Ohio Festivals – October 7th – 11th, 2022

October 6, 2022 at 10:11 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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October 7-9, 2022 59th Annual Ohio Gourd Show – Delaware, Ohio
Food, gourds, gourd art, gourd music and special programs are featured on the grounds. Programs and presentations will provide information about gourds and gourd art. Gourd crafting opportunities will be available for children and adults without advance reservations. Gourd workshops (pre-registration required ) are offered on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.
https://ohiogourdsociety.com/

October 8, 2022 – Yellow Springs Street Fair – Yellow Springs, Ohio
An all-day festival with entertainment throughout the Village. Over 200 booths. Two Music Stages, a Beer Garden and Street Performers throughout town. A Festival like no other! June 13 and October 10, 2020 – 9am – 5pm.
https://www.yellowspringsohio.org/street-fair/

October 8-9, 2022 Annual Ohio Sauerkraut Festival – Waynesville, Ohio
The Ohio Sauerkraut Festival has grown from a small local event in 1970 to one of the premier craft festivals in the nation. We jury our 450+ vendors to ensure that all items are handcrafted, and select items based on quality and variety. Our unique food offerings range from sauerkraut pizza to fudge. Visitors return year after year to sample their favorites, making the Ohio Sauerkraut Festival a favorite Midwest destination. Attendance: 350,000+.
https://sauerkrautfestival.waynesvilleohio.com/

October 11-15, 2022 Annual Bradford Pumpkin Show – Bradford, Ohio
Parades, pageant, bread & pie contests, Cornhole Tournament, Kiddie Tractor Pull, Pumpkin Parade, Pumpkin Art, talent show and much more!
http://www.bradfordpumpkinshow.org/index.html

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September 17-18, 2022 Preble County Pork Festival – Eaton, Ohio

September 14, 2022 at 2:19 PM | Posted in Festivals, Pork, Pork Back Ribs, pork chops, pork roast, pork tenderloin | Leave a comment
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Always 3rd full weekend in September. Entertainment, exhibits, food, parade and more! Every year the festival is packed with thing to do and see. It lasts all weekend long because there is simply too much to cram into one day! But if there’s one things everyone agrees on, it’s that the food is always out-of-sight awesome! Over the course of the weekend, a lot of people eat a lot of pork.
https://www.porkfestival.org/

Welcome To The Preble County Pork Festival
Each year, when September rolls around, the Preble County Fairgrounds are transformed into the Pork Festival. The Festival is a community event – held in the community, by members of the community, to benefit the community. It is made possible by the hard work of volunteers, the generosity of sponsors and most important, the droves of local residents and visiting families from outside Preble County that attend the festival every year.

Few Things To Note:
When coming to the festival please note of the following items:

• NO Pets, service dogs welcome
• Scooter rental available; call 866-464-5805 for reservations
• ATM’s are available for your convenience

PORK FESTIVAL ANNUAL PARADE
Saturday September 17, 2022 | 10:30 AM
Come enjoy our huge parade that features local high school bands, local business, fire and EMS departments and so much more! The parade begins at the intersection of Barron St. & Decatur St. and ends in front of the grandstands at the Preble County fairgrounds.
Float entries will be judged and awarded $50.00 for each of the following categories:
• Best entry with pork industry related theme
• Best commercial entry
• Most colorful entry
• Best entry from a Preble County organization
• Judges choice

If you would like to be apply to be a part of our parade, please either fill out the the application below or click on the button to print and mail yours in. All applications MUST be submitted by August 31, 2022. If there there are parade openings available, applications postmarked AFTER August 31 may be considered.
2022 Theme: For the Love of the Pork Festival
https://www.porkfestival.org/

Kitchen Hint of the Day! THURSDAY

July 7, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Make it count when cooking…..

