Kitchen Hints of the Day!

November 16, 2017 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Using Whole Wheat Pasta……….

* Whole-wheat pasta usually requires more cooking time than regular pasta, but don’t overcook it! Whole-wheat pasta quickly loses its texture if overcooked, so follow package directions carefully. Get your kitchen timer out and use it.
* Toss it with pesto or dark, leafy greens like Swiss chard for an earthy, herbal flavor that goes perfectly with whole wheat pasta.
* Make a cold pasta salad with plenty of olive oil and a splash of rice vinegar or squeeze of lemon juice to lighten it up.
* You may eat a little less pasta than you normally would. The whole-wheat and higher- fiber pastas seem to be more satisfying.

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Whole Wheat Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs w/ Baked French Bread

December 17, 2016 at 6:11 PM | Posted in Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Pasta | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Whole Wheat Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs w/ Baked French Bread

 

 
For Breakfast this Saturday morning I prepared some Glier’s Turkey Goetta, been too long since I’ve had Goetta. I whole-wheat-spaghetti-and-turkey-meatballs-003also prepared some Simply Potato Shredded Hash Browns, toasted 2 slices of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread, and had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Love a good Breakfast! Overnight we got some freezing rain but my about 5:00 this morning it started warming up and it was all rain for the rest of the day. You got to love this Ohio weather! The last two days snow and below zero with the wind chill. Today Thunderstorms, rain, and a high in the 50’s! Then Sunday back to 25 degrees and snow flurries. Don’t like the weather here in Ohio,stick around 10 minutes it will change! For Dinner tonight its Whole Wheat Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs w/ Baked French Bread.

 
You just can’t go wrong with Spaghetti and Meatballs! And you can make it healthier by using Whole Wheat Spaghetti and Meatballs 002Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs. I used Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Whole Wheat Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs along with Honeysuckle White Turkey Meatballs. I always use Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Pasta. The Spaghetti is 180 calories and 35 net carbs, which isn’t bad for Pasta. The Honeysuckle White Turkey Meatballs are some of the best I’ve found, fantastic taste and their 190 calories and 6 carbs for 3 Meatballs. For my Pasta Sauce I used Ragu Mushroom Sauce and topped with some Kroger Private Selection Shaved Parmesan Cheese. I also baked a loaf of Pillsbury French Bread.

 

 

Spaghetti and Meatballs 004
To prepare the dish; I cooked the Spaghetti as to the package instructions. In a sauce pan I add my Meatballs and Ragu Sauce, heated on medium low until heated through. In a large bowl I added the finished Spaghetti, the Sauce and Meatballs and mixed and served. Topped the Spaghetti with the Shaved Parmesan Cheese and served it with the baked French Bread. For Dessert later a Breyer’s 100 Calorie Chocolate Ice Cream Cup.

 

 

 

 

 

Honeysuckle White Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs

Product DescriptionHoneysuckle White Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs2
Add traditional Italian taste to your pasta dishes with our Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs. They’re fully cooked and ready to heat and eat.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 3 oz (85.0 g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 190 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 10.0g 15%
Saturated Fat 3.0g 15%
Cholesterol 65mg 22%
Sodium 600mg 25%
Total Carbohydrates 6.0g 2%
Dietary Fiber 0.5g 2%
Sugars 1.0g
Protein 17.0g
http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/ProductDetail.aspx?product_id=1

Jennie – O Turkey Franks

October 11, 2015 at 4:51 PM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Jennie – O Turkey Franks

 

Jennie - O Turkey Franks 005
There was a chill in the air this morning! Went out to get the morning papers and it was a bit chilly, 39 degrees this morning. Started my day off with a toasted Healthy Life Whole Grain English Muffin topped with a scrambled Egg and a Jennie – O Sausage. I made the sausage pattie out of Jennie – O Ground Turkey Breakfast Sausage. For the day I got the leaf blower out and cleaned around the outside deck and driveway, the leaves are all turning and falling now. Then inside did some light house cleaning and it was back to my easy chair! NFL Football and the Baseball Play-Offs for the rest of the afternoon. For dinner tonight it’s Jennie – O Turkey Franks.

 

Jennie - O Turkey Franks 002
I had picked up a couple of packages of Jennie – O Turkey Franks on my last visit to Walmart a while back. I froze one package and having a Turkey Frank for lunch a couple of times so I thought I would have a couple for dinner tonight.

 
To prepare them I used a medium size sauce pan that I filled half way with water. Heated on high for a full boil and added the Turkey Franks. Cooked for five minutes, and done! Love these Turkey Franks, when I can find them in stores. The Franks are nice and plump with that Jennie – O freshness and excellent taste. I served them on a Aunt Millie’s Whole Grain Reduced Calorie Hot Dog Bun and topped with French’s Yellow Mustard. Also had a few Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Chocolate Mousse.

