One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue in Texas

July 29, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate of South Texas Style BBQ. Potato salad is common in Texas barbecue as a side dish.

Texas Barbecue is a traditional style of preparing meat unique to the cuisine of Texas. It is one of the many different varieties of barbecue found around the world.

Texas barbecue traditions can be divided into four general styles: East Texas, Central Texas, South Texas, and West Texas. The Central and East Texas varieties are generally the most well-known. In a 1973 Texas Monthly article, Author Griffin Smith, Jr., described the dividing line between the two styles as “a line running from Columbus and Hearne northward between Dallas and Fort Worth”.

Additionally, in deep South Texas and along the Rio Grande valley, a Mexican style of meat preparation known as barbacoa can be found. In Spanish, the word barbacoa means “barbecue”, though in English it is often used specifically to refer to Mexican varieties of preparation.

Generally speaking, the different Texas barbecue styles are distinguished as follows:

East Texas style: The meat is slowly cooked to the point that it is “falling off the bone.” It is typically cooked over hickory wood and marinated in a sweet, tomato-based sauce.
Central Texas style: The meat is rubbed with only salt and black pepper or in some restaurants with spices and cooked over indirect heat from pecan or oak wood or mesquite wood or a combination of woods. Sauce is typically considered unneeded but may be served on the side.

West Texas style: The meat is cooked over direct heat from mesquite wood.
South Texas style: Features thick, molasses-like sauces that keep the meat very moist.
The barbacoa tradition is somewhat different from all of these. Though beef may be used, goat or sheep meat are common as well (sometimes the entire animal may be used). In its most traditional form, barbacoa is prepared in a hole dug in the ground and covered with maguey leaves.

European meat-smoking traditions were brought by German and Czech settlers in Central Texas during the mid-19th century. The original tradition was that butchers would smoke leftover meat that had not been sold so that it could be stored and saved. As these smoked leftovers became popular among the migrants in the area, many of these former meat markets evolved to specialize in smoked meats. Many butcher shops also evolved into well-known barbecue establishments.

In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson hosted a state dinner featuring barbecue for the Mexican president-elect in Johnson City, Texas. It is generally considered the first barbecue state dinner in the history of the United States.

In 2019 J. C. Reid of the Houston Chronicle wrote that pulled pork barbecue was becoming common in Texas even though the style originated elsewhere.

Regional styles
Central Texas
Central Texas pit-style barbecue was established in the 19th century along the Chisholm Trail in the towns of Lockhart, Luling, and Taylor. The German and other European immigrants who owned meat-packing plants opened retail meat markets serving cooked meats wrapped in red butcher’s paper—a tradition which continues to this day in many Central Texas towns. This barbecue style’s popularity has spread considerably around the world, especially to Southern California, New York City, Britain and Australia.

Today, many Central Texas barbecue restaurants open around 11:00am and serve until “they are out of meat”. Most barbecue establishments close on Sundays.

At a typical Central Texas pit barbecue restaurant, the customer takes a tray cafeteria-style and is served by a butcher who carves the meat by weight. Side dishes and desserts are then picked up along the line with sliced white bread, wavy-cut dill pickle chips, sliced onion, and jalapeño. Barbecue meats are commonly sold by the pound. The emphasis of Central Texas pit barbecue is on the meat—if sauce is available, it is usually considered a side dip for wetting purposes. Calvin Trillin, writing in The New Yorker, said that discussions of Central Texas pit barbecue do not concern the piquancy of the sauces or common side dishes and desserts—the main consideration is the quality of the cooking of the meats.

Smith posits this theory on why sauces are not a focus of Central Texas pit style: in the early days, the noon meat markets were dominated by the upper class purchasers, who could choose among the highest-quality cuts of meat with little interest in sauces. Smith describes many sauces in Central Texas pit barbecue as intentionally made “bland”, as compared to the flavor of the meats themselves. The sauce is typically thinner and unsweetened, different than the Kansas City and Memphis styles (which rely heavily on molasses, sugar, and corn syrup to provide thickness and sweetness).

Jayne Clark of the USA Today said in 2010 that the “Texas Barbecue Trail” is an east of Austin “semi-loop” including Elgin, Lockhart, Luling, and Taylor. Barbecue eateries in this semi-loop, like Louie Mueller Barbecue, are within one hour’s drive from Austin, in a direction of northeast to the southeast.

East Texas
East Texas barbecue is usually chopped and not sliced. It may be made of either beef or pork, and it is usually served on a bun.

Robb Walsh wrote in “Texas Barbecue in Black and White” that due to the prevalence of beef, African-American varieties of barbecue in East Texas tended to use that instead of the pork found elsewhere in the South. Walsh quoted an artist, Bert Long, who stated that African-American varieties are heavily smoked.

According to Reid, the presence of pork ribs in East Texas barbecue originated from elsewhere in the South. According to Walsh they had origins in barbecues that were held for slaves. Many black restaurateurs struggled to continue operating restaurants as food safety regulations passed by Texas jurisdictions around 1910 had restrictions on the operations of restaurants until the cinder-block pit became widespread; this innovation allowed black restaurateurs to serve their fellow black customers.

Griffin Smith, Jr., in a 1973 Texas Monthly article, described East Texas barbecue as an “extension” of barbecue served in the Southern United States and said that beef and pork appear equally in the cuisine. According to Smith, the theory on how East Texas barbecue got started was that the emphasis on sauces and spices came as African-Americans received poor quality cuts of meat and needed flavoring. According to Smith, the “finest manifestations” of the East Texas style were found in African-American-operated restaurants. Smith further described East Texas barbecue as “still basically a sandwich product heavy on hot sauce.”

