Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week -BUFFALO PRIME RIB ROAST

December 5, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is -BUFFALO PRIME RIB ROAST. Ti’s the season for Prime Rib! You’ll be using the Wild Idea Buffalo Prime Rib Roast. Salt, black pepper, paprika, cumin, cardamom, chili powder, thyme, garlic powder, onion powder, and espresso to strengthen flavor make up this incredible rub for the Roast. You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Prime Rib Roast along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy through the Holiday Season! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

BUFFALO PRIME RIB ROAST
Note: This recipe is based on an 8 lb. roast, adjust cooking time to pounds. Spices in the rub can be substituted or adjusted to your liking. This rub is excellent on all roasts. Modify spices per pounds.

Ingredients:

1 Buffalo Prime Rib Roast, rinsed and patted dry
1 Tb. salt
1 Tb. coarse black pepper
2 Tb. sugar
1 tsp. each: paprika, cumin, cardamom, chili powder, thyme,
garlic powder, and onion powder
2 Tb. espresso, (reduce espresso to strengthen flavor)
2 Tb. olive oil
2 stalks celery, quartered
1 onion, quartered
2 cups buffalo or organic beef stock (broth)
½ cup dry sherry

1 – Mix all dry spices together. Add espresso and oil, creating a paste.
2 – Rub seasoning paste into roast. Cover and leave at room temperature for 2 hours.
3 – Preheat oven to 450* Insert meat thermometer in center of roast, avoiding the bone.
4 – Place celery & onion on bottom of heavy roasting pan. Place roast bone side up on top of vegetable bed.
5 – Roast for 15 minutes.
6 – Add ½ cup stock to the bottom of pan and reduce oven temperature to 350°.
7 – Continue roasting, calculating 10 minutes per pound, adding remaining stock to pan as needed throughout roasting. (Approximately 1 hour and 20 minutes for an 8 lb. roast or until the internal meat thermometer reaches 110*. Rely on your internal meat thermometer.)
8 – Shut oven off and leave roast in oven for 30 minutes or until internal meat thermometer reaches 125*.
9 – Transfer meat to a large platter and tent with foil to keep heat in. Meat thermometer should red 135* for medium rare.
10 – Place roasting pan on stove top over medium high heat, scraping the bottom to
11 – Loosen vegetables. Add any remaining stock and sherry and bring to a simmer.
12 – Slice roast into desired thickness, and add juices from roast to au jus.
13 – Season au jus to taste with salt, pepper and red wine. Strain.
14 – Serve roast with au jus and pass with horseradish cream sauce.
Or, you might also want to try the Cranberry Port Sauce for the holidays?

Cranberry Port Sauce

Ingredients:

1 Tb. butter
½ cup red onion, finely diced
1 Tb. garlic, minced
1 tsp. thyme
½ tsp. salt
1 Tb. black pepper
1 cup port +
1 can cranberry sauce
1 – In saucepan over medium high heat melt butter.
2 – Add onion, garlic and seasonings. Sauté for 7 minutes.
3 – Deglaze pan with port.
4 – Add cranberry sauce and stir in to incorporate.
Bring to simmer. Taste to adjust seasonings. If sauce becomes too thick, add additional port as needed. Drizzle over sliced Buffalo Roast.

*As another option, you can add 2 Tb. roasted and diced greens chilies.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/buffalo-prime-rib-roast

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Diabetic Dish of the Week – HOLIDAY APPETIZER MEATBALLS

November 20, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – HOLIDAY APPETIZER MEATBALLS. Easily made and ready for your freezer. Made using Lean Ground Pork. Serve with choice of dipping sauces; Toasted Onion Dip, Ginger-Orange Dip, and Barbecue-Cranberry Dip. 200 calories and 1 carb per serving (7 meatballs). The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. At the Diabetic Gourmet site you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly recipes for all occasions. Enjoy and Eat Healthy through the Holidays! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

HOLIDAY APPETIZER MEATBALLS
These meatballs are convenient to have on hand, in the freezer. Serve for snacks with dipping sauces. They’re great for making grinder sandwiches, too. Serve one or more of these dips with the meatballs: Toasted Onion Dip, Ginger-Orange Dip and Barbecue-Cranberry Dip.

Yield: Yield: 7 dozen meatballs.
Serving size: 7 meatballs.

