10 Good Luck Foods

December 28, 2013 at 10:24 AM | Posted in Food | 4 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

More success, happiness and good health in 2014? We’ll toast to that! Start the new year out right with these good luck recipes. All from the Food.Com web site.

 

 
10 Good Luck FoodsFOOD COM

 
Success: Hoppin’ John

Simple but delicious, Hoppin’ John (made with black-eyed peas) represents success because each pea represents a coin, and a whole serving equals prosperity….

 

 
Happiness: Glitter Grapes

Try the Spanish and Portuguese tradition of eating 12 grapes at midnight on New Year’s Eve — sweet ones supposedly lead to 12 happy months….

 

 
Progress: Roast Pork Loin

Eating pork on New Year’s Day symbolizes progress in several countries, as the pig is known for pushing forward.

 

 
* Click the link below to get all 10 recipes to start of 2014 the right way! *

 
http://www.food.com/slideshow/new-years-good-luck-food-287

New Year’s Day Tradition – Black-Eyed Peas and Greens

December 28, 2012 at 10:40 AM | Posted in beans, cooking, Food | 6 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

New Year’s Day Tradition – Black-Eyed Peas and Greens
On New Year’s Day, you’ll find people throughout the South eating black-eyed peas and greens. Many former Southerners have spread this tradition to other parts of the country. If this tradition is new to you, you probably have lots of questions – how did the tradition start? What do the foods symbolize? How do I cook them? Here are some answers to get you started.

Eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s has been considered good luck for at least 1,500 years. According to a portion of the Talmud BlackEyedPeaswritten around 500 A.D., it was Jewish custom at the time to eat black-eyed peas in celebration of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It’s possible that the tradition arrived in America with Sephardic Jews, who first arrived in Georgia in the 1730s. Common folklore tells that the tradition spread after the Civil War. The Northern Army considered the black-eyed peas to be suitable only for animals, so they didn’t carry away or destroy the crops.

There are a variety of explanations for the symbolism of black-eyed peas. One is that eating these simple legumes demonstrates humility and a lack of vanity. The humble nature of the black-eyed pea is echoed by the old expression, “Eat poor on New Year’s, and eat fat the rest of the year.” Another explanation is that dried beans loosely resemble coins. Yet another is that because dried beans greatly expand in volume, they symbolize expanding wealth.

Clearly, a lot of people closely associate good luck with monetary gain. That’s where the greens come in (in case I need to spell it out, green is the color of U.S. currency). Any green will do, but the most common choices are collard, turnip, or mustard greens. Golden cornbread is often added to the Southern New Year’s meal, and a well-known phrase is, “Peas for pennies, greens for dollars, and cornbread for gold.” Pork is a staple of just about every Southern meal, so it’s usually cooked with the black-eyed peas. The pork seems to be there for flavor as opposed to symbolism, but some theorize that because pigs root forward when foraging, the pork represents positive motion.

There’s no single official way to prepare your black-eyed peas on January 1. One popular dish is Hoppin’ John, which is a mixture of black-eyed peas, rice, and bacon or ham hock. Some people throw a dime into the pot and believe that whoever winds up with the dime in their serving gets extra good luck for the coming year.

http://americanfood.about.com/od/resourcesadditionalinfo/a/New-Years-Day-Tradition-Black-Eyed-Peas.htm

Panko Crusted Orange Roughy Fillet w/ Buttered Corn, Seasoned Black Eye Peas, and…

April 24, 2012 at 5:28 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Egg Beaters, fish, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, low calorie, Margaret Holmes Products, vegetables | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Panko Crusted Orange Roughy Fillet w/ Buttered Corn, Seasoned Black Eye Peas, and Whole Grain Bread

Found some beautiful looking Orange Roughy Fillets at Kroger the other day and decided to have them tonight. They turned out fantastic but due to the way they are caught and over fishing I’ll be using a different mild Fish, perhaps Halibut or Cod. Anyway after rinsing the fillets I rolled them in Flour then dipping them into Egg Beater’s, shaking off the excess. Then rolling them in a Panko Bread Crumbs, onion powder, garlic powder, and paprika mix until covered on both sides of the fillets. I then lightly fried them about 4 minutes per side in Extra Virgin Olive Oil. They came out golden brown and delicious! There’s going to be some tasty fish sandwiches for lunch tomorrow from the leftovers!

Tried 2 new side items tonight, Margaret Holmes Buttered Corn and Margaret Holmes Seasoned Black Eye Peas. Both turned out very good and will be using them again! I left the web site link for Margaret Holmes products at the end of the post. I also had Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert later a Betty Crocker Low Fat Brownie that I had made earlier.

Orange Roughy with Panko

Ingredients
(4) 4oz. Orange Roughy Fillets
1c. Panko Italian Style Bread Crumbs
1tsp. onion powder
1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 tsp. paprika
1/2 c. Egg Beater’s
1/2 c. Flour
1 1/2Tbs. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Directions
Rinse fillets and pat dry. Press both sides of fillet into flour for a light dusting , shaking off any excess flour. Mix bread crumbs, onion powder, garlic powder, and paprika in a separate bowl. Meanwhile, heat Olive Oil in skillet. Dip floured fillets into egg whites, allowing excess to drip off. Place fillets, one at a time, in Panko Bread Crumbs, and lightly toss until both sides are covered. Place in oil and saute 4 minutes each side, or until fillet flakes easily with a fork.

Number of Servings: 4

Margaret Holmes

Buttered Corn

Margaret Holmes buttered corn features fresh, handpicked corn with the perfect amount of creamy butter to highlight the taste and freshness.

Seasoned Blackeye Peas

Containing the highest percentage of protein of any other variety of pea, the Black-Eyed- Pea has been a staple in the southern kitchen for decades. Margaret Holmes Seasoned Black-eyed-Peas are slow simmered in a zesty blend flavorful spices and ready to eat right from the can. Nutritious and excellent by themselves or as an ingredient to soups and salads. Just heat-n-serve!

http://www.margaretholmes.com/

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Traveling In My Kitchen

Exploring the world - one recipe at a time

Hungry Pandas

Dinner, Desserts, and Drinks

Miss Raven's Kitchen

Be creative by flying blind

liz kimchii

Your weekly digest of good eats

Nikole's Kitchen

Live a fulfilling life free of deprivation and full of nourishment.

Peckish Couple

Tasty home-cooked recipes

Missy J White

Food | Motherhood | Lifestyle

Web Bloggers United

We are on a mission to bring together all the favorite bloggers' posts on the web in one place...

Orleans County Cuisine

Let us make beautiful food together

Professional Moron

Daily Doses of Silly Humour & Culture