Healthy Breakfast Toast Recipes

February 26, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Breakfast Toast Recipes. Start your day off with these Delicious and Healthy Breakfast Toast Recipes with recipes like; Overnight Peach-Raspberry French Toast, Avocado-Egg Toast, and Maple-Apple Drenched French Toast. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

Healthy Breakfast Toast Recipes
Find healthy, delicious toast recipes for breakfast, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Overnight Peach-Raspberry French Toast
Overnight French toast recipes are easy to prepare and a great choice when you have houseguests who’ll want a hearty and special breakfast in the morning. This recipe is extra-special because the French toast is stuffed with a cream cheese and raspberry filling which becomes an ooey-gooey treat in each bite. Topped with a raspberry sauce, fresh peaches, and powdered sugar, this breakfast recipe will be a hit with everyone at your table………

Avocado-Egg Toast
Try it once and we think you’ll agree: Topping avocado toast with an egg is a near-perfect breakfast……….

Maple-Apple Drenched French Toast
Topped with tasty pecans and a delicious apple and maple syrup blend, this French toast is sure to become a go-to recipe for special breakfasts or brunches……..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Breakfast Toast Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18662/mealtimes/breakfast-brunch/toast/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 20, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Save that stale bread………

Save old, stale bread to make breadcrumbs in a food processor; you can freeze them for up to 6 months. When making your breadcrumbs you can season with your favorite herbs or spices.

Big Cheese Festival February 9 – 10 | 12-5pm

February 5, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Festivals | 2 Comments
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When: February 9, 2019 12:00pm – 5:00pm
February 10, 2019 12:00pm – 5:00pm
Where:
Oscar Event Center, Jungle Jim’s Fairfield (https://junglejims.com/)
5440 Dixie Hwy Fairfield,OH 45014
Cost: Starting at $15

 

Our annual Big Cheese Festival is the ultimate two-day homage to fromage! We bring out the best and the brightest of the cheese and charcuterie world for you to taste, enjoy, and savor with expertly-selected beer and wine pairings. Family-friendly and crafted for enthusiastic amateurs, connoisseurs, and fanatics alike, the Big Cheese Festival is the premier event for fromagers everywhere! This year, we’re going Big (Cheese) with a brand new, completely remodeled VIP experience that includes a VIPs-only lounge, exclusive cheeses that will only be available to VIPs, and beer, wine, and whiskey samples! Visit the ticket page for VIP, General Admission, and Kids pricing and details!
https://junglejims.com/big-cheese-festival-2/

Healthy Linguine Recipes

January 5, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Linguine Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Linguine Recipes like; Cheesy Vegetable Pasta Alfredo, Seafood Linguine, and Leek and Lemon Linguine. Find these Healthy and Delicious Pasta Recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Linguine Recipes
Find healthy, delicious linguine recipes including seafood, shrimp and clam sauce linguini. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Cheesy Vegetable Pasta Alfredo
This cheesy pasta recipe is made in a slow cooker but is relatively quick taking just 2½ hours from start-to-finish. It’s full of vegetables, whole-grain linguine and of course, lots of cheese!….

Seafood Linguine
This restaurant-worthy seafood pasta dish is a snap to make and an easy way to impress guests. We like the sweet taste and extra-saucy consistency of canned diced San Marzano tomatoes in sauces like this one. Marjoram pairs well with the seafood, but basil or even parsley works too. Serve with a Caesar salad………….

Leek and Lemon Linguine
This simple pasta recipe has bold lemony flavor. It’s nice with a salad for a light supper or serve it along with seared fish, shrimp or chicken. Vary it as you please—add a bit of crumbled goat cheese, chopped rinsed capers, shelled edamame or thin strips of yellow bell pepper………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Linguine Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19255/ingredients/pasta-noodle/pasta-by-shape/linguine/

One of America’s Favorites – Stuffing

December 10, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Stuffing a turkey

Stuffing or filling is an edible substance or mixture, normally consisting primarily of small cut-up pieces of bread or a similar starch and served as a side dish or used to fill a cavity in another food item while cooking. Many foods may be stuffed, including eggs, poultry, seafood, mammals, and vegetables, but chickens and turkey are the most common. Stuffing serves the dual purpose of helping to keep the meat moist while also adding to the mix of flavors of both the stuffing and the thing it is stuffed in.

