One of America’s Favorites – Pig Pickin’

July 17, 2017 at 4:53 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A pig pickin’ (also known as rolling a pig, pig pull, pig roast or, among the Cajun, “cochon de lait”) is a type of party or gathering held primarily in the American South which involves the barbecuing of a whole hog (the castrated male pig or barrow, bred for consumption at about 12 weeks old). Females, or gilts, are used as well. Boars (full-grown intact males) and sows generally are too large.

Many Southern families have a pig roast for Thanksgiving or Christmas, graduations, weddings, or summer gatherings. Some communities hold cook-offs during festivals, where cooks compete against one another for prize money.

 

A pig, often around 80–120 pounds dressed weight, is split in half and spread onto a large charcoal or propane grill. Some practitioners use a separate stove filled with hardwood to produce coals which are then transferred under the charcoal grill by shovel; others use charcoal with chunks of either blackjack oak, hickory wood or some other hardwood added for flavor. The style of these grills are as varied as the methods of producing them, some being homemade while others are custom-made.

There is a long-running debate among barbecue enthusiasts over the merits of different fuels. Propane is said to maintain a consistent temperature, whereas charcoal or charwood are often touted as producing better-tasting meat.

The cooking process is communal and usually directed by an authority figure; the host is helped by friends or family. It usually takes four to eight hours to cook the pig completely; the pig is often started “meat-side” down, and then is flipped one time once the hog has stopped dripping rendered fat. Some practitioners clean ashes from the skin with paper towels or a small whisk broom before flipping the hog to help produce high quality cracklings from the skin.

Often the hog is basted while cooking, though the method and sauce used differs according to region. For instance, a typical South Carolina Piedmont-area baste would be a mustard based sauce, an Eastern North Carolina baste is usually a very light vinegar based sauce with red pepper flakes, and Western North Carolina barbecue uses sauce with a ketchup base similar to traditional barbecue sauce.

When the cooking is complete, the meat should ideally be tender to the point of falling off of the bone. The meat is then either chopped or pulled into traditional Carolina-style pork barbecue, or it is picked off the hog itself by the guests. It is from the latter that the gathering gains its name. The barbecue is sometimes eaten with hushpuppies (fried cornmeal, occasionally flavored with onions), coleslaw, baked beans or sometimes Brunswick stew. In South Carolina, it is common to serve pilaf or hash as a side dish. Hash is a blend of leftover pork mixed with barbecue sauce and usually served over rice.

Sweet tea, beer, and soft drinks are often served.

 

The pig pickin’ is a significant part of the culture of the South; the necessary work and time needed to cook the hog makes it ideal for church gatherings (“dinner on the grounds”) or family reunions, and they can be held virtually year-round thanks to the region’s mild winters. Pig pickin’s are popular amongst the most devoted tailgaters at college football games across the South. The pig pickin’ has been long associated with politics; many local political parties and politicians still use the pig pickin’ to attract people to meetings and campaign rallies.[citation needed] In 1983, Rufus Edmisten, running for Governor of North Carolina at the time, was overheard saying “I’ve eaten enough barbecue. I am not going to eat any more. I’m taking my stand and that is it.”

Culturally and culinarily different from traditional Deep South pig pickin’ events, pig roasts are a common occurrence in Cuba, as well as the non-mainland American state of Hawaii, with roasts being done in the traditions of those places.

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

August 17, 2015 at 5:14 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans is a dish containing beans, sometimes baked but, despite the name, usually stewed, in a sauce. Most commercial canned baked beans are made from haricot beans, also known as navy beans – a variety of Phaseolus vulgaris in a sauce. In Ireland and the United Kingdom, a tomato and sugar sauce is most commonly used, and they are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English breakfast.

American Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, the popularity of which has led to the city being nicknamed “Beantown”. Beans in a tomato and brown sugar, sugar or corn syrup sauce are a widely available type throughout the US. Canada’s Quebec-style beans often use maple syrup. This style is also popular in states bordering Canada’s Eastern provinces.

Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food. They may be eaten hot or cold straight from the can as they are fully cooked.

Baked beans are also sometimes served with chips, waffles, or the like.

 
The beans presently used to make baked beans are all native to North America and were introduced to Italy in 1528 and to France by 1547. The dish of baked beans is commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish or reddish tinted white bean once baked, stewed, canned or otherwise cooked. According to alternative traditions, sailors brought cassoulet from the south of France or northern France and the Channel Islands where bean stews were popular. Most probably, a number of regional bean recipes coalesced and cross-fertilised in North America and ultimately gave rise to the baked bean culinary tradition familiar today.

While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally beans were slow baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. A tradition in Maine, USA, of “bean hole” cooking, may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit, allowed to burn down to hot coals and then a pot with eleven pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, being served at every meal.

Canned beans, often with pork, were among the first convenience foods and it is in this form that they became exported and popularised by US companies operating in the UK in the early 20th century. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996 that “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” This is typically a piece of salt pork to add fat to the dish.

Canned baked beans with small pork sausages are still available, as are variants with other added ingredients such as chilli.

 

 

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans.

In the United States, Bush’s (Bush Brothers and Company), Van Camp’s, B&M (Burnham & Morrill Inc.), Allens, Inc., the H. J. Heinz Company, and the Campbell’s Soup Company are well-known producers or brands of packaged baked beans. B&M specializes in Boston-style baked beans often sold in beanpot-shaped jars, and canned brown bread, a traditional regional accompaniment to baked beans, whereas Bush and Van Camp produce multiple flavor varieties of canned beans, some styles using cured bacon to flavor the products.
In the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston), and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish.

In southern states and along the eastern seaboard of the US, the beans become tangier usually due to the addition of yellow mustard. For example, the baked beans of Tennessee-based Bush’s include mustard in most of their varieties of beans. Ground beef may also become common alongside bacon in the home versions some of these bean styles. They may take on a flavor similar to Cowboy Beans, a home-mixed stew, somewhat similar to a chili but made instead with sweet baked beans.

Baked beans are a staple side dish for various types of barbecue. This is due in part to the ease of handling, as they can be served hot or cold, directly from the can, making them handy for outdoor eating. The tomato-based sweet sauce also complements many types of barbecue. The already-cooked beans may also be baked in a casserole dish topped with slices of raw bacon, which is baked until the bacon is cooked. Additional seasonings are sometimes used, such as additional brown sugar or mustard to make the sauce more tangy.

Heinz baked beans became very successful as an export to the UK, where canned baked beans are now a staple food. In America, the H. J. Heinz Co. continue to sell baked beans, although they are not always as widely distributed as competing American brands. Despite their international fame, there are currently substantial differences between the Heinz baked beans produced for the UK market (descended from the original American recipe) and the nearest currently equivalent American product (Heinz Premium Vegetarian Beans).

Beans on toast

Beans on toast

The American product contains brown sugar where the British beans do not, and the US product contains 14 g of sugar per 16 oz tin compared to 7 g for the British version (equating to 140 versus 90 calories). The US beans have a mushier texture and are darker in color than their UK counterpart. This has resulted in a situation where the product is now imported back to the brand’s home country. For several years, UK Heinz Baked Beans have been available in the US, either in different-sized cans from those sold in the UK or in a 385-gram can (the same can as the 415-gram can in the UK) with an “export” label with American English spelling and the word “baked” dropped from the title on the label. These are sold in many US specialty stores, attesting to the popularity of baked beans and their appeal to expats. Bush, Van Camp, B&M, and Heinz all produce pork-free baked beans labeled as vegetarian beans, making this American dish available to people who abstain from pork for religious, dietary, or ethical reasons.

 
In 2002 the British Dietetic Association allowed manufacturers of canned baked beans to advertise the product as contributing to the recommended daily consumption of five – six vegetables per person. This concession was criticised by heart specialists who pointed to the high levels of sugar and salt in the product. However, it has been proven that consumption of baked beans does indeed lower total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, even in normo-cholesterolaemic individuals. Some manufacturers produce a “healthy” version of the product with reduced levels of sugar and salt.

