50 Ways To Eat Eggs

March 27, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its 50 Ways To Eat Eggs. Here are some Eggceptional and Healthy Egg Recipes with recipes like; Homemade Chicken Ramen Noodle Bowls, Soft Eggs with Green Goddess Dressing and Brown-Butter Breadcrumbs, and Cheesy Egg Stuffed Peppers. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

50 Ways To Eat Eggs
Eggs are one of the most nutritious (and cheapest!) foods on the planet—one 80-calorie egg provides six grams of filling protein, five grams of heart-healthy fats, vitamin D, plus lutein and zeaxanthin, two antioxidants that help keep your eyes healthy. Here are 50 delicious recipes featuring this eggceptional superfood, from egg-in-a-hole avocado toast to cozy homemade ramen.

Homemade Chicken Ramen Noodle Bowls
Transform canned chicken noodle soup into quick ramen bowls by adding fresh ginger, crunchy vegetables, herbs and a jammy soft-boiled egg. Look for a low-sodium soup that has 450 mg sodium or less per serving…………….

Soft Eggs with Green Goddess Dressing and Brown-Butter Breadcrumbs
For this showstopper of an appetizer, the custardy yolks of soft-cooked eggs are magically balanced with an amazing green goddess dressing and a crunchy brown-butter breadcrumb topping…………..

Cheesy Egg Stuffed Peppers
Bake up omelets in a pepper for a healthy, veggie-packed breakfast. Sweet bell peppers are filled with a cheesy egg filling with all the fixings of a classic Denver omelet. If you’re cooking for a crowd, this recipe is easy to double!……….

* Click the link below to get the 50 Ways To Eat Eggs
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/23214/ingredients/eggs/50/slideshow/50-ways-to-eat-eggs/

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Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 22, 2018 at 6:26 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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No cracks here……

Add a pinch of salt when boiling eggs, this keeps them from cracking while cooking.

Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes

July 14, 2017 at 5:31 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes. Protein packed and Diabetic Friendly Egg Breakfast recipes to start your day off right. Recipes include; Ranch Eggs, Southwestern Breakfast Tostadas, and Green Eggs and Ham Breakfast Burritos. Find these and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes

Packed with protein, eggs are a great way to start your day. Try one of these diabetes-friendly egg recipes that are carb-smart and delicious.

 

Ranch Eggs

Your taste buds will get a wake-up call with this Mexican-style casserole. If hot and spicy doesn’t suit you in the morning, serve this meatless main dish for supper……

 

Southwestern Breakfast Tostadas

Take a trip to the Southwest without leaving your breakfast table with these crispy-outside, chewy-inside tostadas. Add your favorite veggies for even more flavor……

 

Green Eggs and Ham Breakfast Burritos

Zucchini, jalapeno, avocado, and salsa verde team up to give this egg breakfast its Seuss-inspired green hue. Fold the egg-and-veggie mixture into whole wheat, low-carb flour tortillas for a protein-rich breakfast that has just 24 grams of carb per serving……..

 

* Click the link below to get al the Diabetic Egg Breakfast Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/breakfast/diabetic-egg-breakfast-recipes

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 14, 2016 at 4:53 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 1 Comment
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One way to peel hard-boiled eggs is to crack the eggs slightly on the counter then place them in a bowl of cool water. The water will seep in and loosen the egg from the shell, making sure you don’t accidentally take off half the white when you’re trying to peel it.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 15, 2015 at 6:39 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Cook Cyndi for passing this hint along….

 

When boiling a cracked egg, a teaspoon of salt or a little vinegar should stop it from leaking.

One of America’s Favorites – Deviled Egg

September 14, 2015 at 5:01 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate of deviled eggs

A plate of deviled eggs

Deviled eggs (US) or devilled eggs (UK) are hard-boiled eggs, shelled, cut in half, and filled with the hard-boiled egg’s yolk mixed with other ingredients such as mayonnaise and mustard, but many other variants exist internationally. Deviled eggs are usually served cold. They are served as a side dish, appetizer or a main course, and are a common holiday or party food.