 

 

Jennie – O Turkey Franks
A 100 percent turkey frank with natural smoke flavoring and 40 percent less fat than USDA data for beef franks.

Product Features:
* 40% less fat than USDA data for beef franksJennie - O Turkey Franks
* Gluten Free
* 12-oz package

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 34 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 70 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 45 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 4 g
Saturated Fat 1.5 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 25 mg Iron 2%
Sodium 360 mg Calcium 2%
Ingredients
MECHANICALLY SEPARATED TURKEY, WATER, SALT, CONTAINS 2% OR LESS MODIFIED FOOD STARCH, POTASSIUM LACTATE, SEASONING (CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, DEXTROSE, SUGAR, PAPRIKA, SODIUM ERYTHORBATE, SPICE EXTRACTIVES), SODIUM DIACETATE, NATURAL SMOKE FLAVORING, SODIUM NITRITE. NO GLUTEN.
http://www.jennieo.com/products/72-Turkey-Franks

One of America’s Favorites – Hot Dogs

September 28, 2015 at 5:33 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A hot dog (also spelled hotdog) is a cooked sausage, traditionally grilled or steamed and served in a sliced bun as a

Grilled hot dogs

Grilled hot dogs

sandwich. There are also Hot dog variants that include the corn dog and pigs in blankets. Typical hot dog garnishes include mustard, ketchup, onions, mayonnaise, relish, cheese, chili, and sauerkraut.

The sausages were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United States, where they were a working class street food sold at hot dog stands that came to be associated with baseball and America. Hot dog preparation and condiment styles also vary regionally across the United States. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest and Wienermobile.

 

 

Claims about hot dog invention are difficult to assess, as stories assert the creation of the sausage, the placing of the

A "home-cooked" hot dog

A “home-cooked” hot dog

sausage (or another kind of sausage) on bread or a bun as finger food, the popularization of the existing dish, or the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word frankfurter comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated. These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. Wiener refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef (cf. Hamburger, whose name also derives from a German-speaking city). Johann Georg Lahner, a 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter. Nowadays, in German speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Around 1870, on Coney Island, German immigrant Charles Feltman began selling sausages in rolls.

Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A Bavarian immigrant named Feuchtwanger allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying details. According to one account, Antonoine Feuchtwanger’s wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, United States, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger’s wife suggested serving the food in a roll instead. In another version, Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair–either the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago or the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St Louis–again allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.

The association between hot dogs and baseball began as early as 1893 with Chris von der Ahe, a German immigrant who owned not only the St. Louis Browns, but also an amusement park.

Another claim of inventing the hot dog is told by Harry M. Stevens, an American sports concessionaire whose vendors sold German sausages and rolls to spectators at the old New York Polo Grounds during the winter. He called them “Dachshund sandwiches”, but a New York Post cartoonist “couldn’t spell dachshund, so when he drew the cartoon, he called them hot dogs.”

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer. Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.

 

 

Ingredients:

Common hot dog ingredients include:

* Meat trimmings and fat
* Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika
* Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite
Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Hot dogs often have high sodium, fat and nitrite content, ingredients linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

If a manufacturer produces two types of hot dogs, “wieners” tend to contain pork and are blander, while “franks” tend to be all beef and more strongly seasoned.

 
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Commercial preparation:
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Natural casing hot dogs:
As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters. These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.

Skinless hot dogs:
“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925 by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax”, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home cooking hot dogs:
Hot dogs are prepared and eaten in a variety of ways. The wieners may be boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, or microwaved. The cooked wiener may be served on a bun (usually topped with condiments), or it may be used as an ingredient in another dish. Various models of hot dog toasters exist that cook the hot dog and buns by toasting.

 

 

In the US, “hot dog” may refer to just the sausage or to the combination of a sausage in a bun. Many nicknames for

A Detroit Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

A Detroit Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

hot dogs have popped up over the years. A hot dog can often be seen under the names of frankfurter, frank, red hot, wiener, weenie, durger, coney, or just “dog”.
Hot dog restaurants
Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually. Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.
Condiments
Hot dogs may be served plain, but are commonly served with a variety of condiments, including ketchup, mustard, chile con carne, pickle relish, sauerkraut, onion, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog & Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular condiment, with 32% of respondents preferring it; 23% of Americans said they preferred ketchup; chili con carne came in third at 17%, followed by relish at 9% and onions at 7%. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.