Ingredients

2 pounds lean ground pork
1 cup ice water
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1 – Heat oven to 375 degrees F.
2 – With hands or wooden spoon mix pork, water, soy sauce and pepper thoroughly in large bowl.
3 – Shape into 3/4-inch balls (mixture will be fairly soft and balls will not be perfect).
4 – Arrange closely together in single layer on ungreased shallow baking pan, like a jelly-roll pan.
5 – Bake for 20-30 minutes.
6 – Remove from pan, and serve immediately with a dipping sauce, like your favorite salad dressings or choose from the suggestions below.
7 – Use toothpicks to skewer meatballs to dip. Or remove from pan, cool, cover and freeze or refrigerate. Serve cold or reheated.

Nutrition information Per Serving:
Calories: 200
Protein: 13 g
Fat: 16 g
Sodium: 390 mg
Cholesterol: 55 mg
Carbohydrates: 1 g
https://diabeticgourmet.com/articles/meatball-appetizer-recipes-that-are-low-carb-and-diabetic-friendly/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 9, 2018 at 6:25 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Pass the Black Pepper please…….

 

Health Benifits of Black Pepper……Improves Digestion. Consumption of pepper increases the hydrochloric acid secretion in the stomach, thereby facilitating digestion.
* Weight Loss.
* Skin Care.
* Provides Respiratory Relief.
* Antibacterial Quality.
* Antioxidant Potential.
* Enhances Bioavailability.
* Improves Cognitive Function.
* 79% of the daily recommended value of the manganese; 57% of the vitamin K; 45% of the iron, and 30% of the fiber. I

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Pastrami “Reuben” Sandwich

April 27, 2016 at 5:07 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 2 Comments
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Pastrami “Reuben” Sandwich. You can find the recipe and order the Buffalo Pastrami all on the Wild Idea Buffalo website, Enjoy! http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 
Buffalo Pastrami “Reuben” Sandwich
The O’Brien household’s version of this pub favorite. So good, it will become a weekly request!

Ingredients:

1 package Buffalo Pastrami
1 ½ cup “Bubbies” Sauerkraut (it’s really, really good)Buffalo Pastrami Reuben Sandwich
4 ounces Irish Cheddar Cheese
6 slices Pumpernickel Bread
1 tablespoon Butter
*Reuben Sauce
Preparation:
1 – On flat top griddle or in a large sauté pan over medium heat place Buffalo Pastrami in lightly oiled pan to heat through. Turn while heating.
2 – Arrange Buffalo Pastrami in 4 equal piles and top with cheese. Add sauerkraut to the pan too. Cover and heat until cheese is melted, and sauerkraut is warm.
3 – Remove from pan and cover to keep warm.
4 – Spread butter on one side of the bread and grill bread until golden brown.
5 – Stack meat, cheese and kraut on inside of grilled bread and spread the other slice with *Reuben sauce (recipe below), and sandwich together.
Serve with Potato, Leek Soup.

 

 

Ingredients:
*Reuben Sauce
1/2 cup MayonnaiseWild Idea
¼ cup Salsa
¼ cup Roasted and Peeled Red Peppers
Salt
Pepper

Preparation:
1 – Place all ingredients in food processor and puree.
2 – Season with slat & pepper to taste.

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/buffalo-pastrami-reuben-sandwich/

Pepper of the Week – Black Pepper

October 1, 2015 at 5:19 AM | Posted in Pepper of the Week | 1 Comment
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Pepper plant with immature peppercorns

Pepper plant with immature peppercorns

After going through the types of Apples list, it’s on to Peppers! Each week I’ll feature a different type of Pepper, through Wiki and various other sites for info. Starting off with Black Pepper. Spice it up!

 

 

Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. When dried, the fruit is known as a peppercorn. When fresh and fully mature, it is approximately 5 millimetres (0.20 in) in diameter, dark red, and, like all drupes, contains a single seed. Peppercorns, and the ground pepper derived from them, may be described simply as pepper, or more precisely as black pepper (cooked and dried unripe fruit), green pepper (dried unripe fruit) and white pepper (ripe fruit seeds).

Black pepper is native to south India, and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions. Currently Vietnam is the world’s largest producer and exporter of pepper and producing 34% of the world’s Piper nigrum crop as of 2008.