 

Firing up the gas grill? Don’t stop with just tonight’s entree of barbecued chicken breasts. Add several more pieces and hold the barbecue sauce. Next night, serve half of the chicken shredded, over salad, and add dressing made from walnut oil and raspberry vinegar. The following night, reheat the remaining chicken, shredded, with salsa, crushed garlic, a squeeze of lime juice and a dash of oregano, and serve delicious chicken fajitas, wrapped in steaming flour tortillas. Cook once, but plan to eat at least three times.
https://organizedhome.com/kitchen-tips/summer-cooking

Ohio Festivals June 8th – 10th, 2022

July 6, 2022 at 10:54 PM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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July 8-9, 2022
Ohio Veterans 14th Annual BBQ Cook-off
Kettering, Ohio
The annual Kansas City BBQ Society sanctioned event is presented by American Legion Post 598 of Kettering. Watch professional BBQ teams vie for the championship trophy and share in a purse of $6,000! Live Band.
https://www.facebook.com/BbqOhio/

 

July 8-10, 2022 Delta Chicken Festival – Delta, Ohio
Enjoy chicken dinners, a midway, elephant rides, entertainment, pageant, Chicken Run, pancake breakfast, volleyball and dodgeball tournaments, and a parade.
https://sites.google.com/view/deltachickenfestival/

 

July 8-16, 2022 – Annual Ohio Brew Week – Athens, Ohio
Ohio Brew Week celebrates Ohio’s diverse microbrews during the weeklong festival. You can enjoy more than 200 craft beers from 40 Ohio microbreweries. Events include craft brew cooking competition, Brew BQ Cookoff, homebrew competition, and Boogie on the Bricks.
https://ohiobrewweek.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

July 4, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans is a dish traditionally containing white beans that are parboiled and then, in the US, baked in sauce at low temperature for a lengthy period. In the United Kingdom, the dish is sometimes baked, but usually stewed in sauce. Canned baked beans are not baked, but are cooked through a steam process.

Baked beans originate in Native American cuisine, and are made from beans indigenous to the Americas. The dish was adopted and adapted by English colonists in New England in the 17th century and, through cookbooks published in the 19th century, spread to other regions of the United States and into Canada. Today, in the New England region of the United States, a variety of indigenous legumes are used in restaurants or in the home, such as Jacob’s cattle, soldier beans, yellow-eyed beans, and navy beans (also known as native beans).

Originally, Native Americans sweetened baked beans with maple syrup, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists used brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century, the convention of using American-made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular to avoid British taxes on sugar. Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, a dish whose popularity has given Boston the nickname “Beantown”.

Today, baked beans are served throughout the United States alongside barbecue foods and at picnics. Beans in a brown sugar, sugar, or corn syrup sauce (with or without tomatoes) are widely available throughout the United States. Bush Brothers are the largest producer. After the American Revolutionary War, Independence Day celebrations often included baked beans.

Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food; most are made from haricot beans (aka navy beans) in sauce. They may be eaten hot or cold, and straight from the can, as they are fully cooked. H. J. Heinz began producing canned baked beans in 1886. In the early 20th century, canned baked beans gained international popularity, particularly in the United Kingdom, where they have become a common part of an English full breakfast.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans. The small one is glazed with the letters “Boston Baked Beans”

According to chef and food historian Walter Staib of Philadelphia’s City Tavern, baked beans had their roots as a Native peoples dish in the Americas long before the dish became known to Western culture. Native Americans mixed beans, maple sugar, and bear fat in earthenware pots which they placed in pits called “bean holes” which were lined in hot rocks to cook slowly over a long period of time.

British colonists in New England were the first westerners to adopt the dish from the Native peoples, and were quick to embrace it largely because the dish was reminiscent of pease porridge and because the dish used ingredients native to the New World. They substituted molasses or sugar for the maple syrup, bacon or ham for the bear fat, and simmered their beans for hours in pots over the fire instead of underground. Each colony in America had its own regional variations of the dish, with navy or white pea beans used in Massachusetts, Jacob’s Cattle and soldier beans used in Maine, and yellow-eyed beans in Vermont.[4] This variation likely resulted from the colonists receiving the dish from different Native peoples who used different native beans.