Condiments vary across the country. All-beef Chicago-style hot dogs are topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, sport peppers, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt, but they exclude ketchup.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Italian hot dogs popular in New Jersey include peppers, onions, and potatoes. Meaty Michigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. In New York City, conventional hot dogs are available on Coney Island, as are bagel dogs. Hot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.” Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston and Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The Fenway signature is that the hot dog is boiled and grilled, and then served on a New England-style bun, covered with ketchup and relish. Often during Red Sox games, vendors traverse the stadium selling the hot dogs plain, giving customers the choice of adding the condiments.

 

 

In Canada
Skinner’s Restaurant, in Lockport, Manitoba is reputed to be Canada’s oldest hot dog outlet in continuous operation, founded in 1929, by Jim Skinner Sr. Hotdogs served at Skinners are European style footlongs with natural casings, manufactured by Winnipeg Old Country Sausage in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

The Half Moon Drive In, also in Lockport, Manitoba and located directly across the river from Skinners, was established in 1938 by brothers Peter and Louie Kosowicz. The original drive in consisted of three wooden buildings shaped like semicircles—one was for takeout, one was for dine-in, and the third was a dance hall and later an arcade. The Half Moon also serves European-style wieners manufactured by Winnipeg Old Country Sausage. One of the most popular items is the Moon Dog, consisting of cheese, bacon, fried onions, pickles and mustard, and the Half Moon serves about 2000 on an average summer weekend day.

 

 

Hot dogs outside North America
For a list of international differences in hot dogs, see Hot dog variations.
In most of the world, “hot dog” is recognized as a sausage in a bun, but the type varies considerably. The name is applied to something that would not be described as a hot dog in North America. For example, in New Zealand, it refers to a battered sausage, often on a stick (which is known as a corn dog in North America), and the version in a bun is called an “American hot dog”.

 

 

The world’s longest hot dog created was 197 ft, which rested within a 198 ft bun. The hot dog was prepared by

The world's longest hot dog, at 197 feet

The world’s longest hot dog, at 197 feet

Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.

A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for $69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The “California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18 in all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic & herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

A cooked hot dog on bun with mustard garnish

 

 

Louisiana Seafood Festival

September 2, 2015 at 5:19 AM | Posted in Festivals, fish, seafood | Leave a comment
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Just wanted to pass this along to everyone. Sure wish I lived closer to this! This is one Festival you do not want to miss, the Louisiana Seafood Festival.

 

Celebrate Our Rich Culinary Heritage
From Our Rivers to Our Lakes to Our Shores – and More!

From our waters to your plate, the Louisiana Seafood Festival is a celebration of all the fresh and flavorful seafood that makes our state great.

Our three-day festival offers more and more every year:LOUISIANA FEST

• Three Days of Live Music
• Celebrity Chef Cooking Demonstrations inside a covered pavilion
• Beer Garden featuring a wide selection of craft beers
• A Kid’s Tent featuring fun, seafood-themed activities
• An Arts Village showcasing gifts, décor and more
• Food and Beverages including water, sodas, beer, specialty cocktails and frozen daiquiris
• Free Admission to the festival—bring your friends and family!

The festival is produced by the Louisiana Hospitality Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Proceeds from the festival benefit this important organization.
When: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 4 through Sunday, Sept. 6

Where: City Park Festival Grounds, New Orleans 70124

ADMISSION: Free

INFO: Schedules and details at LouisianaSeafoodFestival.com

http://louisianaseafoodfestival.com/

Pasta Recipes Ready in 30 Minutes or Less

August 30, 2015 at 5:28 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Diabetic Friendly Pasta Recipes Ready in 30 Minutes or Less, from the Diabetic Living Online website. You can find all your Diabetic Friendly Recipes at the Diabetic Living Online website, enjoy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 
Pasta Recipes Ready in 30 Minutes or Less

Lasagna, mac & cheese and more quick pasta dinner recipes.EatingWell2
Pasta cooks up fast, making it a go-to meal for many of us on a busy weeknight. Keep it healthy by choosing whole-wheat pasta—a 2-ounce serving has 4 more grams of fiber than “regular” pasta. Just add fresh vegetables and some lean protein and enjoy a quick and healthy pasta dinner, ready in 30 minutes or less

 

 

Creamy Garlic Pasta with Shrimp & Vegetables
Toss a garlicky, Middle Eastern-inspired yogurt sauce with pasta, shrimp, asparagus, peas and red bell pepper for a fresh, satisfying summer meal. Serve with: Slices of cucumber and tomato tossed with lemon juice and olive oil…..