 

Other styles
West Texas barbecue, sometimes also called “cowboy style,” traditionally used a more direct heat method than other styles. It is generally cooked over mesquite, with goat and mutton in addition to beef.

Barbecue in the border area between the South Texas Plains and Northern Mexico is mostly influenced by Mexican cuisine. Historically, this area was the birthplace of the Texas ranching tradition. Often, Mexican farmhands were partially paid for their work in less desirable cuts of meat, such as the diaphragm and the cow’s head. It is the cow’s head which defines South Texas barbecue (called barbacoa). The head would be wrapped in wet maguey leaves and buried in a pit with hot coals for several hours, after which the meat would be pulled off for barbacoa tacos. The tongue would also be used to make lengua tacos. Today, barbacoa is mostly cooked in an oven in a bain-marie.

 

Ohio Festivals July 26-28, 2019

July 24, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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July 24-August 4, 2019 Ohio State Fair – Columbus, Ohio
Celebrating Ohio’s agriculture, products, and people for over 150 years, the fair includes concerts, educational exhibits, rides, competitions, and much more. Attendance is over 800,000 annually. Attendance: 800,000.
https://ohiostatefair.com/

July 26-27, 2019 Annual Canal Winchester Blues & Ribfest
Canal Winchester, Ohio
As Ohio’s only all-Blues & Rib-themed festival, this event draws serious rib and blues aficionados from around the state. Sizzling hot ribs and authentic live blues are served up on the streets of historic downtown Canal Winchester Ohio. Fun activities for children and a wine/beer garden for our Blues and Rib lovers over 21 years old will be available.
https://www.bluesandribfest.com/

July 27, 2019 Annual Sweet Corn Challenge Bicycle Festival
Richfield, Ohio
Start the day off with a free all you can eat corn cakes (pancakes) and orange drink breakfast. Ride the 100, 50, 25-mile route, or 10-mile family route through parks, valleys, and farmland. Enjoy a corn-on-the-cob & sandwich lunch, music, and more.
http://sweetcornchallenge.com/

July 27, 2019 – India Food Fair – Macedonia, Ohio
An Indian Food and cultural extravaganza. Come and experience mouth watering Indian cuisine, music, dance and a host of games and entertainment. If you are looking for a fun-filled evening for your whole family, you will not be disappointed. The event will have free entry and free parking! Time: 1:00 pm – 8:00 pm.
https://www.indiafoodfaircleveland.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Memphis-Style Barbecue

July 22, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 5 Comments
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Dry ribs slow cooking in a pit at Leonard’s BBQ

Memphis-style barbecue is one of the five predominant regional styles of barbecue in the United States, the other three being Carolina, Kansas City, Alabama, and Texas. Like many southern varieties of barbecue, Memphis-style barbecue is mostly made using pork, usually ribs and shoulders, though many restaurants will still serve beef and chicken. Memphis-style barbecue is slow cooked in a pit and ribs can be prepared either “dry” or “wet”. “Dry” ribs are covered with a dry rub consisting of salt and various spices before cooking and are normally eaten without sauce. “Wet” ribs are brushed with sauce before, during, and after cooking.

Memphis-style barbecue has become well-known due to the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest held each May, which has been listed in Guinness World Records as the largest pork barbecue contest in the world. The event is regularly covered by national and international television networks such as The Food Network and the BBC and attracts over 100,000 visitors. Many of Memphis’ barbecue restaurants have become nationally known and can ship their products anywhere in the country overnight due to the proximity of FedEx’s Memphis Superhub.

After World War II, barbecue became a viable commercial venture in Memphis. Small restaurants, known as “joints”, began to open with a purpose-built pit for slow-cooking the meat. Many small neighborhood joints in low-income areas, such as Payne’s, Leonard’s and Interstate, have gained notoriety as they reflect the roots of Memphis barbecue. Many regional chains have also developed from Memphis, including Tops, Neely’s, and Corky’s. As Memphis-style barbecue became more popular across the country, restaurants such as Corky’s and Rendezvous began shipping orders overnight to customers.

Notable establishments

Jim Neely’s Interstate Bar-B-Que
Interstate Bar-B-Que was founded in 1978 by Jim Neely in a rundown grocery store in the low-income neighborhood of South Memphis. Though never a restaurateur, Neely learned how to slow cook ribs in a pit and created a secret sauce based on various local family recipes. Interstate rose to prominence as one of the premier barbecue restaurants in the city, and was featured nationally on The Food Network and The Travel Channel. Neely’s brother and sister-in-law operate another location in Gardena, California. Interstate has been voted the #2 barbecue restaurant in America by People Magazine.

Neely’s

Pulled pork nachos

Jim Neely’s four nephews, brothers Gaelin, Tony, Mark and Patrick, founded Neely’s BBQ in Downtown Memphis in 1988, though it operates as a separate business from the other Neely’s and does not carry the Interstate name. In 2008, Pat Neely and his wife Gina debuted a cooking show on The Food Network called Down Home with the Neelys, which is a top ratings performer on the network. The couple has also released a cookbook eponymous with their first show. In 2012, the Neelys announced that they were permanently closing their Memphis-area restaurants.

Charlie Vergos’ Rendezvous
Rendezvous was founded by Charlie Vergos in 1948 in a back alley of Downtown Memphis. Originally the basement of his diner, Vergos discovered a coal chute and turned it into a barbecue pit. Eventually, Vergos converted his diner to a barbecue restaurant and moved the entrance from the street to the alley. Rendezvous is one of the older and more storied barbecue joints in Memphis due to its more than sixty years of operation and “hole-in-the-wall” atmosphere. The Memphis City Council voted to name the alley where Rendezvous is located “Charlie Vergos’ Rendezvous Alley”, though the address remains 52 South 2nd Street. One of Rendezvous’ signature dishes is a barbecue shrimp skillet which must be ordered a full day in advance.