Dried ground pepper has been used since antiquity for both its flavor and as a traditional medicine. Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice. It is one of the most common spices added to European cuisine and its descendants. The spiciness of black pepper is due to the chemical piperine, not to be confused with the capsaicin that gives fleshy peppers theirs. It is ubiquitous in the modern world as a seasoning and is often paired with salt.

 

The six variants of pepper

The six variants of pepper

Varieties

Black pepper
Black pepper is produced from the still-green, unripe drupes of the pepper plant. The drupes are cooked briefly in hot water, both to clean them and to prepare them for drying. The heat ruptures cell walls in the pepper, speeding the work of browning enzymes during drying. The drupes are dried in the sun or by machine for several days, during which the pepper around the seed shrinks and darkens into a thin, wrinkled black layer. Once dried, the spice is called black peppercorn. On some estates, the berries are separated from the stem by hand and then sun-dried without the boiling process.

Once the peppercorns are dried, pepper spirit and oil can be extracted from the berries by crushing them. Pepper spirit is used in many medicinal and beauty products. Pepper oil is also used as an ayurvedic massage oil and used in certain beauty and herbal treatments.

White pepper
“White pepper” redirects here. For the Ween album, see White Pepper.

White pepper grains
White pepper consists of the seed of the pepper plant alone, with the darker-colored skin of the pepper fruit removed. This is usually accomplished by a process known as retting, where fully ripe red pepper berries are soaked in water for about a week, during which the flesh of the pepper softens and decomposes. Rubbing then removes what remains of the fruit, and the naked seed is dried. Sometimes alternative processes are used for removing the outer pepper from the seed, including removing the outer layer through mechanical, chemical or biological methods.

Ground white pepper is often used in cream sauces, Chinese and Thai cuisine, and dishes like salad, light-colored sauces and mashed potatoes, where black pepper would visibly stand out. White pepper has a slightly different flavor from black pepper, due to the lack of certain compounds present in the outer fruit layer of the drupe, but not found in the seed. A slightly sweet version of white pepper from India is sometimes called safed golmirch (Hindi), shada golmorich (Bengali), or safed golmirch.

Green pepper
Green pepper, like black, is made from the unripe drupes. Dried green peppercorns are treated in a way that retains the green color, such as treatment with sulphur dioxide, canning or freeze-drying. Pickled peppercorns, also green, are unripe drupes preserved in brine or vinegar. Fresh, unpreserved green pepper drupes, largely unknown in the West, are used in some Asian cuisines, particularly Thai cuisine. Their flavor has been described as spicy and fresh, with a bright aroma. They decay quickly if not dried or preserved.

Wild pepper
Wild pepper grows in the Western Ghats region of India. Into the 19th century, the forests contained expansive wild pepper vines, as recorded by the Scottish physician Francis Buchanan (also a botanist and geographer) in his book A journey from Madras through the countries of Mysore, Canara and Malabar (Volume III). However, deforestation resulted in wild pepper growing in more limited forest patches from Goa to Kerala, with the wild source gradually decreasing as the quality and yield of the cultivated variety improved. No successful grafting of commercial pepper on wild pepper has been achieved to date.

Orange pepper and red pepper
Orange pepper or red pepper usually consists of ripe red pepper drupes preserved in brine and vinegar. Ripe red peppercorns can also be dried using the same color-preserving techniques used to produce green pepper.

Pink pepper and other plants used as pepper
Pink pepper from Piper nigrum is distinct from the more-common dried “pink peppercorns”, which are actually the fruits of a plant from a different family, the Peruvian pepper tree, Schinus molle, or its relative the Brazilian pepper tree, Schinus terebinthifolius. A pink peppercorn (French: baie rose, “pink berry”) is a dried berry of the shrub Schinus molle, commonly known as the Peruvian peppertree. As they are members of the cashew family, they may cause allergic reactions including anaphylaxis for persons with a tree nut allergy.

The bark of Drimys winteri (“Canelo” or “Winter’s Bark”) is used as a substitute for pepper in cold and temperate regions of Chile and Argentina where it is easily available.

In New Zealand the seeds of Kawakawa (Macropiper excelsum), a relative of black pepper, are sometimes used as pepper and the leaves of Pseudowintera colorata (mountain horopito) are another replacement for pepper.