Poultry stuffing often consists of dried breadcrumbs, onion, celery, salt, pepper, and other spices and herbs, a popular herb being sage. Giblets are often used. Popular additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (notably apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.

 

 

Stuffed turkey

It is not known when stuffings were first used. The earliest documentary evidence is the Roman cookbook, Apicius De Re Coquinaria, which contains recipes for stuffed chicken, dormouse, hare, and pig. Most of the stuffings described consist of vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts, and spelt (an old cereal), and frequently contain chopped liver, brains, and other organ meat.

Names for stuffing include “farce” (~1390), “stuffing” (1538), “forcemeat” (1688), and relatively more recently in the United States; “dressing” (1850).

 

 

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of animals, including birds, fish, and mammals, various cuts of meat may be stuffed after they have been deboned or a pouch has been cut into them. Popular recipes include stuffed chicken legs, stuffed pork chops, stuffed breast of veal, as well as the traditional holiday stuffed turkey or goose.

Many types of vegetables are also suitable for stuffing, after their seeds or flesh has been removed. Tomatoes, capsicums (sweet or hot peppers), vegetable marrows (e.g., zucchini) may be

Stuffed Parasol mushroom

prepared in this way. Cabbages and similar vegetables can also be stuffed or wrapped around a filling. They are usually blanched first, in order to make their leaves more pliable. Then, the interior may be replaced by stuffing, or small amounts of stuffing may be inserted between the individual leaves.

It is sometimes claimed that ancient Roman and medieval cooks stuffed animals with other animals. An anonymous Andalusian cookbook from the 13th century includes a recipe for a ram stuffed with small birds. A similar recipe for a camel stuffed with sheep stuffed with bustards stuffed with carp stuffed with eggs is mentioned in T.C. Boyle’s book Water Music.

British celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has championed the ten-bird roast, calling it “one of the most spectacular and delicious roasts you can lay before your loved ones at Yuletide”. A large turkey is stuffed with a goose, duck, mallard, guinea fowl, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon, and woodcock. The roast feeds approximately 30 people and, as well as the ten birds, includes stuffing made from two pounds of sausage meat and half a pound of streaky bacon, along with sage, and port and red wine.

In the United States and eastern Canada, multi-bird dishes are sometimes served on special occasions.

 

Stuffed orange pepper

Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many popular Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination thereof. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, or forcemeat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes, and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

 

 

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing/dressing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds. (Stuffing is never recommended for turkeys to be fried, grilled, microwaved, or smoked).

 

Healthy French Toast Recipes

December 4, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy French Toast Recipes. Start your day off with some delicious and healthy French Toast with recipes like; Pumpkin-Walnut Baked French Toast with Maple-Coffee Syrup, Maple-Apple Drenched French Toast, and Stuffed French Toast. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy French Toast Recipes
Find healthy, delicious French toast recipes including cinnamon and low-calorie French toast. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Pumpkin-Walnut Baked French Toast with Maple-Coffee Syrup
This overnight French toast recipe is especially tasty with the addition of canned pumpkin and spices. Topped with a coffee-flavored maple syrup and optional fruit, it’s sure to be a fall or winter favorite with everyone at your table………

Maple-Apple Drenched French Toast
Topped with tasty pecans and a delicious apple and maple syrup blend, this French toast is sure to become a go-to recipe for special breakfasts or brunches……………

Stuffed French Toast
One slice of French toast oozing with cream cheese and drizzled with melted fruit spread does not have many more calories or grams of fat than a bowl of most breakfast cereals……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy French Toast Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22784/mealtimes/breakfast-brunch/toast/french-toast/

Healthy Diabetic Recipes

November 23, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Diabetic Recipes. i have Diabetes 2 myself and I love this website! So here’s some Delicious and Healthy Diabetic Recipes with recipes like; Turkey and Brown Rice Chili, Sweet Potato Hash Browns, and Whole-Wheat Cranberry Dinner Rolls. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Looking for a good recipe Magazine, look no further the EatingWell Magazine. I’m a long time subscriber and have found so many recipes through the years. So subscribe today! Well Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Diabetic Recipes
Find healthy, delicious diabetic recipes including main dishes, drinks, snacks and desserts from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Turkey and Brown Rice Chili
This hearty turkey chili recipe takes just 35 minutes to prep. While its cooking, you’ll have time to throw together a green salad and warm up some crusty bread to complete the meal…..