Flatulence
Baked beans are known on occasion to cause a considerable increase in flatulence following consumption; this is due to the fermentation of polysaccharides (specifically oligosaccharides) by gut flora, specifically Methanobrevibacter smithii. The oligosaccharides pass through the small intestine largely unchanged, and when they reach the large intestine, bacteria feast on them, producing copious amounts of flatus. This condition is the basis for the US children’s song “Beans, Beans, the Musical Fruit” or, in the UK, “Beans, Beans, Good for the Heart”. One of the more prominent examples of the phenomenon, in popular culture, is the campfire scene in Mel Brooks’s film Blazing Saddles, in which the cowboys’ banter is punctuated by fusillades of flatulence—an early instance of the potty humor later popularized by moviemakers like the Farrelly brothers, and a red flag to censors at the time.

 

Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots,

December 23, 2013 at 6:38 PM | Posted in carrots, chicken, greenbeans, Perdue Chicken Products, potatoes | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots, and Baked Harvest Grain Bread

 

 

 

Mid 50’s the last couple of days and now the mid 30’s with a wind chill in the 20’s! Welcome to Ohio Winters! Dropped off a couple of gifts to my Cousin and after that sofa city, with the remote of course. For dinner tonight I prepared a (Perdue) Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots, Baked Harvest Grain Bread.

 

Perdue Oven Ready Whole Chicken Breast 003

 

I used one my favorite ways to prepare Roasted Chicken, the Perdue Oven Ready Chickens! As it says “Oven Ready’, already seasoned, and little clean-up needed plus their always delicious. To prepare it just preheat the oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up. Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. If cooking from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF. Comes out piping hot and delicious! Plenty leftovers!

 

 

 

For one side dish I heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and Potatoes. I really like using the Del Monte Cut Green Beans and New Potatoes, contains 2 of my favorite vegetables (Green Beans and Potatoes). Then I also heated up some Sliced Carrots and we had slices of Klosterman Wheat Bread. I also opened up a couple of small cans of Mixed Fruit Cocktail for Mom and Dad. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Frozen Vanilla Bean Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

PERDUE® OVEN READY Whole Seasoned Roaster Bone-In Breast (3 lbs.)
Deliciously seasoned and juicy, whole bone-in chicken breast. Oven ready for convenience. Cooks perfectly in the bag for easy clean up.
INGREDIENTS
*Ingredients: Chicken, water, salt, potassium and sodium phosphates, brown sugar, dextrose, carrageenan, yeast extract, maltodextrin, natural flavor.

*Seasoning Ingredients: Dextrose, modified food starch, onion, maltodextrin, natural flavor, garlic, cottonseed oil, dried carrot, xanthan gum, dried parsley, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, carrageenan.
PRODUCT HANDLING
Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave. Cook thoroughly.
**If breast temperature is below 180ºF, return to oven and continue cooking, checking the temperature every 10 minutes until the temperature reaches 180ºF.

COOKING AND PREP
• Preheat oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up.
• Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. Note: Cooking bag will expand during cooking; allow enough room for the bag to expand without touching oven rack or walls.
• Cook from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Cook from Frozen: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oen and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes. Cut open cooking bag (use care to avoid hot steam and juices) and transfer breast to serving plate or cutting board. Remaining juices in bag can be used for a delicious seasoned gravy.

 

Nutrion Facts:

Serving Size 4oz (112g)
Servings Per Container about 11
Amount Per Serving (* % of Daily Value)
Calories 170
Calories from Fat 80
Total Fat 9g (14%)
Saturated Fat 2.5g (13%)
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 60mg (20%)
Sodium 360mg (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 0g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0g (0%)
Sugars 0g
Protein 20g

 
http://www.perdue.com/products/details.asp?id=455&title=PERDUE%AE%20OVEN%20READY%20Whole%20Seasoned%20Roaster%20Bone-In%20Breast%20(3%20lbs.)