Several plants in the United States are used also as pepper substitutes, such as Lepidium campestre, Lepidium virginicum, shepherd’s purse, horseradish, and field Pennycress.

 

Black and white peppercorns

Black and white peppercorns

Pepper is native to South Asia and Southeast Asia and has been known to Indian cooking since at least 2000 BCE. J. Innes Miller notes that while pepper was grown in southern Thailand and in Malaysia, its most important source was India, particularly the Malabar Coast, in what is now the state of Kerala Peppercorns were a much-prized trade good, often referred to as “black gold” and used as a form of commodity money. The legacy of this trade remains in some Western legal systems which recognize the term “peppercorn rent” as a form of a token payment made for something that is in fact being given.

The ancient history of black pepper is often interlinked with (and confused with) that of long pepper, the dried fruit of closely related Piper longum. The Romans knew of both and often referred to either as just “piper”. In fact, it was not until the discovery of the New World and of chili peppers that the popularity of long pepper entirely declined. Chili peppers, some of which when dried are similar in shape and taste to long pepper, were easier to grow in a variety of locations more convenient to Europe.

Before the 16th century, pepper was being grown in Java, Sunda, Sumatra, Madagascar, Malaysia, and everywhere in Southeast Asia. These areas traded mainly with China, or used the pepper locally. Ports in the Malabar area also served as a stop-off point for much of the trade in other spices from farther east in the Indian Ocean. Following the British hegemony in India, virtually all of the black pepper found in Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa was traded from Malabar region.

 

Black pepper grains

Black pepper grains

Pepper gets its spicy heat mostly from piperine derived both from the outer fruit and the seed. Black pepper contains between 4.6% and 9.7% piperine by mass, and white pepper slightly more than that. Refined piperine, by weight, is about one percent as hot as the capsaicin found in chili peppers. The outer fruit layer, left on black pepper, also contains important odor-contributing terpenes including pinene, sabinene, limonene, caryophyllene, and linalool, which give citrusy, woody, and floral notes. These scents are mostly missing in white pepper, which is stripped of the fruit layer. White pepper can gain some different odours (including musty notes) from its longer fermentation stage. The aroma of pepper is attributed to rotundone (3,4,5,6,7,8-Hexahydro-3α,8α-dimethyl-5α-(1-methylethenyl)azulene-1(2H)-one), a sesquiterpene originally discovered in the tubers of cyperus rotundus, which can be detected in concentrations of 0.4 nanograms/L in water and in wine: rotundone is also present in marjoram, oregano, rosemary, basil, thyme, and geranium, as well as in some Shiraz wines.

 

Herb and Spice of the Week – Pepper

March 5, 2015 at 6:33 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
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Black and white peppercorns

Black and white peppercorns

Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. The fruit, known as a peppercorn when dried, is approximately 5 millimetres (0.20 in) in diameter, dark red when fully mature, and, like all drupes, contains a single seed. Peppercorns, and the ground pepper derived from them, may be described simply as pepper, or more precisely as black pepper (cooked and dried unripe fruit), green pepper (dried unripe fruit) and white pepper (ripe fruit seeds).

 

 

Black pepper is native to south India, and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions. Currently Vietnam is the world’s largest producer and exporter of pepper, producing 34% of the world’s Piper nigrum crop as of 2008.

Dried ground pepper has been used since antiquity for both its flavour and as a traditional medicine. Black pepper is the world’s most traded spice. It is one of the most common spices added to European cuisine and its descendants. The spiciness of black pepper is due to the chemical piperine, not to be confused with the capsaicin that gives fleshy peppers theirs. It is ubiquitous in the modern world as a seasoning, and is often paired with salt.

 

The 6 variants of Pepper

The 6 variants of Pepper

Black pepper
Black pepper is produced from the still-green unripe drupes of the pepper plant. The drupes are cooked briefly in hot water, both to clean them and to prepare them for drying. The heat ruptures cell walls in the pepper, speeding the work of browning enzymes during drying. The drupes are dried in the sun or by machine for several days, during which the pepper around the seed shrinks and darkens into a thin, wrinkled black layer. Once dried, the spice is called black peppercorn. On some estates, the berries are separated from the stem by hand and then sun-dried without the boiling process.