Central BBQ
Central BBQ was founded in 2002 by partners Roger Sapp and Craig Blondis. Central BBQ has four locations in Memphis, with the most recent having opened in East Memphis in 2018. Central BBQ also has a food truck that caters to local events. Though a newcomer to Memphis’ barbecue scene, Central BBQ has placed in the top 3 for barbecue categories in the Memphis Flyer’s annual “Best Of Memphis” contest, as voted for by Memphis residents, every year since its inception. In 2011, Central placed 1st for “Best Barbecue”, 2nd for “Best Ribs”, and 3rd for “Best Hot Wings.”

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Firecracker Coleslaw and Pulled Buffalo BBQ

July 17, 2019 at 6:03 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Firecracker Coleslaw and Pulled Buffalo BBQ . 2 Delicious recipes this week from Wild Idea Buffalo, Firecracker Coleslaw and Pulled Buffalo BBQ. The Firecracker Coleslaw will go great with BBQ, Burger, Hot Dogs, and more! For the Pulled Buffalo BBQ you’ll be using the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast, recipe at the end of the post. Everyone will love this week’s recipes! So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Firecracker Coleslaw
Great with BBQ, Burgers, or on its own! Get the recipe for Pulled Buffalo BBQ here also.

Ingredients:
1 – head green cabbage, halved and sliced thin
1 – red onion, halved and sliced thin
2 – carrots, grated
1 – cup pepperoncini, de-stemmed and flash processed

Dressing Ingredients:
¼ – cup mayonnaise
¼ – cup rice vinegar
1 – small tube wasabi
1 – tablespoon black pepper
1 – tsp. salt

Preparation:

1) Place all vegetables in bowl and toss to incorporate.

2) Mix all dressing ingredients in blender and pour over vegetables, toss to coat and season to taste.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/favorite-summertime-recipes

 

BISON CHUCK ROAST FOR PULLED BUFFALO B.B.Q.
This simple recipe for Pulled Buffalo B.B.Q. using our Bison Chuck Roast will be an instant favorite with family and friends.

Ingredients:

1 – 3 lbs. Chuck Roast, twine removed, rinsed & patted dry
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 cup organic Apple Cider, warmed
1) Pre-heat oven to 500*.
2) Mix 1 tablespoon olive oil with salt and pepper, in dutch oven or heavy pan. Place roast in pan and roll around in seasoning, rubbing into meat.
3) Place roast in hot oven uncovered and roast for 15 minutes.
4) Add warmed Apple Cider, cover pot tightly and lower temperature to 350*.
5) Braise Buffalo Roast for 2 ½ hours turning once during braising time.
6) Roast is finished cooking when meat is tender. You should be able to pull the meat apart using 2 forks, (continue braising for another ½ hour if this is not achieved).
7) Remove form heat and let roast rest at room temperature, covered for 1 hour, or until you are able to handle.
8) Remove roast from pot and place on cutting board. Reserve pan juices. Using two forks or hands pull meat apart into manageable pieces and then pull apart into smaller pieces or shred.
9) Return meat to 1 cup of pan juices.
10) Add 1 cup B.B.Q. sauce, or desired amount, and stir to incorporate. Bring to full heat, adding in more pan juices or B.B.Q. sauce as desired. Reduce heat to simmer.

Serve as entrée or on buns for sandwiches. Accompany with Firecracker Coleslaw.

Jill’s B.B. Q. Sauce

Ingredients:

1 Tb. Olive Oil
1 cup onion, finely diced
2 T. Garlic, chopped
1 T. Black Pepper
1 tsp. Cayenne
1 tsp. Chili Powder
1 tsp. Cumin
1 tsp. Coriander
1 tsp. Cinnamon
½ cup Bourbon
2.4 lbs. Ketchup
1 T. Dijon Mustard
1 T. Worcestershire
Dash of Liquid Smoke

½ cup organic Apple cider or water
1) In heavy saucepan, over medium high heat, heat oil.
2) Add onion and seasonings and sauté for 7 minutes.
3) Deglaze with: 1/2 cup Bourbon or Brandy
4) Add remaining ingredients, and stir until well to incorporate.
5) Add 1/2 cup juice or water to thin as needed. Bring to a boil.

Pour sauce in sealed container and refrigerate.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/79779969-bison-chuck-roast-for-pulled-buffalo-b-b-q

Ohio Festivals – July 12-21, 2019

July 17, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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July 12-20, 2019 14th Ohio Brew Week Festival – Athens, Ohio
Ohio Brew Week celebrates Ohio’s diverse microbrews during the weeklong festival. You can enjoy more than 200 craft beers from 40 Ohio microbreweries. Events include craft brew cooking competiton, Brew BQ Cookoff, homebrew competition, and Boogie on the Bricks.
https://ohiobrewweek.com/

July 19-20, 2019
Marietta Sweet Corn Festival
Marietta, Ohio
Come enjoy hot buttered Ohio sweet corn served fresh on the cob and piping hot. Bring the whole family to experience a wide variety of delicious foods prepared by our local restaurants, events for all ages, contests galore, farm animals, historical exhibits and non-stop entertainment!
http://www.mariettasweetcorn.com/

July 19-21, 2019 – Jazz & Rib Fest – Columbus, Ohio
The Jazz & Rib Fest has become one of the most anticipated traditions in Columbus–thanks to hot ribs, cool jazz and great fans!
https://www.hotribscooljazz.org/

July 20, 2019 – Ukranian Village Festival – Parma, Ohio
Hosted by St. Vladimir Cathedral, the event will offer Ukrainian Foods including Perogies, Stuffed Cabbage, and Borscht. There will be Ukrainian entertainment including dancers, music, displays and demonstrations of Ukrainian art and crafts.
https://www.stvladimirs.org/festival.html

One of America’s Favorites – Kansas City-Style Barbecue

July 15, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Kansas City-style barbecue combo plate with various meats and fries

Kansas City-style barbecue refers to the specific regional barbecue style of slowly smoked meat that originated from the pit of Henry Perry in the early 1900s in Kansas City, Missouri.