While some historians have theorized that baked beans had originated from the cassoulet or bean stew tradition in Southern France, this is unlikely as the beans used to make baked beans are all native to South America and were introduced to Europe around 1528. However, it is likely that English colonists used their knowledge of cassoulet cooking to modify the cooking technique of the beans from the traditional Native American version, by soaking the bean overnight and simmering the beans over a fire before baking it in earthen pots in order to decrease the cooking time.

A dish which was a clear precursor to baked beans, entitled “beans and bacon”, was known in medieval England. The addition of onion and mustard to some baked beans recipes published in New England in the 19th century was likely based on traditional cassoulet recipes from Staffordshire, England which utilized mustard, beans, and leeks. These ingredients are still often added to baked beans today. Nineteenth-century cookbooks published in New England, spread to other portions of the United States and Canada, which familiarized other people with the dish.

Beans on toast

While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally dried beans were soaked overnight, simmered until tender (parboiled), and then slow-baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. Originally baked beans were sweetened with maple syrup by Native Americans, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists modified the sweetening agent to brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century the convention of using American made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular in order to avoid British taxes on sugar. The molasses style of baked beans has become closely associated with the city of Boston and is often referred to as Boston baked beans.

Today in the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston), and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish. The results of the dish, commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish- or reddish-tinted white bean, however, cooked are the same.

A tradition in Maine of “bean hole” cooking may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit and allowed to burn down to hot coals, and then a pot with 11 pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt, and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, served at every meal.

While baked beans was initially a New England region cuisine, the dish has become a popular item throughout the United States; and is now a staple item served most frequently along various types of barbecue and at picnics. This is due in part to the ease of handling, as they can be served hot or cold, directly from the can, making them handy for outdoor eating. The tomato-based sweet sauce also complements many types of barbecue. The already-cooked beans may also be baked in a casserole dish topped with slices of raw bacon, which is baked until the bacon is cooked. Additional seasonings are sometimes used, such as additional brown sugar or mustard to make the sauce more tangy.

 

A bowl of Beanie Weenies, also known as Franks and Beans or Beans and Wieners

Canned beans, often containing pork, were among the first convenience foods, and were exported and popularised by U.S. companies internationally in the early 20th century. The American Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996: “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” The included pork is typically a piece of salt pork that adds fat to the dish.

The first mass-produced commercial canning of baked beans in the United States began in 1895 by the Pennsylvania-based H. J. Heinz Company. Heinz was also the first company to sell baked beans outside of the United States, beginning with sales limited solely to Fortnum & Mason in 1886, when the item was considered a luxury. They began selling baked beans throughout the UK in 1901, and baked beans became a standard part of the English full breakfast soon after. Heinz removed pork from the product during the Second World War rationing.

Originally, Heinz baked beans were prepared in the traditional United States manner for sales in Ireland and Great Britain. Over time, the recipe was altered to a less sweet tomato sauce without maple syrup, molasses, or brown sugar to appeal to the tastes of the United Kingdom. This is the version of baked beans most commonly eaten outside of the United States. Baked beans are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English, Scottish, or Irish breakfast.

Today, baked beans are a staple convenience food in the UK, often eaten as part of the modern full English breakfast and particularly on toast (called simply “beans on toast”). Heinz Baked Beans remains the best-selling brand in the UK. The Baked Bean Museum of Excellence in Port Talbot, Wales, is dedicated to baked beans.

 

In 2002, the British Dietetic Association allowed manufacturers of canned baked beans to advertise the product as contributing to the recommended daily consumption of five to six vegetables per person. This concession was criticized by heart specialists, who pointed to the high levels of sugar and salt in the product. However, it has been proven that consumption of baked beans does indeed lower total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, even in normo-cholesterolaemic individuals. Some manufacturers produce a “healthy” version of the product with reduced levels of sugar and salt.