Once the peppercorns are dried, pepper spirit & oil can be extracted from the berries by crushing them. Pepper spirit is used in many medicinal and beauty products. Pepper oil is also used as an ayurvedic massage oil and used in certain beauty and herbal treatments.

White pepper
White pepper consists of the seed of the pepper plant alone, with the darker-colored skin of the pepper fruit removed. This is usually accomplished by a process known as retting, where fully ripe red pepper berries are soaked in water for about a week, during which the flesh of the pepper softens and decomposes. Rubbing then removes what remains of the fruit, and the naked seed is dried. Sometimes alternative processes are used for removing the outer pepper from the seed, including removing the outer layer through mechanical, chemical or biological methods.

Ground white pepper is often used in cream sauces, Chinese and Thai cuisine, and dishes like salad, light-colored sauces and mashed potatoes, where black pepper would visibly stand out. White pepper has a slightly different flavor than black pepper, due to the lack of certain compounds present in the outer fruit layer of the drupe, but not found in the seed. A slightly sweet version of white pepper from India is sometimes called Safed Golmirch (Hindi), Shada golmorich (Bengali), or Safed Golmirch (Punjabi).
Green pepper
Green pepper, like black, is made from the unripe drupes. Dried green peppercorns are treated in a way that retains the green color, such as treatment with sulphur dioxide, canning or freeze-drying. Pickled peppercorns, also green, are unripe drupes preserved in brine or vinegar. Fresh, unpreserved green pepper drupes, largely unknown in the West, are used in some Asian cuisines, particularly Thai cuisine. Their flavor has been described as spicy and fresh, with a bright aroma. They decay quickly if not dried or preserved.

Wild pepper
Wild pepper grows in the Western Ghats region of India. Into the 19th Century, the forests contained expansive wild pepper vines, as recorded by the Scottish physician Francis Buchanan, (also a botanist and geographer) in his book, A journey from Madras through the countries of Mysore, Canara and Malabar (Volume III). However, deforestation resulted in wild pepper growing in more limited forest patches from Goa to Kerala, with the wild source gradually decreasing as the quality and yield of the cultivated variety improved. No successful grafting of commercial pepper on wild pepper has been achieved to date.

Orange pepper and red pepper
Orange pepper or red pepper usually consists of ripe red pepper drupes preserved in brine and vinegar. Ripe red peppercorns can also be dried using the same color-preserving techniques used to produce green pepper.

Pink pepper and other plants used as pepper
Pink pepper from Piper nigrum is distinct from the more-common dried “pink peppercorns”, which are actually the fruits of a plant from a different family, the Peruvian pepper tree, Schinus molle, or its relative the Brazilian pepper tree, Schinus terebinthifolius. A pink peppercorn (French: baie rose, “pink berry”) is a dried berry of the shrub Schinus molle, commonly known as the Peruvian peppertree. As they are members of the cashew family, they may cause allergic reactions including anaphylaxis for persons with a tree nut allergy.

 

Pepper before ripening

Pepper before ripening

The bark of Drimys winteri (“Canelo” or “Winter’s Bark”) is used as a substitute for pepper in cold and temperate regions of Chile and Argentina where it is easily available.

In New Zealand the seeds of Kawakawa (Macropiper excelsum), a relative of black pepper, are sometimes used as pepper and the leaves of Pseudowintera colorata (mountain horopito) are another replacement for pepper.

Several plants in the United States are used also as pepper substitutes, such as Lepidium campestre, Lepidium virginicum, shepherd’s purse, horseradish, and field Pennycress.

 
Like many eastern spices, pepper was historically both a seasoning and a folk medicine. Long pepper, being stronger, was often the preferred medication, but both were used. Black Pepper (or perhaps long pepper) was believed to cure illness such as constipation, diarrhoea, earache, gangrene, heart disease, hernia, hoarseness, indigestion, insect bites, insomnia, joint pain, liver problems, lung disease, oral abscesses, sunburn, tooth decay, and toothaches. Various sources from the 5th century onward also recommend pepper to treat eye problems, often by applying salves or poultices made with pepper directly to the eye. There is no current medical evidence that any of these treatments has any benefit; pepper applied directly to the eye would be quite uncomfortable and possibly damaging. Nevertheless, black pepper, either powdered or its decoction, is widely used in traditional Indian medicine and as a home remedy for relief from sore throat, throat congestion, cough etc.