Kansas City barbecue is characterized by its use of a wide variety of meats: pork, beef, chicken, turkey, lamb, sausage, and sometimes even fish. Just about any type of barbecued meat served in the country’s other barbecue capitals, from pulled pork to brisket to beef ribs and pork ribs in a number of different cuts, is served in KC-area barbecue restaurants. Burnt ends – the crusty, fatty, flavorful meat cut from the point of a smoked beef brisket – are much in demand.

Kansas City barbecue is rubbed with spices, slow-smoked over a variety of woods and served with a thick tomato-based barbecue sauce, which is an integral part of KC-style barbecue. Most local restaurants and sauce companies offer several varieties with sweet, spicy and tangy flavor profiles, but the staple sauce tends to be both sweet (often from molasses) and spicy. Kansas City barbecue is also known for its many side dishes, including a unique style of baked beans, French fries, coleslaw, and other Southern-food staples.

The Kansas City metropolitan area has more than 100 barbecue restaurants, a number of which are nationally renowned. The area is also home to several large barbecue cooking contests, notably the Great Lenexa BBQ Battle and the American Royal World Series of Barbecue, the largest barbecue competition in the world.

History
Henry Perry
Urban Kansas City traces its barbecue history to Henry Perry, who operated out of a trolley barn at 19th and Highland in the legendary African-American neighborhood around 18th and Vine.

Perry served slow-cooked ribs on pages of newsprint for 25 cents a slab. Perry came from Shelby County, Tennessee, near Memphis, and began serving barbecue in 1908. Kansas City and Memphis barbecue styles are very similar, although Kansas City tends to use more sauce and a wider variety of meats. Perry’s sauce had a somewhat harsh, peppery flavor.

Perry’s restaurant became a major cultural point during the heyday of Kansas City Jazz during the “wide-open” days of Tom Pendergast in the 1920s and 1930s.

Arthur Bryant

Arthur Bryant’s Barbecue at 18th and Brooklyn in Kansas City

Working for Henry Perry was Charlie Bryant, who, in turn, brought his brother, Arthur Bryant, into the business. Charlie took over the Perry restaurant in 1940 after Perry died. Arthur then took over his brother’s business in 1946, and the restaurant was renamed Arthur Bryant’s.

Arthur Bryant’s, which eventually moved to 1727 Brooklyn in the same neighborhood, became a stomping ground for baseball fans and players in the 1950s and 1960s, because of its close proximity to Municipal Stadium, where the Athletics or A’s played their home games during that period.

In April 1972, Kansas City native Calvin Trillin wrote an article in Playboy proclaiming Bryant’s to be the best restaurant on the planet.

Despite new-found fame, Bryant did not change the restaurant’s very simple decor, which consisted of fluorescent lighting, formica tables, and five-gallon jars of sauce displayed in the windows, even as Presidents Harry Truman, Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan stopped by.

Bryant died of a heart attack, in a bed that he kept at the restaurant, shortly after Christmas of 1982. The restaurant is still open. The sauce and restaurant continue their success.

Along the main inner wall of the restaurant is photographic history of many famous politicians, actors, actresses and sports figures and other tribute pictures of military personnel displaying Arthur Bryant’s memorabilia such as shirts or bottles of sauce.

Gates Bar-B-Q headquarters on Brush Creek in Kansas City

Gates & Sons
In 1946 Arthur Pinkard, who was a cook for Perry, joined with George Gates to form Gates and Sons Bar-B-Q. The restaurant was situated initially in the same neighborhood.

Gates barbecue sauce does not contain molasses; the ingredients, as listed on the bottle, are: “Tomatoes, vinegar, salt, sugar, celery, garlic, spices, and pepper. 1/10 of 1% potassium sorbate preservative added.” It is available in Original Classic, Mild, Sweet & Mild, and Extra Hot varieties.

Gates also expanded its footprint in a more conventional way, with restaurants all displaying certain trademarks – red-roofed buildings, a recognizable logo (a strutting man clad in tuxedo and top hat) and the customary “Hi, May I Help You?” greeting belted out by its employees as patrons enter.

Gates has opened restaurants throughout the Kansas City metropolitan area. The chain currently consists of 6 area Gates Bar-B-Q restaurants: 4 in Missouri, 2 in Kansas. Gates also has sold barbecue sandwiches at Kauffman Stadium during Kansas City Royals home games, and currently at Arrowhead Stadium during Kansas City Chiefs home games.

Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue
Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue had its beginnings as the second restaurant in the Smokestack BBQ chain, which Russ Fiorella, Sr. had started in 1957. Fiorella’s eldest son Jack worked with his father until 1974, when he and his wife Delores opened their own Smokestack location in the Martin City neighborhood of south Kansas City.