 

 

Chicken & Sun-Dried Tomato Orzo
Sun-dried tomatoes and Romano cheese pack a flavorful punch along with the tantalizing aroma of fresh marjoram in this rustic Italian-inspired dish. Serve with sautéed fresh spinach or steamed broccolini….

 

 

Fresh Pomodoro Pasta, White Beans & Olives
Capture the flavor of vine-ripe tomatoes with this elegant yet ultra-quick fresh tomato sauce. Although it’s an uncooked sauce, the beans are heated briefly in the olive oil and garlic just to flavor them….

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Pasta Recipes Ready in 30 Minutes or Less

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/pasta_recipes_ready_in_30_minutes_or_less

One of America’s Favorites – Corn on the Cob

July 27, 2015 at 5:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 3 Comments
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Cooked corn on the cob with serving sticks

Cooked corn on the cob with serving sticks

Corn on the cob (known regionally as “pole corn”, “cornstick”, “sweet pole”, “butter-pop” or “long maize”) is a culinary term used for a cooked ear of freshly picked maize from a cultivar of sweet corn. Sweet corn is the most common variety of maize eaten directly off the cob. The ear is picked while the endosperm is in the “milk stage” so that the kernels are still tender. Ears of corn are steamed or boiled, usually without their green husks, or roasted with them. The husk leaves are in any case removed before serving.

Corn on the cob is normally eaten while still warm. It is boiled or grilled. It is then often seasoned with salt and buttered before serving. Some diners use specialized skewers, thrust into the ends of the cob, to hold the ear while eating without touching the hot and sticky kernels.

 

 

Cooking corn on the cob by boiling

Cooking corn on the cob by boiling

The most common methods for cooking corn on the cob are frying, boiling, roasting, and grilling. Corn on the cob can be grilled directly in its husk, or it can be husked first and then wrapped in aluminum foil. When oven roasting, cooking the corn in the husk directly on the rack is recommended. When roasting or grilling corn on the cob, the cook can first peel the husk back to rub the corn with oil or melted butter, then re-secure the husk around the corn with a string.

Common condiments and seasonings for corn on the cob include butter, salt, and black pepper.

 

 

Lillian Eichler Watson, in a 1921 etiquette book, described corn on the cob as “without a doubt one of the most difficult foods to eat gracefully.” She added that “it is entirely permissible to use the fingers in eating corn, holding it lightly at each end; sometimes a napkin is used in holding it.” Sometimes, however, a short sharp knife would be provided that each diner could use to cut or scrape the kernels from the cob for later eating. She described this as “by far the most satisfactory method” of eating corn on the cob.

Some etiquette books recommend salting and buttering the corn a section at a time just before eating that section, which helps to minimize the mess on the diner’s face and hands. Butter dripping down the diner’s chin and kernels getting stuck in-between teeth may be a source of embarrassment for the diner.

 

 

Skewers for eating corn on the cob

Skewers for eating corn on the cob

Corn skewers (also called corncob holders) are eating utensils used to hold corn on the cob.

A number of inventive designs can be found through Google. Skewers have been used since ancient times, ranging from articles made of wood found in ethnographic museums to precious tableware made of silver.

 

 

 

Corn was eaten by Native American tribes before European settlers arrived in the Americas. The Maya ate corn as a staple food crop and ate it off the cob, either roasting or boiling it.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 17, 2015 at 4:55 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Eggs are an excellent source of protein and contain nutrients such as vitamin D and choline. You can hard-boil a few on the weekend to have as an easy breakfast, snack or quick salad addition.

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

July 6, 2015 at 4:58 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Remember these tips if boiling foods………

 
* Bring water to boiling point, then add vegetables. A lot of vitamin content is lost and dissolved out when vegetables are added to water and then brought to boiling stage.

* Save the cooking water, which contains minerals and vitamins, and use to flavor soups, gravies or for part of the liquid to mash potatoes.

* Wait for the water to come to a rapid, extravagant boil, then add the pasta. When pasta sits in water that’s not hot enough it get gummy and sticky.

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

June 29, 2015 at 5:23 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , ,

Pasta Hints……

 
* When the water starts boiling, lower the flame so that the bubbles are small. A big, rolling boil will break more delicate pasta such as ravioli or tortellini.

* Stirring pasta during cooking is crucial! Skip this step and you’re left with a giant clump of noodles that are stuck together.

* Covering the pot of cold water with a lid will help bring the water to a boil faster.

* Pasta shouldn’t stick when properly cooked. If it’s cooked with olive oil, it will actually coat the noodles and prevent sauce from sticking

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