Pepper is known to cause sneezing. Some sources say that piperine, a substance present in black pepper, irritates the nostrils, causing the sneezing; Few, if any, controlled studies have been carried out to answer the question.

Piperine is under study for its potential to increase absorption of selenium, vitamin B, beta-carotene and curcumin as well as other nutrients. As a folk medicine, pepper appears in the Buddhist Samaññaphala Sutta, chapter five, as one of the few medicines allowed to be carried by a monk.

Pepper contains phytochemicals, including amides, piperidines, pyrrolidines and trace amounts of safrole which may be carcinogenic in laboratory rodents.

Piperine is under study for a variety of possible physiological effects, although this work is preliminary and mechanisms of activity for piperine in the human body remain unknown.

 
Pepper gets its spicy heat mostly from piperine derived both from the outer fruit and the seed. Black pepper contains between 4.6% and 9.7% piperine by mass, and white pepper slightly more than that. Refined piperine, by weight, is about one percent as hot as the capsaicin found in chili peppers. The outer fruit layer, left on black pepper, also contains important odour-contributing terpenes including pinene, sabinene, limonene, caryophyllene, and linalool, which give citrusy, woody, and floral notes. These scents are mostly missing in white pepper, which is stripped of the fruit layer. White pepper can gain some different odours (including musty notes) from its longer fermentation stage. The aroma of pepper is attributed to rotundone (3,4,5,6,7,8-Hexahydro-3α,8α-dimethyl-5α-(1-methylethenyl)azulene-1(2H)-one), a sesquiterpene originally discovered in the tubers of cyperus rotundus, which can be detected in concentrations of 0.4 nanograms/L in water and in wine: rotundone is also present in marjoram, oregano, rosemary, basil, thyme, and geranium, as well as in some Shiraz wines.

Pepper loses flavor and aroma through evaporation, so airtight storage helps preserve its spiciness longer. Pepper

Handheld pepper mills

Handheld pepper mills

can also lose flavor when exposed to light, which can transform piperine into nearly tasteless isochavicine. Once ground, pepper’s aromatics can evaporate quickly; most culinary sources recommend grinding whole peppercorns immediately before use for this reason. Handheld pepper mills or grinders, which mechanically grind or crush whole peppercorns, are used for this, sometimes instead of pepper shakers that dispense pre-ground pepper. Spice mills such as pepper mills were found in European kitchens as early as the 14th century, but the mortar and pestle used earlier for crushing pepper have remained a popular method for centuries as well.

 

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

August 9, 2014 at 5:47 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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A couple of laundry tips passed along to me from Aundry A.

 
Hint #1 – A tablespoonful of black pepper in the first suds in which you wash cottons, will keep the colors from running.

 

 

Hint #2 – A tablespoon of vinegar to a quart of rinse water is frequently very effective in reviving faded colors.

Black Bean and Turkey Tacos w/ Refried Beans

January 4, 2014 at 7:32 PM | Posted in ground turkey, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ortega, Sargento's Cheese, tacos | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Black Bean and Turkey Tacos w/ Refried Beans

 

 

black-bean-and-turkey-tacos-007 (1)
Another cold start to the day , 11 degrees. Then another sunny afternoon and it actually got up to about 34 degrees! Still forecasting doom and gloom snow and Artic Air coming though. Took Mom’s car in for a tune-up and new tires for her and then to Kroger had to pick up a bag of Shredded Lettuce for part of tonight’s dinner and Mom wanted some Pork Chops for dinner tomorrow. For dinner tonight I prepared Black Bean and Turkey Tacos w/ Refried Beans.

 

 

 

black-bean-and-turkey-tacos-001
I used Jennie – O Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast. Love the Jennie -O Turkey Products, always fresh and low calorie and low carb. I fried it in Canola Oil and seasoned it with Sea Salt, Ground Roasted Cumin, Cilantro Flakes, and 1 package of Old El Paso Low Sodium Taco Seasoning. As I added the Taco Seasoning Mix I also added 1 can of Bush’s Low Sodium Black Beans, I had drained and rinsed them before I added them. Black Beans with Ground Turkey is a perfect pairing for Tacos, added flavor and protein. Mixed well until everything was coated and then simmered another 5 minutes until heated through.