Eventually Jack, along with his wife and children, decided to expand their menu selections, adding non-traditional barbecue menu items like hickory-grilled steaks, lamb ribs, Crown Prime Beef Short Ribs, and fresh, hickory-grilled seafood, along with an extensive wine and bar selection. They also began offering a higher level of comfort and service than most people were accustomed to at a barbecue restaurant. Smokestack BBQ in Martin City soon became one of the most successful restaurants in the Kansas City metro. In 1996, Jack Fiorella was named Restaurateur of the Year by the Greater Kansas City Restaurant Association.

By the mid-1990s, Jack Fiorella decided to replicate the success of his Martin City Smokestack restaurant. Other members of the Fiorella family told Jack that he was not permitted to use the Smokestack name for his new restaurant, so both the new restaurant (opened in 1997 in Overland Park, Kansas) and Jack’s existing restaurant in Martin City dropped the Smokestack name and were rebranded as Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue. They also opened a full-service catering operation in Martin City and their third location in the historic Freight House building in the Crossroads Arts District. They began shipping their barbecue nationwide in 2000, and in October 2006 they opened a fourth location on The Country Club Plaza. In 2014, a fifth Jack Stack restaurant opened in Lee’s Summit, Missouri. The original Smokestack chain closed its last remaining location in 2012.

Fiorella’s Jack Stack Barbecue has been featured on The Food Network and The History Channel, and has been rated as among the best barbecue in the United States by several national organizations and magazines. Most notably, the Zagat Survey has named it the “#1 Barbecue House in the Country.”

The original Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que in Kansas City, Kansas

Joe’s Kansas City
Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que can be traced to competition barbecue and the Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS). Accompanying friends at the American Royal and The Great Lenexa BBQ Battle inspired Jeff Stehney to start cooking on his own. The first smoker purchased was an Oklahoma Joe’s 24” smoker, christened in April 1991.

By 1993, Jeff, his wife and business partner Joy, and Jim “Thurston” Howell were ready to make their mark on the KCBS competition circuit. Their competition team, Slaughterhouse Five, ended up winning eight Grand Championships, including the prestigious American Royal BBQ, three Reserve Grand Championships, and the KCBS’s Grand Champion “Team of the Year” in 1993. Over the next several seasons Slaughterhouse Five won dozens more awards and was generally recognized as one of the top competition BBQ teams in the Country.

Jeff and Joy opened Oklahoma Joe’s Bar-B-Que (later renamed to Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que) in a gas station in Kansas City, Kansas in 1996. There are also locations in Olathe, Kansas and Leawood, Kansas.

Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain listed Joe’s original Kansas City, Kansas location as one of “13 Places You Must Eat Before You Die”. Men’s Health magazine named it America’s manliest restaurant. Joe’s was featured on Season 3 of Man v. Food in August 2010. It was also named “Kansas City’s Best Barbecue” by Zagat.

LC’s Bar-B-Q
Mississippi born L.C. Richardson took early retirement as a company chef for Farmland Industries and opened LC’s Bar-B-Q near the Truman Sports Complex in 1986. LC’s specializes in burnt ends and ribs, and utilizes a sauce similar to Gates’ but with substantially less sugar and more vinegar. LC’s also sauces the meat prior to smoking and continually saucing throughout the cooking process. This technique forms a thin, chewy and extremely flavorful layer on the outside of the meat and effectively seals the ribs, resulting in a remarkably tender and juicy finished product. LC’s side dishes, especially the baked beans and the fresh-cut fries, are almost as notable as the meats. LC’s Bar-B-Q has also been featured on the Travel Channel’s, “Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations”.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ
In October 1990, after leaving a sales job, Lindsay Shannon and his wife Jo opened B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ in south Kansas City. The main focus of B.B.’s is Kansas City style barbecue and Louisiana dishes. The menu includes Kansas City favorites like ribs, sausage and pulled pork, which are slow-smoked in a 60-year-old pit with apple wood. The Louisiana dishes include gumbo, jambalaya, and goulash. Not long after opening in October 1990, owner Lindsay Shannon decided to add another one of his passions: blues music. Local and national blues bands perform at B.B.’s six nights a week. B.B.’s is known as “where barbecue meets the blues” in Kansas City. B.B.’s has been featured in the New York Times, and USA Today. About.com lists B.B.’s in the Top 5 Barbeque Restaurants in Kansas City. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ has also been featured on Food Network’s, ” Diners, Drive Ins, and Dives “, hosted by Guy Fieri.

KC Masterpiece
In 1977, Rich Davis capitalized on the reputation of Kansas City barbecue to form KC Masterpiece, which evolved from his “K.C. Soul Style Barbecue Sauce”. KC Masterpiece is sweeter and thicker than many of the traditional Kansas City sauces served in the region. The KC Masterpiece recipe uses extra molasses to achieve its thick, sweet character.[citation needed]

KC Masterpiece was sold to the Kingsford division of Clorox in 1986 and now claims to be the number one premium barbecue brand in the U.S. When Davis sold the rights to his sauce to Kingsford, he announced plans to build a franchise of barbecue restaurants. The franchises were successful for a few years, but have since all closed.

Curt’s Famous Meats storefront

Curt’s Famous Meats

Curt’s Famous Meats is a meat market founded in 1947 by Curtis Jones and sold to Donna Pittman in 1989. With clientele from all across America, Curt’s specializes in barbecue prepared with Kansas City rub. It has a long history of award winning barbecue, having won eight times the American Royal barbecue competition, the largest in the world. Curt’s is located on East Truman Road in the Maywood neighborhood of Independence, Missouri. Although not in Kansas City proper, Curt’s has been a large competitor in many local competitions in barbecue. Curt’s Famous Meats is also known for its predominantly female staff that Donna Pittman has hired. They are known locally as the Lady Meat Cutters.

