Kitchen Hint of the Week!

November 20, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Making Breadcrumbs………….

Store-bought breadcrumbs tend to be pretty bland. Fortunately, it’s easy to make a healthy, flavorful alternative that will spice up any recipe right at home. Simply crush stale or toasted bread along with herbs and spices in your blender for a crispy crust that’s light-years away from those sad canned crumbs.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

August 21, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Pass the Cornflakes………………

For added crunch with fewer calories, use Cornflakes instead breadcrumbs to coat fish fillets. Not only do Cornflakes contain fewer calories than breadcrumbs, they are less absorbent and give a lighter covering, so the fish will absorb less oil.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 20, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Save that stale bread………

Save old, stale bread to make breadcrumbs in a food processor; you can freeze them for up to 6 months. When making your breadcrumbs you can season with your favorite herbs or spices.

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Italian Turkey Meatloaf

February 2, 2018 at 6:41 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Italian Turkey Meatloaf. Made using both JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey and JENNIE-O® Lean Sweet Italian Turkey Sausage. It’s a healthier version of a Dinner Classic. Only 240 calories and 8 net carbs per serving! You can find this recipe along with all the other healthy and delicious recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

Italian Turkey Meatloaf
Looking for a lean Italian meatloaf recipe without all the carbs? Bake up flavors of the old country with basil tomato sauce, garlic and sweet Italian turkey sausage. A great weeknight dinner.

INGREDIENTS

1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey
1 (19.5-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Sweet Italian Turkey Sausage, casings removed
½ cup fresh breadcrumbs
¼ cup egg substitute or 1 egg
1 cup prepared tomato and basil pasta sauce, divided
1 clove garlic, minced
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
¾ teaspoon salt, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350ºF. Spray a 8½ x 4½-inch loaf pan with cooking spray. In large bowl, combine ground turkey, sausage, breadcrumbs, egg, ½ cup pasta sauce, garlic, pepper and salt, if desired; mix well.
2) Put turkey mixture into loaf pan. Spread remaining ½ cup pasta sauce over meatloaf. Bake 1 hour and 45 minutes or until loaf is well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Let stand at room temperature 10 minutes before slicing.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 240
Protein 24g
Carbohydrates 9g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 3g
Fat 11g
Cholesterol 80mg
Sodium 680mg
Saturated Fat 3g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/226-italian-turkey-meatloaf

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Burger Wrap with Creamy Salsa

May 12, 2017 at 5:06 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is a Turkey Burger Wrap with Creamy Salsa. The Burger is made using the always fresh and delicious JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey. Along with Salsa,Breadcrumbs, and Spices. Then topped with Greek Yogurt Sauce, Tomatoes, and Avocado and served on Lettuce Leaves. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O website along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes. Enjoy and Make the Switch! https://www.jennieo.com/

 
Turkey Burger Wrap with Creamy Salsa

Lighten up your dinner with these creamy salsa turkey burgers wrapped in hearty lettuce leaves. Topped with delicious Greek yogurt sauce and avocado, this dish is a total crowd pleaser and ready under 30 minutes!

 

INGREDIENTS

1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey
1 cup LA VICTORIA® Medium Thick n’ Chunky Salsa, divided or CHI-CHI’S® Medium Thick n’ Chunky Salsa, divided
½ teaspoon ground cumin
3 tablespoons freshly chopped cilantro
¼ cup plain breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons olive oil
½ teaspoon salt and freshly ground pepper, if desired
¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
4 Bibb lettuce leaves
4 slices tomato
1 avocado, peeled and sliced
DIRECTIONS

1) In medium mixing bowl, combine ground turkey, ½ cup of salsa, cumin, cilantro, breadcrumbs, olive oil and salt and pepper, if desired; mix well and form into 4½-inch thick patties.
2) Spray skillet with non-stick cooking spray. Preheat skillet over medium-high heat. Add burger patties to hot skillet. Cook approximately 14 to 16 minutes, flipping 3 times. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
3) In small mixing bowl, combine yogurt and reserved ½ cup salsa.
4) On lettuce leaves, top with tomato, avocado, turkey burger and creamy salsa.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories 330
Protein 25g
Carbohydrates 12g
Fiber 5g
Sugars 4g
Fat 20g
Cholesterol 80mg
Sodium 530mg
Saturated Fat 4.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1167-turkey-burger-wrap-with-creamy-salsa