Sweet Potato Hash Browns
Colorful, fiber-packed shredded sweet potatoes stand in for regular potatoes in this crispy hashbrown recipe. Want to take it up a notch? Jazz them up by adding jalapeños or herbs. Or, serve them with fried eggs for a complete and satisfying meal………….

Whole-Wheat Cranberry Dinner Rolls
These buttery thyme-seasoned knotted dinner rolls have a sweet and tangy cranberry-ginger topping baked right in. The prep time is only 20 minutes thanks to frozen whole-wheat bread dough, so you can make these any night of the week…………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Diabetic Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17899/health-condition/diabetic/

One of America’s Favorites – Turkey

November 19, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Turkey meat, commonly referred to as just turkey, is the meat from turkeys, typically domesticated turkeys. It is a popular poultry product, especially in North America where it is traditionally

A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal.

consumed as part of culturally significant events such as Thanksgiving and Christmas as well as in standard cuisine.

Turkeys are sold sliced and ground, as well as “whole” in a manner similar to chicken with the head, feet, and feathers removed. Frozen whole turkeys remain popular. Sliced turkey is frequently used as a sandwich meat or served as cold cuts; in some cases where recipes call for chicken it can be used as a substitute. Ground turkey is sold, and frequently marketed as a healthy alternative to ground beef. Without careful preparation, cooked turkey is usually considered to end up less moist than other poultry meats such as chicken or duck.

Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (including the breast) with a more intense flavor. The flavor can also vary seasonally with changes in available forage, often leaving wild turkey meat with a gamier flavor in late summer, due to the greater number of insects in its diet over the preceding months. Wild turkey that has fed predominantly on grass and grain has a milder flavor. Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor.

A large amount of turkey meat is processed. It can be smoked and as such is sometimes sold as turkey ham or turkey bacon, which is widely considered to be far healthier than pork-based bacon. Twisted helices of deep-fried turkey meat, sold as “turkey twizzlers”, came to prominence in the UK in 2004 when chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to have them and similar foods removed from school dinners.

Unlike chicken eggs, turkey eggs are not commonly sold as food due to the high demand for whole turkeys and lower output of eggs as compared with other fowl (not only chickens, but even ducks or quail). The value of a single turkey egg is estimated to be about $3.50 on the open market, substantially more than an entire carton of one dozen chicken eggs.

Turkeys are traditionally eaten as the main course of Thanksgiving dinner in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas feasts in much of the rest of the world (often as stuffed turkey).

Turkey meat has been eaten by indigenous Peoples from Mexico, Central America and the southern tier of the United States since antiquity. In the 15th century, Spanish Conquistadors took Aztec turkeys back to Europe.

Turkey was eaten as such as early as the 16th century in England. Before the 20th century, pork ribs were the most common food for the North American holidays, as the animals were usually slaughtered in November. Turkeys were once so abundant in the wild that they were eaten throughout the year, the food considered commonplace, whereas pork ribs were rarely available outside of the Thanksgiving-New Year season. While the tradition of turkey at Christmas spread throughout Britain in the 17th century, among the working classes it became common to serve goose, which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.

In the UK in 2009, 7,734,000 turkeys were consumed on Christmas Day.

Turkey with mole sauce is regarded as Mexico’s “national dish”.

Both fresh and frozen turkeys are used for cooking; as with most foods, fresh turkeys are generally preferred, although they cost more. Around holiday seasons, high demand for fresh turkeys

Roast turkey

often makes them difficult to purchase without ordering in advance. For the frozen variety, the large size of the turkeys typically used for consumption makes defrosting them a major endeavor: a typically sized turkey will take several days to properly defrost.

Turkeys are usually baked or roasted in an oven for several hours, often while the cook prepares the remainder of the meal. Sometimes, a turkey is brined before roasting to enhance flavor and moisture content. This is done because the dark meat requires a higher temperature to denature all of the myoglobin pigment than the white meat (very low in myoglobin), so that fully cooking the dark meat tends to dry out the breast. Brining makes it possible to fully cook the dark meat without drying the breast meat. Turkeys are sometimes decorated with turkey frills, paper frills or “booties” that are placed on the end of drumsticks or bones of other cutlets.