Kansas City Barbeque Society
The Kansas City Barbeque Society (KCBS) was founded in 1986. With over 13,000 members worldwide, it is the world’s largest organization of barbecue and grilling enthusiasts. KCBS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to “promoting barbecue as America’s cuisine and having fun while doing so.”

KCBS sanctions nearly 300 barbecue contests across the U.S. each year and offers assistance to civic and charitable organizations with producing these events. The KCBS has developed a set of rules and regulations that govern all official KCBS competitions.

KCBS offers educational programs, consultation services and civic organization presentations to help spread the gospel of barbecue. The mission of the Kansas City Barbeque Society is to celebrate, teach, preserve and promote barbecue as a culinary technique, sport and art form.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue in North Carolina

July 8, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Carolina style chopped pork barbecue

Barbecue is an important part of the heritage and history of the U.S. state of North Carolina. It has resulted in a series of bills and laws that relate to the subject, and at times has been a politically charged subject. In part, this is due to the existence of two distinct types of barbecue that have developed over the last few hundred years: Lexington style and Eastern style. Both are pork-based barbecues but differ in the cuts of pork used and the sauces they are served with. In addition to the two native varieties, other styles of barbecue can be found throughout the state.

North Carolina barbecue benefits from a wide variety of influences, from Native Americans, to colonizers, to enslaved Africans on plantations to more modern ones, such as newer equipment and methods to cook the meat.

Social events such as weddings, church events, or other celebrations are often conducted as a pig pickin’, where the main course is a barbecued whole pig, spawning a whole subcategory of catering that specializes solely in this craft.

There is a somewhat light-hearted feud that exists between the proponents of the two types of barbecue: Lexington style and Eastern style. Author Jerry Bledsoe, the self-professed “world’s leading, foremost barbecue authority” claimed that Dennis Rogers, (columnist for The Raleigh News & Observer and self-professed “oracle of the holy grub”) “has ruined any chances of this state being distinguished in its barbecue.” While a degree of humor is involved, choice of barbecue type is a politically charged topic. In 2006, North Carolina House Bill 21 and North Carolina Senate Bill 47 were introduced (and ultimately defeated), sparking controversy over one of the two different styles being declared “official”, as they would have made the Lexington Barbecue Festival the official barbecue festival of North Carolina.

In a political compromise in 2007, NC House Bill 433 passed, granting the Lexington Barbecue Festival the title of “Official Food Festival of the Piedmont Triad Region of the State of North Carolina”. This effectively bypassed any controversy regarding Eastern barbecue and the region, and prevented any confusion with the title creating a singular, official barbecue for the entire state.

Types of barbecue

Lexington Barbecue Festival

Lexington style
Lexington style barbecue (occasionally referred to as Piedmont or Western style) uses a “red” sauce/dip that is seasoned with vinegar (ideally apple cider vinegar) with a little ketchup , and usually red pepper flakes, along with other spices that vary from recipe to recipe. It is most common in the Piedmont (central) and western areas of the state. This style uses only the pork shoulder section of the pig. As with other styles of barbecue, the recipes vary widely, and can include many different ingredients, and range from slightly sweet to hot and spicy. The dip also serves as the seasoning base for “red slaw” (also called “barbecue slaw”), which is coleslaw made by using Lexington-style barbecue sauce (or similar) in place of mayonnaise. Hushpuppies are usually consumed with pork shoulder and slaw.

Eastern style
Eastern-style barbecue is a whole-hog style of barbecue, often said to use “every part of the hog except the squeal”. Eastern-style sauce is vinegar- and pepper-based, with no tomato whatsoever. With Eastern Slaws, the ketchup disappears, and the mayonnaise (or whipped salad dressing) is almost universal.

Pork ribs
Pork ribs are a common alternative to the two most common types of North Carolina barbecue and a variety of festivals and competitions, such as the Twin City RibFest, are held annually. Baby Back Ribs, sometimes called top loin ribs, are short, succulent, well-marbled ribs cut from the center section of the loin. Spareribs come from lower down the rib cage (from the sides and upper belly of the pig). Larger and longer than baby backs, they contain more connective tissue, so are a little tougher, but more flavorful.

Cooking methods

Pit style
A pit barbecue is a method and constructed item for barbecue cooking meat and root vegetables buried below the surface of the earth. Indigenous peoples around the world used earth ovens for tens of thousands of years. In modern times the term and activity is often associated with the Eastern Seaboard, the “barbecue belt”, colonial California in the United States and Mexico. The meats usually barbecued in a pit in these contexts are beef, pork, and goat, with pork being the predominant choice in North Carolina.

Pit barbecue can also refer to an enclosed, above-ground “pit” such as a horno or outdoor pizza oven. The method of cooking the meat is slow, using various hardwoods to flavor the meat. This breaks down the connective tissue in the meats, producing a tender product. The types of meat cooked in this fashion include both beef and pork.

Smoke box style

A wood-fired barbecue pit.

Contrast to grilling

Oftentimes the two phrases “barbecuing” and “grilling” are mistakenly used as interchangeable words, although they imply completely different cooking methods. Grilling is a cooking method that uses dry heat, supplied by burning wood, charcoal or gas flame, and the heat is applied to the surface of the food being cooked. Typically food is cooked quickly using this method. Barbecuing is a slower process that uses lower heat and often the food is cooked by the heat of the smoke itself, rather than directly by the heat of the burning wood.

Barbecue related festivals

The Lexington Barbecue Festival is a one-day festival held each October and attracts 160,000 or more visitors to Lexington, North Carolina. The festival is held each October in uptown Lexington, a city of approximately 20,000 residents. Several city blocks of Main Street are closed to vehicle traffic for the event. In addition to a barbecue competition there are carnival rides, a number of music and entertainment venues, and over 100 vendors from all over the region participating. It is the Official Food Festival of the Piedmont Triad Region of the State of North Carolina.