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 18, 2016 at 6:16 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Save the Bread……

 

 

Save all kinds of leftover bread, bagels, baguettes, sandwich loaves, rolls, crackers, biscuits, and pulse to very fine crumbs in the food processor. Freeze in self-sealing plastic bags and use for stuffings and toppings.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 21, 2016 at 5:12 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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If your kids are picky eaters and refuse to eat their bread crusts, don’t throw them away. Turn them into breadcrumbs. Crumble the crusts in a food processor, add dried herbs and grated cheese, then freeze them. Use the mix on meals that require a breadcrumb topping. No crust wasted!

One of America’s Favorites – Stuffing

February 1, 2016 at 5:55 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Stuffed turkey

Stuffed turkey

Stuffing, filling or dressing is an edible substance or mixture, often a starch, used to fill a cavity in another food item while cooking. Many foods may be stuffed, including eggs, poultry, seafood, mammals, and vegetables.

Turkey stuffing often consists of dried bread, in the form of croutons, cubes or breadcrumbs, pork sausage meat, onion, celery, salt, pepper, and other spices and herbs such as summer savoury, sage, or a mixture like poultry seasoning. Giblets are often used. Popular additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (notably apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.

 
It is not known when stuffings were first used. The earliest documentary evidence is the Roman cookbook, Apicius De Re Coquinaria, which contains recipes for stuffed chicken, dormouse, hare, and pig. Most of the stuffings described consist of vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts, and spelt (an old cereal), and frequently contain chopped liver, brains, and other organ meat.

Names for stuffing include “farce” (~1390), “stuffing” (1538), “forcemeat” (1688), and relatively more recently in the United States; “dressing” (1850).

 

 

Stuffed Parasol mushroom

Stuffed Parasol mushroom

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of animals, including birds, fish, and mammals, various cuts of meat may be stuffed after they have been deboned or a pouch has been cut into them. Popular recipes include stuffed chicken legs, stuffed pork chops, stuffed breast of veal, as well as the traditional holiday stuffed turkey or goose.

Many types of vegetables are also suitable for stuffing, after their seeds or flesh has been removed. Tomatoes, capsicums (sweet or hot peppers), vegetable marrows (e.g., zucchini) may be prepared in this way. Cabbages and similar vegetables can also be stuffed or wrapped around a filling. They are usually blanched first, in order to make their leaves more pliable. Then, the interior may be replaced by stuffing, or small amounts of stuffing may be inserted between the individual leaves.

It is sometimes claimed that the ancient Roman, as well as medieval, cooks stuffed animals with other animals. An anonymous Andalusian cookbook from the 13th century includes a recipe for a ram stuffed with small birds. A similar recipe for a camel stuffed with sheep stuffed with bustards stuffed with carp stuffed with eggs is mentioned in T.C. Boyle’s book Water Music.

British celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has championed the ten-bird roast, calling it “one of the most spectacular and delicious roasts you can lay before your loved ones at Yuletide”. A large turkey is stuffed with a goose, duck, mallard, guinea fowl, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon, and woodcock. The roast feeds approximately 30 people and, as well as the ten birds, includes stuffing made from two pounds of sausage meat and half a pound of streaky bacon, along with sage, and port and red wine.

In the United States and Eastern Canada, multi-bird dishes are sometimes served on special occasions. See gooducken and turducken.

 

 

Stuffed orange pepper

Stuffed orange pepper

Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many popular Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination thereof. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, or forcemeat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes,and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

 
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing/dressing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds. (Stuffing is never recommended for turkeys to be fried, grilled, microwaved, or smoked).

 

One of America’s Favorites – Bread Crumbs

August 10, 2015 at 5:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Breadcrumbs from a box on a plate

Breadcrumbs from a box on a plate

Bread crumbs or breadcrumbs (regional variants: breading, crispies) are small particles of dry bread, used for breading or crumbing foods, topping casseroles, stuffing poultry, thickening stews, adding inexpensive bulk to meatloaves and similar foods, and making a crisp and crunchy coating for fried foods, especially breaded cutlets like tonkatsu and schnitzel. The Japanese variety of bread crumbs is called panko.