Healthy BBQ and Grilling Recipes

June 28, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in EatingWell | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy BBQ and Grilling Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy BBQ and Grilling Recipes with recipes including Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad Wrap, Grilled Shrimp Tostadas, and Grilled Red Snapper. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy BBQ and Grilling Recipes
Find healthy, delicious BBQ and grilling recipes including burgers, seafood, chicken and vegetables. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad Wrap
This chicken Caesar salad wrap recipe is elevated by the irresistible smoky flavor of grilled chicken and grilled romaine. Whisk together this easy Caesar salad dressing, toss with the grilled chicken and romaine and wrap it all together for a delicious lunch or dinner……

Grilled Shrimp Tostadas
Grilling gives these shrimp tostadas a boost of smoky flavor. Skewering the shrimp prevents them from falling through the grates while getting even char on each side. If you have a grill basket, you can throw them in that instead; just make sure to get them into a single layer so they don’t steam……

Grilled Red Snapper
This simple grilled snapper has clean flavors and a nice char flavor from the grill. It’s well seasoned but not overly spicy. Serve along with grilled veggies or a fresh green salad to make it a meal……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy BBQ and Grilling Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18260/cooking-methods-styles/bbq-grilling/

One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue Sandwich

May 23, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A barbecue sandwich served with pickled cucumber

A barbecue sandwich is a sandwich that is typically prepared with barbecued meats. Several types of meats are used to prepare barbecue sandwiches. Some varieties use cooked meats that are not barbecued, but include barbecue sauce. Many variations, including regional variations, exist, along with diverse types of cooking styles, preparations and ingredients.

A plethora of meats and preparation styles for barbecue sandwiches exist. Meats may be sliced, chopped or pulled, and various types are used, such as pork, pulled pork, pork shoulder, beef, beef brisket, chicken, sausage, pork ribs and turkey. Some versions use slow-smoked meats. Barbecue sandwiches typically have barbecue sauce included in their preparation, either when the meat is cooked, as a sauce within a sandwich, or both. Some meats may be seasoned with a spice rub. Some barbecue sandwiches may use cooked meats that are not barbecued, but include a barbecue sauce. Coleslaw is sometimes served with barbecue sandwiches, either on the sandwich itself or as a side dish. Sometimes sautéed vegetables such as onion and garlic are also used. Some versions prepared with beef brisket include both lean and fatty portions from the cut of beef to enhance their flavor. Pre-packaged barbecue sandwiches are also manufactured.

Breads used in the preparation of barbecue sandwiches include white bread, hamburger buns, whole wheat bread and even rye bread. The bread can help to prevent the meat from drying and to retain its temperature.

A pulled pork barbecue sandwich

Regional variations

Missouri – Kansas City-style barbecue refers to the specific regional barbecue style of slowly smoked meat that first started from the pit of Henry Perry in the early 1900s in Kansas City, Missouri. Kansas City barbecue is slow-smoked over a variety of woods and then covered with a thick tomato- and molasses-based sauce.

North Carolina – Chopped pork barbecue sandwiches with coleslaw served on the sandwich are common in North Carolina. The term “barbecue” in North Carolina commonly refers specifically to barbecued, chopped pork, whereas other barbecued foods are often referred to by their actual food name.

Tennessee – Chopped pork shoulder barbecue sandwiches served with coleslaw atop them are common in Memphis, Tennessee. For example, Leonard Heuberger, who in 1922 founded a barbecue restaurant in Memphis named Leonard’s, has been reputed there as being the inventor of the “classic Memphis pork barbecue sandwich”. This sandwich was prepared on a bun with chopped or pulled pork shoulder meat, a tomato-based sauce, and coleslaw. In the book Southern Food: At Home, on the Road, in History, it is stated that other restaurants “followed suit” regarding this sandwich style, and that “…the standard has not changed in more than 60 years.” At the Memphis restaurant chain Tops, pork shoulder sandwiches are described in this book as a “mainstay” that have existed as such since 1952, when the first Tops restaurant opened.

