Drink (green tea) to your health!

June 5, 2014 at 9:17 AM | Posted in green tea | Leave a comment
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A very good article from the Dallas News on one of my favorite drinks, Green Tea. I’m having a cup right now!

 
Drink (green tea) to your health!
By jane sadler

 

Today, my physician assistant needed something to calm her pregnancy-related nausea. She was green as a glass of green tea and in need of assistance. As she cannot tolerate routine prescription anti-nausea medication, I offered her a more natural alternative with a cup of diluted green tea to calm her symptoms.

Green tea has been used in both traditional Chinese and Indian medicine to decrease and control bleeding, improve heart and mental health and aid in digestion. Some studies have shown that green tea may be an adjunct to successful weight loss and even improve liver health in some diabetics.

A new study suggests that green tea “disrupts the metabolism of cancer cells” in pancreatic cancer and could reduce the risk of other cancers or slow its progression.

While facts have been contested, Anti-oxidants may help your body to prevent inflammation that can cause organ damage and adversely affect your immune system. Green tea contains epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a potent anti-oxidant. EGCG is the active ingredient in green tea that is thought to be helpful for stomach problems like vomiting and diarrhea, lower blood pressure, improve type 2 diabetes, cholesterol, memory retention and cancer prevention.

Recently, Veregen, a green tea extract, has been tested and approved by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) to treat genital warts.

Green tea, like black tea, is made from the Camellia sinesis plant, a shrub native to Asia. Unlike black tea, green tea is thought to have higher levels of antioxidants because green tea is less fermented. These less processed plants better retain their vital nutrients.

Studies investigating green tea have not been conclusive; therefore, the FDA does not currently recommend using green tea to treat the above conditions.

The amount of green tea that needs to be consumed to show benefits varies in studies from 3-10 cups per day. It has been suggested that bottled green teas may not have as high levels of EGCG as natural steeped tea and may contain extra ingredients. At 20-45mg per 8 ounces, its caffeine content is approximately ½ the caffeine contained in a cup of coffee.

Talk to your doctor before consuming large amounts of green tea as there can be side effects. Unregulated (i.e. imported) green tea extract may not be safe as they may contain unknown ingredients such as lead.

As for my physician assistant, she looks much less green after her green tea.

**Written with the assistance of Texas A&M medical student, Rhoda Jamadar

 
http://healthblog.dallasnews.com/2014/06/drink-green-tea-to-your-health.html/

Tea production in the United States

April 28, 2012 at 2:59 PM | Posted in green tea | 1 Comment
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Alittle about one of my favorite healthy drinks, Green Tea!

Although Camellia sinensis can be grown in warmer parts of the United States, currently the US mainland has only two commercial tea gardens: a relatively large, fully mechanized plantation in Charleston, South Carolina and a small operation in Burlington, Washington. Off the mainland, there is a collective of roughly 40 small growers in Hawaii.

As of 2010, Washington, South Carolina, and Hawaii Teas are available through mail order and online purchases.

Commercial tea cultivation in the United States has been attempted since 1744 when tea seeds were sent to the Trust Garden in Savannah. The first recorded successful cultivation of the tea plant in the United States is recorded as growing on Skidaway Island near Savannah in 1772. Junius Smith succeeded in growing tea commercially in Greenville, South Carolina, from 1848 until his death in 1853. Dr. Alexis Forster oversaw the next short-lived attempt in Georgetown, South Carolina, from 1874 until his death in 1879. In 1863, the New York Times reported the discovery of tea plants growing natively in Western Maryland and Pennsylvania.

The New York Times report of natively growing tea plants sparked an interest in cultivating the plants commercially. The US Government planted an experimental farm outside Summerville, South Carolina. They ran the program from 1884 until 1888. They concluded that South Carolina’s climate was too unstable to sustain the tea crop. The Department of Agriculture issued a report in 1897 that “estimates the minimum cost about eight times as much to pick one pound of tea in South Carolina as that paid for the same service in Asia.”

In 1888 Dr. Charles Shepard established the Pinehurst Tea Plantation close to the government’s farm. Dr. Shepard secured laborers for the fields by opening a school and making tea-picking part of its curriculum, essentially ensuring a force of child labor while providing them with an education they might not otherwise obtain. Pinehurst produced award winning teas until Dr. Shepard’s death in 1915. The garden closed after Shepard’s death and Pinehurst lay unattended until 1963.

In 1963, The Lipton Tea Company, worried about the instability of the third world countries that produce tea, paid to have the surviving tea plants at Pinehurst moved to a former potato farm on Wadmalaw Island. Lipton operated an experimental tea farm until it was sold in 1987 to Mack Fleming and Bill Hall, who converted the experimental farm into a working tea garden. The Charleston Tea Plantation utilized a converted tobacco harvester to mechanically harvest the tea. The Charleston Tea Plantation sold tea mail order known as American Classic Tea and also produced Sam’s Choice Instant Tea, sold through Sam’s Clubs. American Classic Tea has been the official tea of the White House since 1987. Losing money and nearly bankrupt, in 2003 it was sold to Bigelow Tea Company at a court auction for $1.28 million and was temporarily closed for renovation it in order to attract tourists and boost its revenues. The garden reopened in January 2006 and gives free tours to the public.

