Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 29, 2013 at 10:18 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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While perusing the cereal aisle, you’ll quickly realize that hot cereals are cheaper than cold ones. Though they may not be as popular with your family, try saving money by making hot cereal at least once a week. It’s often more nutritious, so it’s worth it to make the switch

One of America’s Favorites – Breakfast Cereal

October 8, 2012 at 10:08 AM | Posted in breakfast, cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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A breakfast cereal (or just cereal) is a food made from processed grains that is often eaten with the first meal of the day. It is often

Cold breakfast cereal with milk and raspberries

eaten cold, usually mixed with milk (e.g. cow’s milk, soy milk, rice milk, almond milk), juice, water, or yogurt, and sometimes fruit, but may be eaten dry. Some companies promote their products for the health benefits from eating oat-based and high-fiber cereals. Cereals may be fortified with vitamins. Some cereals are made with high sugar content. Many breakfast cereals are produced via extrusion.

The breakfast cereal industry has gross profit margins of 40-45%, 90% penetration in some markets, and steady and continued growth throughout its history.

 

Porridge was a traditional food in much of Northern Europe and Russia back to antiquity. Barley was a common grain used, though other grains and yellow peas could be used. In many modern cultures, porridge is still eaten as a breakfast dish.

The first breakfast cereal, Granula was invented in the United States in 1863 by James Caleb Jackson, operator of Our Home on the Hillside which was later replaced by the Jackson Sanatorium in Dansville, New York. The cereal never became popular since it was inconvenient, as the heavy bran nuggets needed soaking overnight before they were tender enough to eat. Ready-to-eat breakfast cereals have their beginnings in the vegetarian movement in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, which influenced members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the United States.

The American Cereal Company (Quaker Oats) created a cereal made from oats in 1877, manufacturing the product in Akron, Ohio. Separately, George H. Hoyt created Wheatena circa 1879, during an era when retailers would typically buy cereal (the most popular being cracked wheat, oatmeal, and cerealine) in barrel lots, and scoop it out to sell by the pound to customers. Hoyt, who had found a distinctive process of preparing wheat for cereal, sold his cereal in boxes, offering consumers a sanitary appeal.

Packaged breakfast cereals were considerably more convenient and combined with clever marketing, they caught on. In 1877, John Harvey Kellogg, operator of the Battle Creek Sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan, invented a biscuit made of ground-up wheat, oat, and cornmeal for his patients suffering from bowel problems. The product was initially also named “Granula”, but changed to “Granola” after a lawsuit. His most famous contribution, however, was an accident. After leaving a batch of boiled wheat soaking overnight and rolling it out, Kellogg had created wheat flakes. His brother Will Keith Kellogg later invented corn flakes from a similar method, bought out his brother’s share in their business, and went on to found the Kellogg Company in 1906. With his shrewd marketing and advertising, Kellogg’s sold their one millionth case after three years.

In 1902 Force wheat flakes became the first ready-to-eat breakfast cereal introduced into the United Kingdom. The cereal, and the Sunny Jim character, achieved wide success in Britain, at its peak in 1930 selling 12.5 million packages.

In the 1930s, the first puffed cereal, Kix, went on the market. Beginning after World War II, the big breakfast cereal companies – now

A bowl of corn flakes with milk.

including General Mills, who entered the market in 1924 with Wheaties – increasingly started to target children. The flour was refined to remove fiber, which at the time was considered to make digestion and absorption of nutrients difficult, and sugar was added to improve the flavor for children. The new breakfast cereals began to look starkly different from their ancestors. As one example, Kellogg’s Sugar Smacks, created in 1953, had 56% sugar by weight. Different mascots were introduced, such as the Rice Krispies elves and later pop icons like Tony the Tiger and the Trix Rabbit.

Because of Kellogg and Post, the city of Battle Creek, Michigan is nicknamed the “Cereal Capital of the World”.

Processing is the modification of a grain or mixture of grains usually taking place in a facility remote from the location where the product is eaten. This distinguishes “breakfast cereals” from foods made from grains modified and cooked in the place where they are eaten.

Muesli is a breakfast cereal based on uncooked rolled oats, fruit, and nuts. It was developed around 1900 by the Swiss physician Maximilian Bircher-Benner for patients in his hospital. It is available in a packaged dry form such as Alpen, or it can be made fresh.

Most warm cereals can be classified as porridges, in that they consist of cereal grains which are soaked and/or boiled to soften them and make them palatable. Sweeteners, such as brown sugar, honey, or maple syrup, are often added either by the manufacturer, during cooking, or before eating.

Oatmeal is popular in the United States, and cream of wheat is widely available if less popular. Grits is a porridge of native American origin made from corn (maize) which is popular in the South.

What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

September 18, 2012 at 2:40 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food | 1 Comment
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Another great article from Diabetic Living On Line web site. You can click the web link at the bottom to read the entire article and cereal rankings.
What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals
By Jessie Shafer and Elizabeth Burt, R.D., L.D.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O’s, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.