In 2012, the US News and World Report ranked Lexington as #4 on its list of the best US cities for barbecue.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue in the United States

July 1, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A slab of barbecued pork ribs at Oklahoma Joe’s in Tulsa.

In the United States, barbecue refers to a technique of cooking meat outdoors over a fire; often this is called pit barbecue, and the facility for cooking it is the barbecue pit. This form of cooking adds a distinctive smoky taste to the meat; barbecue sauce, while a common accompaniment, is not required for many styles.

Often the proprietors of Southern-style barbecue establishments in other areas originate from the South. In the South, barbecue is more than just a style of cooking, but a subculture with wide variation between regions, and fierce rivalry for titles at barbecue competitions.

There are 3 ingredients to barbecue. Meat and wood smoke are essential. The use of a sauce or seasoning varies widely between regional traditions.

The first ingredient in the barbecue tradition is the meat. The most widely used meat in most barbecue is pork, particularly the pork ribs, and also the pork shoulder for pulled pork. The techniques used to cook the meat are hot smoking and smoke cooking. These cooking processes are distinct from the cold smoking preservation process. Hot smoking is where the meat is cooked with a wood fire, over indirect heat, at temperatures between 120 and 180 °F (50 and 80 °C), and smoke cooking (the method used in barbecue) is cooking over indirect fire at higher temperatures, often in the range of 250°F (121°C) ±50°F (±28°C). The long, slow cooking process take hours, as many as 18, and leaves the meat tender and juicy. Characteristically, this process leaves a distinctive line of red just under the surface, where the myoglobin in the meat reacts with carbon monoxide from the smoke, and imparts the smoky taste essential to barbecue.

The second ingredient in barbecue is the wood used to smoke the meat. Since the wood smoke flavors the food, the particular type of wood used influences the process. Different woods impart different flavors, so the regional availability of the various woods for smoking influences the taste of the region’s barbecue. Smoking the meat is the key, as otherwise cooking meat over an open flame is simply “grilling” the meat, whereas barbecue is the actual process of “smoking” it.

* Hard woods such as hickory, mesquite, pecan and the different varieties of oak impart a strong smoke flavor.
* Maple, alder, and fruit woods such as apple, pear, and cherry impart a milder, sweeter taste.
Stronger flavored woods are used for pork and beef, while the lighter flavored woods are used for fish and poultry. More exotic smoke generating ingredients can be found in some recipes; grapevine adds a sweet flavor, and sassafras, a major flavor in root beer, adds its distinctive taste to the smoke.

The last, and in many cases optional, ingredient is the barbecue sauce. There are no constants, with sauces running the gamut from clear, peppered vinegars to thick, sweet, tomato and molasses sauces to mustard-based barbecue sauces, which themselves range from mild to painfully spicy. The sauce may be used as a marinade before cooking, applied during cooking, after cooking, or used as a table sauce. An alternate form of barbecue sauce is the dry rub, a mixture of salt and spices applied to the meat before cooking.

Typical plate of chopped pork barbecue as served in a restaurant with barbecue beans, sauce and Texas toast

The origins of American barbecue date back to colonial times, with the first recorded mention in 1672 and George Washington mentions attending a “barbicue” in Alexandria, Virginia, in 1769. As the country expanded westwards along the Gulf of Mexico and north along the Mississippi River, barbecue went with it.

The core region for barbecue is the southeastern region of the United States, an area bordered on the west by Texas and Oklahoma, on the north by Missouri, Kentucky, and Virginia, on the south by the Gulf of Mexico, and on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. While barbecue is found outside of this region, the fourteen core barbecue states contain 70 of the top 100 barbecue restaurants, and most top barbecue restaurants outside the region have their roots there.

Barbecue in its current form grew up in the South, where cooks learned to slow-roast tough cuts of meat over fire pits to make them tender.

These humble beginnings are still reflected in the many barbecue restaurants that are operated out of “hole-in-the-wall” (or “dive”) locations; the rib joint is the purest expression of this. Many of these will have irregular hours, and remain open only until all of a day’s ribs are sold; they may shut down for a month at a time as the proprietor goes on vacation. Despite these unusual traits, rib joints will have a fiercely loyal clientele.

Barbecue is strongly associated with Southern cooking and culture due to its long history and evolution in the region. Indian corn cribs, predecessors to Southern barbecue, were described during the Hernando de Soto expedition in southwest Georgia, and were still around when English settlers arrived two centuries later. Early usage of the verb barbecue, derived from Spanish barbacoa, meant “to preserve (meat) by drying or slowly roasting”; the meaning became closer to that of its modern usage as a specific cooking technique by the time Georgia was colonized. Today, barbecue has come to embody cultural ideals of communal recreation and faithfulness in certain areas. These ideals were historically important in farming and frontier regions throughout the South and parts of the Midwest with influences from the South. As such, due to the strong cultural associations that it holds in these areas, barbecue has attained an important position in America’s culinary tradition.

Parts of the Midwest also incorporate their own styles of barbecue into their culinary traditions. For example, in Kansas City, barbecue entails a wide variety of meats, sweet and thick sauces, dry rubs, and sliced beef brisket. Kansas City barbecue is a result of the region’s history; a combination of the cooking techniques brought to the city by freed slaves and the Texas cattle drives during the late nineteenth century has led to the development of the region’s distinctive barbecue style. Barbecue as a cultural tradition spread from the South and was successfully incorporated into several Midwestern regions such as western Missouri, again owing to the cultural ideals that the barbecue tradition represents and the need for locals to express those ideals. Variations of these ideals by region are reflected in the great diversity of barbecue styles and traditions within the United States.

