Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 9, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 4 Comments
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Healthy Beets……..

I was never a Beet fan but they do have their benefits! Beets are low in calories and a great source of nutrients, including fiber, folate and vitamin C. Beets also contain nitrates and pigments that may help lower blood pressure and improve athletic performance. Lastly, beets are delicious and versatile, fitting well into a healthy and balanced diet.

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Christmas Appetizer Recipes

December 18, 2013 at 8:00 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Some Holiday Ideas from the Eating Well web site! Link is at the bottom of the post.

 

 
Christmas Appetizer RecipesEating Well

 

Host a festive holiday party with these healthy appetizers.
Our easy holiday appetizer recipes are great for a holiday cocktail party or to start your Christmas dinner off deliciously. Try our Roasted Beet Crostini for a festive red-and-green finger food or our Green Chile & Goat Cheese Dip for a flavor-packed chip and dip recipe.

 

 

Roasted Beet Crostini
The entire beet plant—roots, stems and greens—can be used in this stunning appetizer. The beets are roasted then pureed with goat cheese for a creamy ruby-red spread. The greens and stems are sautéed with olive oil and garlic for the topping…..

 

 

 

Green Chile & Goat Cheese Dip
This creamy, cheesy dip is spiked with green chiles and smoky chipotle pepper. Be sure to drain the ricotta the day before you want to serve the dip. Serve with tortilla chips or crackers…..

 

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Christmas Appetizer Recipes *
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/christmas_appetizer_recipes?sssdmh=dm17.710551&utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw121013

Fall Harvest: Chard

September 29, 2013 at 9:04 AM | Posted in vegetables | 2 Comments
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Chard like all cooking greens, chard turns bitter when it gets too hot. Chard grows year-round in temperate areas, is best harvested in late summer or early fall in colder areas, and fall through spring in warmer regions.

 

Red chard growing at Slow Food Nation

Red chard growing at Slow Food Nation

Chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla), is a leafy green vegetable often used in Mediterranean cooking. The leaves can be green or reddish in color like Bib Lettuce, chard stalks also vary in color. Chard has been bred to have highly nutritious leaves at the expense of the root (which is not as nutritious as the leaves). Chard is considered to be one of the healthiest vegetables available, and is a valuable addition to a healthy diet (like other green leafy vegetables). Chard has been around for centuries, but because of its similarity to beets it is difficult to determine the exact evolution of the different varieties of chard.

 

 

Clusters of chard seeds are usually sown between April and August, depending on the desired harvesting period. Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young and tender, or after maturity when they are larger and have slightly tougher stems. Harvesting is a continuous process, as most species of chard produce three or more crops.[10] Raw chard is extremely perishable.

 

 

Cultivars of chard include green forms, such as ‘Lucullus’ and ‘Fordhook Giant’, as well as red-ribbed forms such as ‘Ruby Chard’ and ‘Rhubarb Chard’. The red-ribbed forms are very attractive in the garden, but as a rough general rule, the older green forms will tend to out-produce the colorful hybrids. ‘Rainbow Chard‘ is a mix of other colored varieties that is often mistaken for a variety unto itself.
Chard has shiny, green, ribbed leaves, with petioles that range from white to yellow to red, depending on the cultivar.
Chard is a spring harvest plant. In the Northern Hemisphere, chard is typically ready to harvest as early as April and lasts through May. Chard is one of the more hardy leafy greens, with a harvest season typically lasting longer than kale, spinach or baby greens. When day-time temperatures start to regularly hit 30 °C (86 °F), the harvest season is coming to an end.

 

 

Swiss chard on sale at an outdoor market

Swiss chard on sale at an outdoor market

Chard has a slightly bitter taste and is used in a variety of cultures around the world, including Arab cuisine.
Fresh young chard can be used raw in salads. Mature chard leaves and stalks are typically cooked (like in pizzoccheri) or sauteed; their bitterness fades with cooking, leaving a refined flavor which is more delicate than that of cooked spinach.

 

 

Swiss chard is high in vitamins A, K and C, with a 175 g serving containing 214%, 716%, and 53%, respectively, of the recommended daily value. It is also rich in minerals, dietary fiber and protein.
All parts of the chard plant contain oxalic acid.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 15, 2013 at 9:37 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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If you’ve overcooked a vegetable with a leafy top, such as beet greens or carrots, remove the green top before you store it in the fridge. The leafy tops will leach moisture from the root or bulb and shorten the vegetable’s shelf life.

Just Beet It! 17 Recipes for the Colorful Root

August 15, 2013 at 7:48 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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For all the Beet lovers out there, from the Delish web site.

Just Beet It! 17 Recipes for the Colorful Root
Beets, those beautiful beets — full of natural sugar and vitamins A and C! You can’t go wrong with this gift from nature. Check out how Delishwe’re making the most of beets with these recipes.

Need more salad ideas? Try one of these summertime side salads or one of these no-sweat summer salads that will help you stay cool.

Beet, Avocado, and Arugula Salad

This salad from Nancy Oakes is both hearty and light, combining big flavors (beets, arugula, goat cheese) in a bracing lemon dressing…..

 

Spinach Salad with Citrus and Roasted Beets

Curly leaf spinach has great texture and flavor and holds this mustard dressing well. For additional color, feel free to use a variety of different colored beets. You can also swap blood oranges for the tangerines…..

Click the link below to get these and all the rest of the Beet recipes and tips.

 

http://www.delish.com/recipes/cooking-recipes/beet-recipes?src=nl&mag=del&list=nl_dhe_fot_non_080613_beet-recipes#slide-1

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 19, 2013 at 9:19 AM | Posted in vegetables | 1 Comment
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To make sure beets keep their red color through the entire cooking process, cook them whole with at least two inches of stem still attached, add a few tablespoons of white vinegar to the water.

Pickled Beets

July 31, 2012 at 7:49 AM | Posted in cooking, Food, vegetables | 2 Comments
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Pickled Beets
I’m not a fan of Beets but I thought I would pass along my Mom’s recipe, which came from my Grandmother, for Pickled Beets. My Mom loves Pickled Beets but I never aquired the taste for them. Anyway here’s her recipe.
Ingredients;
4 – 5 bunches of Beets, the bunches will contain anywhere from 4 – 5 Beets. This amount, depending on the size of the Beets, will make 2 – 3 quarts.
Quart Mason Jars and Lids
1 cup Water
2 cups Sugar
2 cups White Cider Viniger
1 – 1.5 oz. container of McCormick Pickling Spice
Directions:
(Preparing the Beets)
* Wash the Beets and trim the leaf steams, except 1″ from the top of the Beet.
* Heat a large kettle of water to a full boil and add Beets.
* Boil Beets until they are tender, fork tender
* Drain water from Beets and cut remaining stem and peel Beets. Cut Beets in half or thirds and set aside.
(Preparing the Pickling Mixture)
* In a large sauce pan add: 1 cup Water, 2 cups Sugar, 2 cups White Cider Viniger, and 1/2 of the 1.5 oz. container of McCormick Pickling Spice. Heat and bring to a boil. this amount will picle 2 – 3 quarts. The recipe as is can be doubled or tripled depending on how many quart you’ll be doing.
* When mixture comes to a boil you can add your Beets to the mixture and reduce heat. Turn off heat and slowly pour the mix into the quart jars. Another way is to add your Beets to the jars and after the Pickling Mixture comes to boil add it to the jars that already contain your Beets. Either way when jars are full seal your quart jars and fasten lids.
*The 4 bunches of Beets my Mom had produced 2 quarts.*

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