 

 

 
For my other toppings I used 1 small can of Mario Sliced Black Olives, 1 can of Hunt’s Stewed Tomatoes, Sargento 4 Cheese Mexican Shredded Reduced Fat Cheese, Dole Shredded Lettuce, Old El Paso Taco Sauce, and all in a Ortega Whole Grain Corn Taco Shells. Got to have the Ortega Whole Grain Corn Taco Shells, lower in carbs and calories than most other brands and seem to stay fresher than others also. I love Taco Nights! You can have so many different types of Tacos with so many different toppings, just endless options for dinner. For dessert tonight a bowl of Breyer Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream topped with some Smucker’s Sugar Free Hot Fudge Topping!

 

 

Jennie O Extra Lean Ground

Jennie – O Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast

 

Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast
Our leanest ground turkey, all natural, 99 percent fat free with no gluten.
Product Features:
99% fat free
Gluten Free
All Natural
The Biggest Loser® Product
20-oz (1.25 lbs) or 40-oz package (2.5 lbs)

Cooking Instructions:
STOVETOP METHOD:
* Spray skillet with nonstick cooking spray.
* Preheat skillet over medium-high heat.
* Add ground turkey to hot skillet.
* Stir to crumble, approximately 14 to 16 minutes.
* Always cook to well-done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer.

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 0 g
Calories 120 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 15 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 1.5 g Protein 26 g
Saturated Fat .5 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 55 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 70 mg Calcium 0%

 

– See more at: http://www.jennieo.com/products/3-Extra-Lean-Ground-Turkey-Breast#sthash.JhJa9l2O.dpuf

 

 

 
Ortega Whole Grain Corn Taco ShellsOrtega Shells

 

Excellent Source of Fiber and 16 grams of Whole Grains per serving. Each package contains 10 Taco Shells, total net weight of 4.9 oz.

Product Detail
Ortega Whole Grain Taco Shells are rich with flavor and texture and offer the fiber and complex carbohydrates your body needs. Our unique recipe combines whole kernel corn with whole grains for a delicious way to nourish and satisfy your body and the entire family. Plus, only Ortega Taco Shells are carefully placed in a proprietary freshness pack to cushion and protect them from breaking. Each freshness pack is then vacuum sealed to keep the shells fresh and crisp. Taste the Difference!

Ingredients
Whole Yellow Kernal Corn, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Maltodextrin, Corn Bran, Water, Salt, Hydrated Lime.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 2 shells

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 50Calories 110

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 6g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Polyunsaturated Fat 2.5g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 160mg 7%
Total Carbohydrate 17g 6%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Sugars 0g
Protein 2g

 

http://www.ortega.com/products/ortega-whole-grain-taco-shells-10ct_17103

Buffalo T-Bone Steak w/ Baked Potato and Roasted Asparagus

December 29, 2013 at 6:32 PM | Posted in bison, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Buffalo T-Bone Steak w/ Baked Potato and Roasted Asparagus

 

Buffalo T Bone 005

 

Lot of rain today and only a high in the mid 3o’s. Had some Turkey Goetta for breakfast this morning. First time I’ve had it in a while, I really like Goetta! Fries up to nice golden brown with good crunch to it. Had Goetta, one Egg, and Toast. Doctor’s appointment tomorrow afternoon, my 6 month check-up at my Oncologist. For dinner tonight a Buffalo T-Bone Steak w/ Baked Potato and Roasted Asparagus.

 

 

 

It was the first time I’ve had a Buffalo T-Bone Steak. I have 2 of them, 1 left in the freezer, they came in the Wild Idea Buffalo Holiday Package I had purchased. The Buffalo Ribeye was incredible and I think the T-Bone was even better! I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. I then pan fried it Canola Oil about 9 minutes, 5 minutes on one side and 4 1/2 on the other. Had to cook it a bit longer than normal, a thick Steak. It came a perfect medium rare and just bursting with incredible flavor! As any Wild Idea Buffalo cut, just a perfect piece of meat!