 

 

The term “deviled”, in reference to food, was in use in the 18th century, with the first known print reference appearing in 1786. In the 19th century, it came to be used most often with spicy or zesty food, including eggs prepared with mustard, pepper or other ingredients stuffed in the yolk cavity.

In parts of the Southern and Midwestern United States, the terms “stuffed eggs”, “salad eggs”, “dressed eggs”, or “angel eggs” are also used, particularly when served in connection with church functions, avoiding the name “Devil.” The term “angel eggs” is also used in association with deviled eggs stuffed with “healthier” alternatives.

 

 

Cool hard-boiled eggs are peeled and halved lengthwise, and the yolks are removed. The yolks are then mashed and mixed with a variety of other ingredients, such as mayonnaise and mustard. Tartar sauce or Worcestershire sauce are also frequently used. Other common flavorings include: diced pickle or pickle relish, salt, ground black pepper, powdered cayenne pepper or chipotle chillies, turmeric, vinegar, green olives, pimentos, poppyseed, thyme, cilantro, minced onion, pickle brine, caviar, cream, capers, and sour cream. The yolk mixture is then scooped with a spoon and piped back into each egg “cup”. Old Bay, paprika, curry powder, cayenne, chives, and dill may then be sprinkled on top as a garnish. It may be further decorated with dollops of caviar, anchovy, bacon, shrimp or herring.

 

 

Contemporary versions of deviled eggs tend to include a wider range of seasonings and added foods, such as garlic, horseradish, wasabi, sliced jalapeños, cheese, chutney, capers, salsa, hot sauce, ham, mushrooms, spinach, sour cream, caviar, shrimp, smoked salmon or other seafood, and sardines.

 

Deviled egg plate

Deviled egg plate

The deviled egg can be seen in recipes as far back as ancient Rome, where they were traditionally served as a first course. It is still popular across the continent of Europe. In France it is called œuf mimosa; in Hungary, töltött tojás (“stuffed egg”) or kaszinótojás (“casino egg”); in Romania, ouă umplute (“stuffed eggs”); in the Netherlands gevuld ei (“stuffed egg”); in Sweden fyllda ägg (“stuffed eggs”); in Malta it is called bajd mimli (“stuffed eggs”). In many European countries, especially Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Germany, a variation is served known as “Russian eggs”. This consists of eggs cut in half, served with vegetable macédoine and garnished with mayonnaise, parsley and tomato. Contrary to what the name might suggest, the dish does not originate in Russia: its name derives from the fact that the eggs are served on a bed of macédoine, which is sometimes called Russian salad. In the Black Forest region of Germany, Russian eggs may be garnished with caviar. In Sweden, the deviled egg is a traditional dish on the Easter Smörgåsbord, where the yolk is mixed with caviar, cream or sour cream, optionally chopped red onion, and decorated with chopped chives or dill, perhaps with a piece of anchovy or pickled herring. Deviled eggs are a common dish in the United States. In the Midwestern and Southern U.S., they are commonly served as hors d’oeuvres before a full meal is served, often during the summer months. Deviled eggs are so popular in the United States that special carrying trays are sold for them. Prepared and packaged deviled eggs are now available in some U.S. supermarkets.

In French cuisine, the other ingredients are most likely to be pepper and parsley. In Hungarian cuisine the yolks are mashed and mixed with white bread soaked in milk, mustard and parsley, often served as an appetizer in mayonnaise or as a main course baked in the oven with Hungarian sour cream topping and served with French fries. Other common flavorings of the yolks in the German cuisine are anchovy, cheese and caper.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 14, 2015 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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If boiling Eggs…..
Do not add salt to water. The salt will raise the boiling point of the water making the egg whites rubbery.

One of America’s Favorites – Boiled Eggs

August 24, 2015 at 5:03 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Boiled eggs

Boiled eggs

Boiled eggs are eggs (typically chicken eggs) cooked by immersion in boiling water with their shells unbroken. (Eggs cooked in water without their shells are known as poached eggs, while eggs cooked below the boiling temperature, either with or without the shell, are known as coddled eggs.) Hard-boiled eggs are either boiled long enough for the egg white and then the egg yolk to solidify, or they are left in hot water to cool down, which will gradually solidify them, while a soft-boiled egg yolk, and sometimes even the white, remains at least partially liquid.