 

 

Dry breadcrumbs
Dry breadcrumbs are made from dry breads which have been baked or toasted to remove most remaining moisture, and may even have a sandy or even powdery texture. Bread crumbs are most easily produced by pulverizing slices of bread in a food processor, using a steel blade to make coarse crumbs, or a grating blade to make fine crumbs. A grater or similar tool will also do.

 

Fresh breadcrumbs
The breads used to make soft or fresh bread crumbs are not quite as dry, so the crumbs are larger and produce a softer coating, crust, or stuffing. The crumb of bread crumb is also a term that refers to the texture of the soft, inner part of a bread loaf, as distinguished from the crust, or “skin”.

 

Panko

Baked panko crusted pork

Baked panko crusted pork

Panko is a variety of flaky bread crumb used in Japanese cuisine as a crunchy coating for fried foods, such as tonkatsu. Panko is made from bread baked by grinding the dough to create fine slivers of crumb, yielding bread without crusts. It has a crisper, airier texture than most types of breading found in Western cuisine and resists absorbing oil or grease when fried, resulting in a lighter coating. Outside Japan, its use is becoming more popular in both Asian and non-Asian dishes: It is often used on fish and seafood and is often available in Asian markets, speciality stores, and, increasingly, in many large supermarkets.

Panko is produced worldwide, particularly in Asian countries, including Japan, Korea, Thailand, China, and Vietnam.

Cornmeal breading

Cornmeal breading

Breading (also known as crumbing) is a dry grain-derived food coating for a piece of food made from bread crumbs or a breading mixture with seasonings. Breading can also refer to the process of applying a bread-like coating to a food. Breading is well suited for frying as it lends itself to creating a crisp coating around the food. Breading mixtures can be made of breadcrumb, flour, cornmeal, and seasoning that the item to be breaded is dredged in before cooking. If the item to be breaded is too dry for the coating to stick, the item may first be moistened with buttermilk, raw egg, or other liquid.

 

Breading contrasts with batter, which is a grain-based liquid coating for food that produces a smoother and finer texture, but which can be softer overall.

 

Seafood of the Week – Clams Casino

May 27, 2014 at 5:38 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
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Clams casino over rock salt with lemon and parsley garnish

Clams casino over rock salt with lemon and parsley garnish

Clams casino is a clam “on the halfshell” dish with breadcrumbs and bacon. It originated in Rhode Island in the United States. It is often served as an appetizer in New England and is served in variations nationally.

 

 

 
The dish uses littlenecks or cherrystone clams. Other basic ingredients include butter, peppers, bacon and garlic. Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper, white wine, lemon juice, and shallots or onion are also used. Tabasco sauce is sometimes added, and parsley is sometimes used as a garnish.

 

 

 
The clams, bacon, and other ingredients are cooked in various ways depending on the recipe, and then added with breading to half the clam shell and baked or broiled (grilled from above) to a golden brown.

The dish is popular with Italian-Americans, having “a permanent spot on just about every trattoria menu” in Little Italy, Manhattan, and is considered an American classic. Clams casino is often served at Italian festivals and during the holidays[6] in the United States.

There are many variations on the dish, but the constant factor is the bacon: “Bacon remains the major key to its success”, with some chefs recommending smoked bacon for its salty flavor and others advocating an unsmoked variety.

 

 

 
According to legend, the recipe for clams casino was originally developed in 1917 in the Little Casino in Narragansett, Rhode Island, by a maître d’hôtel for a woman of means wanting something special for her guests. Good Housekeeping Great American Classics attributes the dish to Mrs. Paran Stevens and maître d’hôtel Julius Keller. She named the dish after the hotel, and word and popularity of the dish has since spread across the United States, including New Orleans, where oysters are substituted for clams. Clams casino remains a very popular dish in Rhode Island, “appearing on almost every menu”.

“In the first decades of this century (20th), if a restaurant wanted to be noted, it came up with a dish that involved the baking of shellfish”. While there was a profusion of this type of menu offering (often with the meat taken out of the shell prepared with sauce and returned to the shell), clams casino and oysters Rockefeller “are among the few surviving dishes from the shellfish fad”.

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