In some areas, particularly the American South, they may also be deep-fried in hot oil (often peanut oil) for 30 to 45 minutes by using a turkey fryer. Deep frying turkey has become something of a fad, with hazardous consequences for those unprepared to safely handle the large quantities of hot oil required.

For Thanksgiving in the United States, turkey is typically served stuffed or with dressing (on the side), with cranberry sauce and gravy. Common complementary dishes include mashed potatoes,

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces and sparkling juice. On the left is a log cake

corn on the cob, green beans, squash, and sweet potatoes. Pie is the usual dessert, especially those made from pumpkins, apples, or pecans.

When eaten at Christmas in the United Kingdom, turkey is traditionally served with winter vegetables including roast potatoes, Brussels sprouts and parsnips. Cranberry sauce is the traditional condiment in the northern rural areas of the United Kingdom where wild cranberries grow. In the south and in urban areas, where cranberries until recently were difficult to obtain, bread sauce was used in its place, but the availability of commercial cranberry sauce has seen a rise in its popularity in these areas too. Sometimes sausage meat, cocktail sausages or liver wrapped in bacon is also served (known as bacon rolls or “pigs in blankets”).

Especially during holiday seasons, stuffing, also known as dressing, is traditionally served with turkey. There are many varieties: oatmeal, chestnut, sage and onion (flavored bread), cornbread, and sausage are the most traditional. Stuffing may either be used to stuff the turkey (as the name implies), or may be cooked separately and served as a side dish.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Club Sandwich

November 12, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Club sandwich

Club sandwich

A club sandwich, also called a clubhouse sandwich, is a sandwich of bread (occasionally toasted), sliced cooked poultry, or fried bacon, lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise. It is often cut into quarters or halves and held together by cocktail sticks. Modern versions frequently have two layers which are separated by an additional slice of bread.

The club sandwich may have originated at the Union Club of New York City. The earliest known reference to the sandwich, an article that appeared in The Evening World on November 18, 1889, is also an early recipe; “Have you tried a Union Club sandwich yet? Two toasted pieces of Graham bread, with a layer of turkey or chicken and ham between them, served warm.”Several other early references also credit the chef of the Union Club with creating the sandwich.

Other sources, however, find the origin of the club sandwich to be up for debate. Another theory is that the club sandwich was invented in an exclusive Saratoga Springs, New York, gambling club in the late 19th century.

The sandwich is known to have appeared on U.S. restaurant menus as far back as 1899. The earliest reference to the sandwich in published fiction is from Conversations of a Chorus Girl, a 1903 book by Ray Cardell. Historically, club sandwiches featured slices of chicken, but with time, turkey has become increasingly common.

Club sandwich with tater tots

As with a BLT, toasted white bread is standard, along with iceberg lettuce, bacon, and tomatoes. The sandwich is traditionally dressed with mayonnaise. Variations, however, on the traditional club sandwich abound. Some vary the protein, for example, a “breakfast club” that includes eggs or a “roast beef club.” Others include ham (instead of, or in addition to bacon) and/or cheese slices. Vegetarian club sandwiches often include hummus, avocado or spinach, as well as substitute the real bacon with a vegetarian alternative. Mustard and sometimes honey mustard are common condiments. Upscale variations include, for example, the oyster club, the salmon club, and Dungeness crab melt.

The sandwich is commonly served with an accompaniment of either coleslaw, or potato salad, and often garnished with a pickle. The coleslaw or potato salad is often reduced to a “garnish” portion, when the primary accompaniment is an order of french fries or potato chips. Due to high fat and carb content from the bread, bacon and dressing, club sandwiches have sometimes been criticized as unhealthy. In 2000, Burger King came under fire for its chicken club, which contained 700 calories, 44 grams of fat (nine of them saturated), and 1,300 milligrams of sodium, as well as the trans fat from the fryer shortening.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 30, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Kim J. for passing this hint along……….

For crispy French toast, add a touch of cornstarch to the egg mixture. Didn’t know this one, I’ll give it a try!

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