The egg timer was so-named due to its common usage in timing the boiling of eggs. Boiled eggs are a popular breakfast food in many countries around the world.

 

 

There are variations both in desired doneness and in the method of how eggs are boiled, and a variety of kitchen gadgets for eggs exist. These variations include:

Baked eggs
Baking eggs in an oven instead of boiling in water. Baked eggs (350 °F (177 °C) for 1/2 hour in a muffin tin, cool in ice water) are identical to boiled eggs but the shells peel easier.
Starting temperature
Room temperature (for more even cooking and to prevent cracking) or from a refrigerator; eggs may be left out overnight to come to room temperature.
Preparation
Some pierce the eggs beforehand with an egg piercer to prevent cracking. There is much debate on this subject. Ekelund et al. in Why eggs should not be pierced claimed that pricking caused egg white proteins to be damaged and was therefore to be discouraged. Others recommend against this,[note 1] or add vinegar to the water (as is sometimes done with poached eggs) to prevent the white from billowing in case of cracking. For this purpose, table salt can also be used.
Placing in water
There are various ways to place the eggs in the boiling water and removing: one may place the eggs in the pan prior to heating, lower them in on a spoon, or use a specialized cradle to lower them in. A cradle is also advocated as reducing cracking, since the eggs do not then roll around loose. To remove, one may allow the water to cool, pour off the boiling water, or remove the cradle.
Steaming
Eggs are taken straight from the refrigerator and placed in the steamer at full steam. The eggs will not crack due to sudden change in temperatures. At full steam, “soft-boiled” eggs are ready in 6 minutes, “hard-boiled” eggs at 8 minutes. As the eggs are cooked by a steam source, there is no variation of water temperature and hence cooking time, no matter how many eggs are placed in the steamer.
Cooking time
There is substantial variation, with cooking time being the primary variable affecting doneness (soft-boiled vs. hard-boiled). It usually varies from 15–17 minutes for large hard-boiled eggs, 1–4 minutes for large soft-cooked eggs and 12 minutes for the best results. Depending on altitude above sea level and humidity densities in a given climate, one may require extended amounts of time to reach the soft-boiled stage, and in fact, may never reach a fully hard stage.
Cooking temperature
In addition to cooking at a rolling boil (at 100 °C (212 °F)), one may instead add the egg before a boil is reached, remove water from heat after a boil is reached, or attempt to maintain a temperature below boiling, the latter all variants of coddling.
Cooling
After eggs are removed from heat, some cooking continues to occur, particularly of the yolk, due to residual heat, a phenomenon called carry over cooking, also seen in roast meat. For this reason some allow eggs to cool in air or plunge them into cold water as the final stage of preparation. If time is limited, adding a few cubes of ice will quickly reduce the temperature for easy handling.
Service

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

Boiled eggs may be served loose, in an eggcup, in an indentation in a plate (particularly a presentation platter of deviled eggs), cut with a knife widthwise, cut lengthwise, cut with a knife or tapped open with a spoon at either end, or peeled (and optionally sliced, particularly if hard-boiled, either manually or with an egg slicer).

 

 

The Blumenthal method
Chef Heston Blumenthal, after “relentless trials”, published a formula for “the perfect boiled egg” that explains how much water to use, how much time to cook and how much time to rest the egg.

Soft-boiled eggs are not recommended for people who may be susceptible to salmonella, such as very young children, the elderly, and those with weakened immune systems. To avoid the issue of salmonella, eggs can be pasteurised in shell at 57C for an hour and 15 minutes. The eggs can then be soft-boiled as normal.

Serving
Soft-boiled eggs are commonly served in egg cups, where the top of the egg is cut off with a knife, spoon, spring-loaded egg topper, or egg scissors, using a teaspoon to scoop the egg out. Other methods include breaking the eggshell by tapping gently around the top of the shell with a spoon. Soft-boiled eggs can be eaten with toast cut into strips, which are then dipped into the runny yolk. In the United Kingdom and Australia, these strips of toast are known as “soldiers”.