Barbecue has been a staple of American culture, especially Southern American culture, since colonial times. As it has emerged through the years many distinct traditions have become prevalent in the United States. The pig, the essential ingredient to any barbecue, became a fundamental part of food in the South in the 18th century because the pig requires little maintenance and is able to efficiently convert feed to meat (six times quicker than beef cattle). As a result of the prevalence of hogs in the South, the pig became synonymous with Southern culture and barbecue. The origins of the pig symbol with Southern Culture began as a result of its value as an economic commodity. By 1860, hogs and southern livestock were valued at double the cotton crop, at a price of half a billion dollars. The majority of pigs were raised by residents of the South and as a result the pigs contributed considerably to the economic well-being of many Southerners.

A barbecued pig

Pigs and barbecue were not only valuable for economic reasons but barbecue “scores of hog” were set aside for large gatherings and often used as an enticement for political rallies, church events, as well as harvest festival celebrations. Barbecues have been a part of American history and tradition from as early as the first Independence Day celebration. In the early years, Independence Day was celebrated as a formal civil gathering, in which egalitarian principles were reinforced. The traditions of Independence Day moved across the country as settlers traveled to western territories. By the 19th century, the role of barbecue in public celebration and political institutions increased significantly and it became the leading practice of communal celebrations in the South as well as the Midwest. The important social, political, and cultural gatherings of barbecues have spanned three centuries and its cultural significance remains important today.

While the wide variety of barbecue styles makes it difficult to break barbecue styles down into regions, there are four major styles commonly referenced, Carolina and Memphis, which rely on pork and represent the oldest styles, and Kansas City and Texas, which use beef as well as pork, and represent the later evolution of the original Deep South barbecue. Pork is the most common meat used, followed by beef and veal, often with chicken or turkey in addition. Lamb and mutton are found in some areas, such as Owensboro, Kentucky (International Bar-B-Q Festival), and some regions will add other meats…………..
(To be continued)

 

Healthy BBQ and Grilled Chicken Recipes

June 11, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy BBQ and Grilled Chicken Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy BBQ and Grilled Chicken Recipes like; Beer-Glazed Chicken with Grilled Vegetables, Maple-Bourbon Chicken with Grilled Sweet Potatoes, and Grilled Chicken Thighs with Jerk Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy BBQ and Grilled Chicken Recipes
Find healthy, delicious BBQ and grilled chicken recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Beer-Glazed Chicken with Grilled Vegetables
Need a new chicken dinner idea? Try this grilled chicken and vegetable dish from chef Rick Bayless. Grilling the chicken and summer vegetables is a no-brainer, but in colder months, you may wish to move indoors and roast the chicken, along with some root vegetables. Whatever the weather, it’s worth seeking out piloncillo for the beer glaze. This unrefined sugar used in Mexican cooking is made from evaporated cane juice. Its complex caramelized flavor balances any bitterness in the beer. Look for it in Latin markets and online……………..

Maple-Bourbon Chicken with Grilled Sweet Potatoes
The sweetness in this Maple-Bourbon Chicken recipe is from the real maple syrup and grilled sweet potatoes. Bacon is also included!…………

Grilled Chicken Thighs with Jerk Sauce
Jamaican jerk sauce traditionally uses Scotch bonnet peppers; here, we substitute jalapeños for a milder flavor. The jerk sauce serves as both a marinade and a sauce for meaty grilled chicken thighs. This healthy grill recipe takes just 30 minutes of active time, so as long as you plan ahead and factor in the marinating time it’s perfect for a quick weeknight dinner or easy weekend BBQ………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy BBQ and Grilled Chicken Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18928/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/bbq-grilled/

Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes

June 9, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes with recipes including; Beer-Glazed Chicken with Grilled Vegetables, Open-Face Italian Chicken Sandwiches with Avocado Slaw, and Chicken Pesto Pasta with Asparagus. Find these Finger Licking Recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. And if your looking for a good cooking and recipe Magazine subscribe to one of my favorites the EatingWell Magazine! So Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken main dish recipes including chicken and pasta, easy chicken casseroles, low-calorie chicken recipes, and chicken pot pie. Healthier Recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Beer-Glazed Chicken with Grilled Vegetables
Need a new chicken dinner idea? Try this grilled chicken and vegetable dish from chef Rick Bayless. Grilling the chicken and summer vegetables is a no-brainer, but in colder months, you may wish to move indoors and roast the chicken, along with some root vegetables. Whatever the weather, it’s worth seeking out piloncillo for the beer glaze. This unrefined sugar used in Mexican cooking is made from evaporated cane juice. Its complex caramelized flavor balances any bitterness in the beer. Look for it in Latin markets and online…………..

Open-Face Italian Chicken Sandwiches with Avocado Slaw
The quick tomato topping on these hearty and healthy chicken sandwiches will remind you of pizza. The accompanying slaw swaps out mayo for healthier avocado. Cook the chicken breasts on the grill if you prefer (see Tip) and consider making a double batch of the chicken for lunches and dinners later in the week……..

Chicken Pesto Pasta with Asparagus
This healthy chicken pesto pasta is easy to make thanks to convenience ingredients like rotisserie chicken and store-bought pesto. The addition of fresh asparagus—which is cooked in the same pot as the pasta—brightens up the look and the flavors of this family-friendly and easy one-pot dinner. Fresh basil, if you have it on hand, is a nice finishing touch…………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17932/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/main-dish/

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