Like most plantations, each tea plant at the Charleston Tea Plantation comes from a clone rather than a seed to keep plant characteristics controlled. In this factory, black, oolong, and green tea is made; active harvesting takes place between May and October. The hybrid cotton picker/tobacco harvester modified by Fleming is used to harvest from the upper parts of the plants without injuring them, but cannot do so with the precision of hand-picking, necessary for the highest grades of tea. Inside the factory, leaves are placed on a withering bed for 12–18 hours. Natural air blows over the leaves to reduce the moisture from 80 percent to 68 percent. Then the leaves are chopped, sent to the oxidation bed for 55 minutes, then baked in an oven for about 28 minutes. (These times vary slightly depending on the moisture content of the leaves.) Then the sticks and fibers are sorted out and the remaining leaves are packaged.

Tea was introduced in Hawaii in 1887 and was commercially grown until 1892. While it is not clear why the tea was eventually discontinued, historians believe higher wages compared to other prime tea growing areas in Asia and Africa were among the deciding factors. Lower production costs of tea’s main rival, coffee, also helped prevent it from establishing a foothold.

In the 1960s Lipton and A&B formed a joint venture to investigate the possibility of growing tea commercially in Hawaii. Both companies decided not to open gardens on the Island, but rather to open gardens in Latin and South America.

In 2000 horticulturist Francis Zee found a strain of Camellia sinensis, the tea plant, that can flourish in the tropical climate and volcanic soil of Hawaii. A joint study of commercially growing tea in Hawaii was started by University of Hawaii at Manoa College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources and University of Hawaii at Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

With the decline of the Hawaii’s sugar industry, tea cultivation is seen as a possible replacement crop. In 2003 Hawaii had an estimated 5 acres of land producing tea but by 2005 that number jumped to roughly 80 acres. Tea production in Hawaii is expected to triple by 2008.

In 2004, the Hawaii Tea Society was formed from about 40 members, many of whom had started backyard tea farms to promote tea grown in Hawaii.

Bigelow Tea Cooks Up a Storm With Recipes Inspired by a “Secret” Ingredient — Tea

November 22, 2011 at 9:40 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, green tea, low calorie, low carb | 1 Comment
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FAIRFIELD, CT–(Marketwire -11/22/11)- Delicious, easy to make recipes are alive and well on the Bigelow Tea website. Our recipe vault is overflowing with mouthwatering concoctions, all of which contain a special ingredient — Bigelow tea! From roasted chicken with constant comment® glaze to miniature vegetable quiches to orange spice carrot cake cupcakes and individual fudgy brownies, adding tea to your recipes increases flavor without calories and offers a new twist to your holiday cooking.

Ask our fifteen finalists including the grand prize winner of the Bigelow Tea recipe contest and they will say the same thing: cooking with tea is both fun and exciting. The winner, Diane Halferty, used Bigelow’s mint flavor tea to make this White Chocolate Mint Mousse Tea Cups recipe into an absolutely delightful treat that can be used for the holidays and beyond. “We received so many wonderfully creative recipe submissions for amazing Bigelow tea-inspired treats — from a Crème Brülée featuring our signature tea, ‘Constant Comment’® to Lemon Lift® Infused Chicken, Pumpkin Chai Panna Cotta and more,” said Cindi Bigelow, President of Bigelow Tea.

To join Cindi herself in her own kitchen, check out our latest video where she showcases three recipes made from “Constant Comment”® (tea created by her Grandmother, Bigelow Tea founder Ruth Campbell Bigelow). “Constant Comment® Carrot Cake Cupcakes are my special indulgence,” enthused Cindi. “They’re especially great when accompanied by a cup of your favorite Bigelow Tea!”

About Bigelow Tea Company
100% family owned Fairfield, Connecticut-based Bigelow Tea pioneered the specialty tea category over 65 years ago. Bigelow takes pride in its heritage and successful growth from a one-product, entrepreneurial venture into America’s leading specialty tea company. The BigelowTea line includes more than 120 varieties of flavored, traditional, green tea, organic, herbal, decaffeinated tea and iced teas — including America’s number one specialty tea, “Constant Comment”®. Also, enjoy Bigelow’s Charleston Tea Plantation located on Wadmalaw Island, just south of Charleston, South Carolina produces a full line of American-grown teas known as American Classic Tea.

Bigelow Tea products are available nationwide and every variety can be found on the company website (www.bigelowtea.com). Tea lovers will also enjoy the company’s Tea Talk blog, Facebook page and YouTube profile.

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