Taste-Tested and Diabetes-Friendly
With options ranging from colorful sugar bombs to bland fiber buds, cold cereal choices may seem either tasty-but-bad-for-you or boring-but-healthful. We’re here to show you there’s a happy medium for your breakfast bowl!

Through a series of dietitian approvals for nutritional requirements and taste tests with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, we narrowed 70 qualifying cereals down to six winners and 12 tasty finalists. These “best of the bowl” cereals were awarded our Diabetic Living What to Eat™ seal of approval. Pour one to taste how yummy healthful options can be!

Nutritional Guidelines

Every cereal tested had to meet these health requirements per serving (without milk):

— 150 calories or less

— Less than 30 percent of calories from fat

— 1 g saturated fat or less

— 0 g trans fat

— 30 g carb or less

— Less than 8 g sugars

— At least 3 g fiber

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/what-to-eat/best-cereals-to-eat-with-diabetes/?sssdmh=dm17.618512&esrc=nwdlo091812

Taste-Tested and Diabetes-Friendly

February 25, 2012 at 10:43 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Taste-Tested and Diabetes-Friendly

Good article on Breakfast Cereal from www.diabeticlivingonline.com. You can read all the results by clicking the link at the bottom of the post.

With options ranging from colorful sugar bombs to bland fiber buds, cold cereal choices may seem either tasty-but-bad-for-you or boring-but-healthful. We’re here to show you there’s a happy medium for your breakfast bowl!

Through a series of dietitian approvals for nutritional requirements and taste tests with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, we narrowed 70 qualifying cereals down to six winners and 12 tasty finalists. These “best of the bowl” cereals were awarded our Diabetic Living What to Eat™ seal of approval. Pour one to taste how yummy healthful options can be!

Nutritional Guidelines

Every cereal tested had to meet these health requirements per serving (without milk):

— 150 calories or less

— Less than 30 percent of calories from fat

— 1 g saturated fat or less

— 0 g trans fat

— 30 g carb or less

— Less than 8 g sugars

— At least 3 g fiber

Flavored Flakes Finalists

After analyzing the nutrition content of hundreds of cereals, we were surprised to find some brands that were previously thought to be too high in sugar and calories that actually qualified for our taste test. Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes was one such example. Its new formula for a reduced-sugar cereal with added fiber makes it one of several healthful options.

Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes with Fiber, Less Sugar

Per serving (3/4 cup): 110 cal., 0 g total fat, 0 mg chol., 160 mg sodium, 26 g carb. (3 g fiber, 8 g sugars), 2 g pro.

Kellogg’s Special K Cinnamon Pecan

Per serving (3/4 cup): 120 cal., 2 g total fat (0 g sat. fat), 0 mg chol., 180 mg sodium, 24 g carb. (3 g fiber, 7 g sugars), 2 g pro.

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/what-to-eat/best-cereals-to-eat-with-diabetes/?sssdmh=dm17.581108&esrc=nwdlo022112&email=2933188293

What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

February 9, 2012 at 10:28 AM | Posted in breakfast, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Ran across this on Diabetic Living On Line and thought I would pass it along to all you cereal lovers! You can follow the link at the end of the post to read the entire article.

What to Eat with Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

By Jessie Shafer and Elizabeth Burt, R.D., L.D.
Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O’s, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval.

Taste-Tested and Diabetes-Friendly

With options ranging from colorful sugar bombs to bland fiber buds, cold cereal choices may seem either tasty-but-bad-for-you or boring-but-healthful. We’re here to show you there’s a happy medium for your breakfast bowl!

Through a series of dietitian approvals for nutritional requirements and taste tests with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, we narrowed 70 qualifying cereals down to six winners and 12 tasty finalists. These “best of the bowl” cereals were awarded our Diabetic Living What to Eat™ seal of approval. Pour one to taste how yummy healthful options can be!

Nutritional Guidelines

Every cereal tested had to meet these health requirements per serving (without milk):

— 150 calories or less

— Less than 30 percent of calories from fat

— 1 g saturated fat or less

— 0 g trans fat

— 30 g carb or less

— Less than 8 g sugars

— At least 3 g fiber

Flavored Flakes Finalists

After analyzing the nutrition content of hundreds of cereals, we were surprised to find some brands that were previously thought to be too high in sugar and calories that actually qualified for our taste test. Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes was one such example. Its new formula for a reduced-sugar cereal with added fiber makes it one of several healthful options.

Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes with Fiber, Less Sugar

Per serving (3/4 cup): 110 cal., 0 g total fat, 0 mg chol., 160 mg sodium, 26 g carb. (3 g fiber, 8 g sugars), 2 g pro.

Kellogg’s Special K Cinnamon Pecan

Per serving (3/4 cup): 120 cal., 2 g total fat (0 g sat. fat), 0 mg chol., 180 mg sodium, 24 g carb. (3 g fiber, 7 g sugars), 2 g pro.

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/what-to-eat/best-cereals-to-eat-with-diabetes/?sssdmh=dm17.578571&esrc=nwdlo020712&email=

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