In Southeast Asia, especially countries like Malaysia, Singapore and the Philippines, a variation of soft-boiled eggs known as half-boiled eggs are commonly eaten at breakfast. The major difference is that, instead of the egg being served in an egg cup, it is cracked into a bowl to which dark or light soy sauce and/or pepper are added. The egg is also cooked for a shorter period of time resulting in a runnier egg instead of the usual gelatin state and is commonly eaten with Kaya toast.

Boiled eggs are also an ingredient in various Philippine dishes, such as embutido, pancit, relleno, galantina, and many others.

In Japan, soft-boiled eggs are commonly served alongside ramen. The eggs are typically steeped in a mixture of soy sauce, mirin, and water after being boiled and peeled. This provides the egg a brownish color that would otherwise be absent from boiling and peeling the eggs alone. Once the eggs have finished steeping, they are served either in the soup or on the side.

 

 

Hard-boiled eggs are boiled for longer than soft-boiled eggs, long enough for the yolk to solidify. They can be eaten warm or cold. Hard-boiled eggs are the basis for many dishes, such as egg salad, Cobb salad and Scotch eggs, and may be further prepared as deviled eggs.

Hard-boiled eggs are commonly sliced, particularly for use in sandwiches. For this purpose specialized egg slicers exist, to ease slicing and yield even slices.

There are several theories as to the proper technique of hard-boiling an egg. One method is to bring water to a boil and cook for ten minutes. Another method is to bring the water to a boil, but then remove the pan from the heat and allow eggs to cook in the gradually cooling water. Over-cooking eggs will typically result in a thin green iron(II) sulfide coating on the yolk. This reaction occurs more rapidly in older eggs as the whites are more alkaline. Immersing the egg in cold water after boiling is a common method of halting the cooking process to prevent this effect. It also causes a slight shrinking of the contents of the egg.

Hard-boiled eggs should be used within two hours if kept at room temperature or can be used for a week if kept refrigerated and in the shell.

 

 

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

A boiled egg, presented in an eggcup

Hard-boiled eggs can vary widely in how easy it is to peel away the shells. In general, the fresher an egg before boiling, the more difficult it is to separate the shell cleanly from the egg white. As a fresh egg ages, it gradually loses both moisture and carbon dioxide through pores in the shell; as a consequence, the contents of the egg shrink and the pH of the albumen becomes more basic. Albumen with higher pH (more basic) is less likely to stick to the egg shell, while pockets of air develop in eggs that have lost significant amounts of moisture, also making eggs easier to peel. Adding baking soda to the boiling water can help make it easier to peel the eggs. Keeping the cooked eggs soaked in water helps keep the membrane under the egg shell moisturized for easy peeling. Peeling the egg under running water is another effective method of removing the shell. Starting the cooking in hot water also makes the egg easier to peel. Another method: after plunging the eggs in cold water when they’re done, place them back in the hot water they were boiled in for 20 seconds, then return them to the cold water. The theory is that the shells expand and contract, loosening their bond.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 16, 2015 at 5:03 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Boiled Eggs Storage – Having peeled the eggs, you can store them in a refrigerator for up to five days. For a fresh storage tip, let the eggs soak in an inch or two of cold water they’ll keep for five days.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 22, 2015 at 5:33 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Today’s Kitchen Hint comes from http://whatscookingamerica.net/

 

Eggactly…..

 

Refrigeration is necessary for hard boiled eggs if the eggs are not to be consumed within a few hours.

White, speckled (red), and brown chicken eggs

White, speckled (red), and brown chicken eggs

It is preferable not to peel your eggs until you are ready to eat or use in your recipe. Hard-cooked eggs in the shell can be refrigerated up to one week. Peeled hard boiled eggs can be stored in the refrigerator in a bowl of cold water to cover for about 1 week (change the water daily) – or in a sealed container without water (cover the eggs with damp paper towels) for the same length of time.

 

SAFETY NOTE: It is not safe to leave hard boiled eggs (including those in their shells) out at room temperature for long. If they have been taken to a picnic, or served on a buffet, keep them cool while they are being served, and discard any leftovers.

 

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Q-A/eggs2.htm

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