A barbecue sandwich, served with a side of smoked beans

Texas – Texas Barbecue is a traditional style of preparing meat unique to the cuisine of Texas. It is one of the many different varieties of barbecue found around the world. Texas barbecue traditions can be divided into four general styles: East Texas, Central Texas, South Texas, and West Texas. The Central and East Texas varieties are generally the most well-known.
Generally speaking, the different Texas barbecue styles are distinguished as follows:
* East Texas style: The meat is slowly cooked to the point that it is “falling off the bone.” It is typically cooked over hickory wood and marinated in a sweet, tomato-based sauce.
* Central Texas style: The meat is rubbed with spices and cooked over indirect heat from pecan or oak wood.
* West Texas style: The meat is cooked over direct heat from mesquite wood.
* South Texas style: Features thick, molasses-like sauces that keep the meat very moist.

One of America’s Favorites – Short Ribs

April 25, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Flanken cut short ribs.

Short ribs are a cut of beef taken from the brisket, chuck, plate, or rib areas of beef cattle. They consist of a short portion of the rib bone, which is overlain by meat which varies in thickness. There are two major types of cuts: The “flanken”, which is cut across the bone and leaves the bone just 1 to 2 inches in length, or even less and the “English”, which is cut parallel to the bone and leaves the bone up to 6 inches in length. English cut short ribs may be served individually, or three or four may served connected to one another (a style known as the “plate”). Short ribs are popular in many international cuisines.

Meatpacking executive Richard C. Banfield notes that the term “short ribs” comes from the fact that the cut of meat contains only a portion of each long beef rib.

Using American butcher’s nomenclature, short ribs may be taken from the brisket, chuck, plate, or rib areas of beef cattle.

The serratus ventralis muscle defines the area in the beef carcass from where short ribs come, and is the preferred muscle tissue for short ribs. This muscle originates near the second rib, and covers most of the rib cage. In the chuck area (second through fifth ribs), the muscle is much thicker. Moving toward the rump, the serratus ventralis becomes less dense, and may not cover the entire rib. Outside of the chuck, the serratus ventralis covers the entire rib with a degree of thickness only in the plate area. Over ribs nine through 12, the serratus ventralis is too thin to properly create a true short rib, and meat here is usually turned into a “Royal short rib” or else stripped from the bone and used for ground beef.

The latissimus dorsi muscle lies atop the serratus ventralis muscle, and is separated from it by a layer of fat. This muscle is generally found in the chuck area and the upper portion (toward the spine) of the plate. It adds thickness to chuck and rib short ribs, but is less prized by chefs than the serratus ventralis muscle.

Chuck short ribs tend to be meatier than the other two types of ribs, but they are also tougher due to the more extensive connective tissues (collagen and reticulin) in them. Plate short ribs tend to be fattier than the other two types.

Short ribs cut from the rib area near the spine (the dorsal area) are better known as “back ribs” or “dinosaur ribs”. They consist of what remains of the rib in this area after the rib chop is removed. Due to the thinness of the serratus ventralis here, the meat on these ribs is generally intercostal muscle (e.g., the muscle between each rib).

Beef Short Ribs Bone In

Short ribs, by definition, are not the entire length of rib. When the rib bone is cut into a 3-to-6-inch length, left as a section of meat (a “plate”) containing three or four ribs or cut into individual ribs with meat attached, the short rib is known as an “English cut”. They may also be known as barbecue ribs, braising ribs, or fancy cut ribs. A section of short ribs from the plate (ribs six through eight, with their intercostal muscle) is known as a “short plate”. Rib short ribs are almost always sold as a plate.

When the carcass is cut across the bone to create strips of meat with multiple rib bones, the short rib is known as a “flanken cut.” These may also be known as crosscut ribs, Eastern European-style ribs, Hawaiian-style ribs, Jewish ribs, Korean-style ribs, or “kosher ribs”. Flanken-cut short ribs incorporate at least two rib bones, and are often no more than 1 to 2 inches thick.

Retail meat shops often do not differentiate between short ribs which come from the brisket, chuck, plate, and rib. In the United States, short ribs from the plate are generally the least expensive cut, followed by medium-priced short ribs from the brisket and chuck, and premium-priced short ribs from the rib area.