 

 

 

For one side I had a Baked Potato that I topped with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn, a dab of Daisy Reduced Fat Sour Cream, and I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter. Then I had some fresh Roasted Asparagus. To prepare the Asparagus I just needed Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Cloves Garlic, minced, Sea Salt, Freshly grated Black Pepper, Lemon Juice, and Shredded Parmesan Cheese. The complete recipe and instructions are at the end of the post. Another fine dinner tonight. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo T Bone Steak

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo 16 oz. T-Bone Steak
Can’t make up your mind? Try the best of both: cut from the mid section of the New York and Tenderloin, conveniently cut into one juicy steak. Cut to 16 oz.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

 

 

 

Roasted Asparagus

INGREDIENTS
1 lb asparagus spears (thick spears are best for roasting)
1-2 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 Cloves Garlic, minced
Sea Salt
Freshly grated Black Pepper
Lemon Juice
Shredded Parmesan Cheese

 

 

METHOD
1 Preheat oven to 400°F. Rinse clean the asparagus. Break the tough ends off of the asparagus and discard.
2 Lay the asparagus spears out in a single layer in a baking dish or a foil-covered roasting pan. Drizzle olive oil over the spears, roll the asparagus back and forth until they are all covered with a thin layer of olive oil. (Alternatively you can put the asparagus and oil in a plastic bag, and rub the bag so that the oil gets evenly distributed.) Sprinkle with minced garlic, salt, and pepper. Rub over the asparagus so that they are evenly distributed.
3 Place pan in oven and cook for approximately 8-10 minutes, depending on how thick your asparagus spears are, until lightly browned and tender when pierced with a fork. Drizzle with a little fresh lemon juice and shredded Parm Cheese before serving.
Yield: Serves 4.

 

Mushroom and Sharp Cheddar Turkey Burger w/ Baked Fries

December 26, 2013 at 6:17 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ore - Ida, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Mushroom and Sharp Cheddar Turkey Burger w/ Baked Fries

 

 

Turkey Burger Cheese Mushroom 006
Well the Holiday’s are over and time to get things back to normal. We didn’t have a lot of decorations so we’ll keep what we have up till this weekend. It’s been a cold but sunny day out today. Ran a couple of errands for Mom and that’s been about it for today. I warmed up the leftovers from the Christmas Feast for Mom and Dad for dinner. Myself, I really didn’t want leftovers so I prepared a Mushroom and Sharp Cheddar Turkey Burger w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 
I used Jennie – O Turkey Burger Patties (Lean). Only 180 calories and 9 g fat and already made into patties. Pan fried them in a 1/2 Tbs of Canola Oil and seasoned it with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper. I served it on an Aunt Millie’s Reduced Calorie Whole Grain Bun and topped with some sauteed sliced Baby Bella Mushrooms and a slice of Sargento Reduced Fat Sharp Cheddar. I also baked some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries. Served these with a side Daisy Reduced Fat Sour Cream. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Double Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

 

Jennie o Lean Turkey Burgers

Jennie o Lean Turkey Burgers

Jennie – O Lean Turkey Burger Patties

An all-natural burger choice.
Product Features:
* Gluten Free
* All Natural
* The Biggest Loser® product

 

Cooking Instructions:
STOVETOP METHOD:
Spray skillet with nonstick cooking spray or add 1-2 teaspoons of oil.
Preheat skillet over medium-high heat.
Place burgers patties in hot skillet.
Cook approximately 15 to 17 minutes, turning occasionally (2-3 times).
Always cook to well-done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer.

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 0 g
Calories 180 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 80 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 9.0 g Protein 21 g
Saturated Fat 2.5 g Vitamin A 2%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 80 mg Iron 6%
Sodium 100 mg Calcium 2%

 

 

– See more at: http://www.jennieo.com/products/70-Lean-Turkey-Burger-Patties#sthash.BexBV2hD.dpuf

 

 

 

 

Ore Ida Simply
Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries

 

You can take the potatoes out of the country.
But you can’t take the country out of our delicious Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries. Simple ingredients like potatoes, olive oil and sea salt – simply prepared. That’s Ore-Ida style.
Ore-Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries:
* French fried potatoes seasoned with cracked black pepper, olive oil and sea salt
* All natural
* Made with Grade A potatoes
* 0 grams trans fat per serving
* Gluten free
* Kosher
SERVING SIZE: 84g
CALS 130
FAT 4 1/2g
SODIUM 290mg
CARBS 22g

 

 

http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/S/Simply-Olive-Oil-and-Sea-Salt-Country-Style-Fries#.UhecmRvOk20

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