Croatian and Slovene: palačinka; in Slovak: palacinka. In the Balkan region such as the countries of Albania, Bosnia, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia, palačinka or palaçinka may be eaten with fruit jam, quark cheese, sugar, honey, or the hazelnut-chocolate cream Nutella. In Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine, there is a similar dish known as the blintz. The Oxford English Dictionary derives the German and Slavic words from the Hungarians palacsinta, which it derives from the Romanian plăcintă (“pie, pancake”), which comes in turn from classical Latin placenta (“small flat cake”). In Chile and Argentina they are called panqueques and are often eaten with dulce de leche (known in English as “milk caramel”).
Crêpes have also become popular in Japan, with sweet and savoury varieties being sold at many small stands, usually called crêperies. They have also become popular in North America with several crêpe franchises opening. Typically, these franchises stick to the traditional French method of making crêpes but they have also put their own spin on the crêpe with new types such as the hamburger and pizza crêpe.
In addition to crêperies and crêpe franchises, there are crêpe manufacturers that use modern equipment to produce crêpes in bulk. Crepini, a crêpe producer based in Brooklyn, New York, makes a variety of Naked and filled crêpes that are sold by local retailers, major supermarket chains, and food service providers throughout North America and Canada.
In France, crêpes are traditionally served on Candlemas (La Chandeleur), February 2. This day was originally Virgin Mary’s Blessing Day, but became known in France as “Le Jour des Crêpes” (literally translated “The Day of [the] Crêpes”, but sometimes given colloquially as “Avec Crêpe Day” or “National Crêpe Day”), referring to the tradition of offering crêpes. The belief was that if you could catch the crêpe with a frying pan after tossing it in the air with your right hand and holding a gold coin in your left hand, you would become rich that year.

 

 
Basic Crepes

INGREDIENTS:
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 eggs
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup water
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons butter, melted
DIRECTIONS:
1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour and the eggs. Gradually add in the milk and water, stirring to combine. Add the salt and butter; beat until smooth.
2. Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each crepe. Tilt the pan with a circular motion so that the batter coats the surface evenly.
3. Cook the crepe for about 2 minutes, until the bottom is light brown. Loosen with a spatula, turn and cook the other side. Serve hot.

*Makes 4 servings

Audience Vote Crowns Winner of “Food Network Star”

July 23, 2012 at 10:10 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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THE VIEWERS HAVE SPOKEN!

AUDIENCE VOTE CROWNS JUSTIN WARNER WINNER OF “FOOD NETWORK STAR

Winner’s Series Produced by Star Mentor Alton Brown Slated for Fall Premiere

NEW YORK – July 23, 2012 – After a groundbreaking eighth season and an audience vote tallying 4.5 million, America has chosen Brooklyn’s Justin Warner as winner of Food Network Star’s ultimate grand prize – his own Food Network series, to be produced by his Star mentor Alton Brown. Known for his “Rebel with a Culinary Cause” point-of-view, Justin distinguished himself with a witty on-camera presence and unique, edgy spins on every dish he created – all fine-tuned over the course of the series by Food Network icon Brown. Over 30 million viewers tuned in to season eight of the hit series, which began in May with culinary superstars Brown, Giada De Laurentiis and Bobby Flay each hand-selecting a team of five finalists to produce and mentor through the Star experience to find one winner who possesses personality and kitchen chops. The finale came down to four finalists – Justin and Martie Duncan (Birmingham, Ala.) from Team Alton, Yvan Lemoine (Maspeth, N.Y.) from Team Giada and Michele Ragussis (Brooklyn, N.Y.) from Team Bobby. The winner’s new series is scheduled for a fall premiere on Food Network.

“Justin is a rule breaker in the best possible sense, much like his mentor Alton Brown. He approaches food with a quirky sense of joy that made him stand out from the very beginning of the season,” said Bob Tuschman, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Food Network. “Viewers certainly agreed, and we are thrilled to welcome him and his distinct culinary voice to Food Network.”

“I had a feeling about Justin the first time we met, when he auditioned for me in Atlanta. I couldn’t put my finger on it, but I’m pretty sure it’s because I thought I saw a little me in him – deep down, we all want to replicate ourselves,” said Brown. “But as soon as the competition cranked up, it became clear that Justin is an original, possessing a singular culinary vision. I did very little to steer him through the weeks that followed, mostly I tried to make sure his real character came through in each challenge. It’s been a great honor to accompany him on this part of his journey.”

Justin Warner is a self-taught cook and owner/chef of Do or Dine, a restaurant in Brooklyn, N.Y. that he and his partners built from the ground up. Originally from Hagerstown, Md. he began working in restaurants at just thirteen years old and has knowledge of the industry that extends way beyond his years. Justin’s approach to food reflects his personality – edgy, intense, passionate and witty.

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