Beef short ribs are the equivalent of spare ribs in pork, with beef short ribs usually larger and meatier than pork spare ribs.

“Boneless” short ribs are cut from either the chuck or plate, and consist of rib meat separated from the bone. “Boneless country-style short ribs”, however, are not true short ribs. They are found primarily in the United States, and are cut from the chuck eye roll (serving as a less expensive alternative to rib steak).

A specific type of short rib dish which originated in Hawaii is known as Maui-style ribs. In this dish, flanken-cut ribs are marinated in soy sauce, brown sugar, and ginger, and then swiftly grilled.

One of America’s Favorites – Pork Ribs

April 11, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Balinese roasted pork ribs

Pork ribs are a cut of pork popular in North American and Asian cuisines. The ribcage of a domestic pig, meat and bones together, is cut into usable pieces, prepared by smoking, grilling, or baking – usually with a sauce, often barbecue – and then served.

 

 

 

 

Cuts of pork ribs

Baby back ribs served with fries and cornbread

Several different types of ribs are available, depending on the section of rib cage from which they are cut. Variation in the thickness of the meat and bone, as well as levels of fat in each cut, can alter the flavor and texture of the prepared dish. The inner surface of the rib cage is covered by a layer of connective tissue (pleura) that is difficult to cook tender; it is usually removed before marinating or cooking.

* Baby back ribs (also back ribs or loin ribs) are taken from the top of the rib cage between the spine and the spare ribs, below the loin muscle. They have meat between the bones and on top of the bones, and are shorter, curved, and sometimes meatier than spare ribs. The rack is shorter at one end, due to the natural tapering of a pig’s rib cage. The shortest bones are typically only about 3 in (7.6 cm) and the longest is usually about 6 in (15 cm), depending on the size of the hog. A pig side has 15 to 16 ribs (depending on the breed), but usually two or three are left on the shoulder when it is separated from the loin. So, a rack of back ribs contains a minimum of eight ribs (some may be trimmed if damaged), but can include up to 13 ribs, depending on how it has been prepared by the butcher. A typical commercial rack has 10–13 bones. If fewer than 10 bones are present, butchers call them “cheater racks”.

* Spare ribs, also called “spareribs” or “side ribs”, are taken from the belly side of the rib cage, below the section of back ribs and above the sternum (breast bone). Spare ribs are flatter and contain more bone than meat, but more fat that can make the ribs more tender than back ribs. The term “spare ribs” is a Middle English corruption (via “sparrib”) of “rippspeer”, a Low German term that referred to racks of meat being roasted on a turning spit.
* St. Louis style ribs (or St. Louis cut spare ribs) have had the sternum bone, cartilage, and rib tips (see below) removed. The shape is almost rectangular.
* Kansas City style ribs are trimmed less closely than the St. Louis style ribs, and have the hard bone removed.

Rib tips

Spare ribs cut into riblets with Chinese barbecue sauce

Rib tips are short, meaty sections of rib attached to the lower end of the spare ribs, between the ribs and the sternum. Unlike back ribs or spare ribs, the structure of the rib is provided by dense costal cartilage, not bone. Rib tips are cut away from the spare ribs when preparing St. Louis style spare ribs.

Riblets
Riblets are prepared by butchers by cutting a full set of spare ribs approximately in half. This produces a set of short, flat ribs where the curved part of the rib is removed and gives them a more uniform look. Loin back ribs don’t always have this removed. When not removed they have a rounded look to them and are often referred to as baby back ribs. Another product (imprecisely) called riblets is actually the transverse processes of the lumbar vertebrae. Riblets used to be thrown out by butchers, but have become popular due to their excellent flavor and lower cost.

Button ribs (or feather bones) are often confused with riblets mostly because Applebee’s sells these as “riblets”. In fact, what Applebee’s sells is found just past the ribs near the back bone, just underneath the tenderloin. This cut of meat actually has no bones, but instead has “buttons” of cartilaginous material with meat attached.

Rib tips (or brisket) are found at the bottom of the spare ribs by the sternum. The rib tips have a high proportion of cartilage. The rib tips give the spare ribs a rounded appearance. In an attempt to give the meat a more uniform appearance and make it easier to eat, this piece is sometimes removed, and the remaining spare ribs are referred to as Saint Louis style ribs.

Other cuts and preparations

* Button ribs are flat, circular-shaped bones located at the sirloin end of the loin. They are not actually ribs, as they are not taken from the rib cage. The button ribs consist of the

Smoked country style pork ribs

last four to six bones on the backbone; they do not have actual ribs connected to them. The meat on the button ribs consists of meat that covers each button and connects them together.
* Country-style ribs are cut from the blade end of the loin close to the pork shoulder. They are meatier than other rib cuts. They contain no rib bones, but instead contain parts of the shoulder blade (scapula).
* Rib roast (or bone-in pork loin rib roast, bone-in loin rib roast, center cut rib roast, prime rib of pork, standing rib roast) is a whole pork loin with the back ribs attached. They can be up to 2 ft long and 6 in thick. They are sold whole or in sections.
* Rib chops are pork steaks or chops that include a back rib bone and the loin meat attached. They are lean and tender.
* Rib patties – The meat from the ribs is taken off the bone and ground to make rib patties. McDonald’s McRib patties contain pork meat mostly from non-rib sections of the hog.
* Christmas ribs – About half of Norwegian families eat oven-cooked rib at Christmas Eve. Normally, they are referred to as ribbe or juleribbe. Traditional recipes include steaming half an hour before cooking in the oven to achieve a crisp surface.

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Kansas City Barbeque Turkey  

March 18, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is Kansas City Barbeque Turkey. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing JENNIE-O® Applewood Smoke Flavor Turkey Breast Tenderloin, Low Sodium BBQ Sauce, Kaiser Style Buns, Coleslaw, and Pickles. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Stay Safe and Make the SWITCH in 2022!   https://www.jennieo.com/

Kansas City Barbeque Turkey
This isn’t your ordinary barbeque sandwich. This Kansas City Barbeque Turkey sandwich is a nutritious alternative of the classic BBQ sandwich without compromising taste. At 360 calories, this sandwich is super kid-friendly.

Total Time – 4 Hours 20 Minutes
Serving Size – 6 Servings

Ingredients
1 – (24-ounce) JENNIE-O® Applewood Smoke Flavor Turkey Breast Tenderloin

1 – cup low-sodium barbeque sauce

6 – Kaiser-style buns, split

coleslaw and pickles, if desired

Directions
1) Prepare grill for medium heat. Cook turkey on greased grill 20 minutes, turning occasionally.

2) Place turkey in slow cooker on High 4 hours or until turkey is very tender and will easily pull apart. Always cook until well done, 165°F. as measured by meat thermometer.

3) Using forks, pull turkey apart. Add sauce; stir to coat.

4) Pile turkey onto buns. Serve with coleslaw and pickles, if desired.

Nutrition
Calories – 360
Protein – 26g
Carbohydrates – 51g
Fiber – 2g
Sugars – 16g
Fat -3.5g
Cholesterol – 50mg
Sodium – 830mg
Saturated Fat – 1g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/kansas-city-barbeque-turkey/

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PoPo Pigs Out

Cook. Eat. Share.

Millennial Cooks

Cooking and baking within a gluten-free and flexible dieting lifestyle

Married for the Meals

for the love of good food

Nimble Veggies

Fast Vegetarian Recipes From Around the World

Eden Recipes

Plant-based, whole-foods, (mostly) gluten-free

I Didn't H(ate) That

Culinary (Mis)adventures with an Enthusiastic Amateur

The Radish Room

totally RAD food

Buzymum

All Things Family, Health, Fitness, Education and Lifestyle

My Life and Spice

A journey of life, through food, family and travel.

Simple SIBO Recipes

SIBO Specific Diet Friendly Recipe Blog

The Columbo Game

... just one more thing.