Buffalo Terres Major Fillet w/ Sauteed Mushrooms, Green Beans, and Baked Potato

December 9, 2013 at 6:24 PM | Posted in greenbeans, mushrooms, potatoes, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Buffalo Terres Major Fillet w/ Sauteed Mushrooms, Green Beans, and Baked Potato

 

Buffalo Terris Major 001

 

About 33 degrees this morning but it’s been dropping ever since. Went to the store early to pick up a few items and then had to take my Dad to the Doctor, he has a lot of heavy congestion. Not good for a person that’s 92. They took some x-rays and waiting for the results tomorrow to see exactly what it is. For dinner tonight I prepared a Wild Idea Buffalo Terres Major Fillet w/ Sauteed Mushrooms, Green Beans, and Baked Potato.

 

 

 

This is always the tenderest cut of Buffalo Steak I can find, and one of the most delicious cuts also! I pan fried it in Canola Oil about 4 minutes per side, which gives you a perfect medium rare! The steak is so tender with just an incredible flavor. As with all the Wild Idea Buffalo cuts it has a slight sweet taste and so tender a knife isn’t really needed!

 

 

 

For a side dish I made some Sauteed Mushrooms. I’ve been using Green Giant Sliced Mushrooms. Really like these, nice taste and keeps so good in a jar. I sautéed them in Extra Virgin olive Oil and a pat of I Can’t Believe It’s not Butter and seasoned with Sea Salt, Ground Roasted Cumin, Parsley Flakes, and Dried Thyme. I also heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and had a Baked Potato. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Vanilla Bean Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

Wild Idea BuffaloTerres-Major-Filet_grande

 

 
Wild Idea Buffalo 8 oz. Terres Major Fillet

The second most tender cut on the animal. This treasured cut is found in the chuck shoulder.

 
http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/collections/a-la-carte/products/terres-major-filet

Fried Walleye w/ Au Gratin Potato Casserole, Green Beans, and…

November 21, 2013 at 6:07 PM | Posted in fish, greenbeans, Idahoan Potato Products | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Fried Walleye w/ Au Gratin Potato Casserole, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread.

 

Fried Walleye 004

 

Long night and day, dealing with a sinus infection. Every time there’s a shift in the weather my sinuses let me know! High of only in the 20’s coming this weekend they say. Our new microwave came in, just waiting to have it installed above the stove. For dinner tonight I prepared Fried Walleye w/ Au Gratin Potato Casserole, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread

 

 

 

I had bought a couple of large Walleye Fillets while at Costco yesterday. I cut one up and froze it and cut the other one into smaller Fried Walleye 001Fillets and prepared them for dinner. After cutting it up into smaller Fillets I rinsed them off in cold water and patted dry with paper towel. Seasoned them with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper. Put them in a Hefty Plastic Bag and added some Progresso Italian Style Bread Crumbs, sealed the bag and shook till all fillets were well coated. I then fried them in Canola Oil on medium heat, about 3 to 4 minutes per side till golden brown! love Walleye, as I do most Fish. With Crappie their my favorite Fresh Water Fish to eat. Everyone agreed that was some of the freshest tasting Walleye I had ever purchased, so good job Costco!

 

 

 

Then for one side dish I baked a Idahoan Homestyle Au Gratin Potato Casserole. Hard to beat the Idahoan Potato Casseroles, easy to prepare and all come out delicious! I also heated up a can of Del Monte Low Sodium Cut Green Beans and a couple of slices of buttered Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Double Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

Idahoan Homestyle Au Gratin Potato CasseroleIdahoan Au Graten
There’s no better way to start a savory Au Gratin Homestyle Casserole than with world-famous Idaho® potatoes, which is why you’ll taste only 100% grown-in-Idaho potatoes in this rich & cheesy side. For family meals or for special occasions, this cheesy, delicious dish is sure to please.
Oven Directions
Best for Golden Browning
PREHEAT oven to 450°F. COMBINE potatoes and sauce mix in 1 1/2 quart baking dish.
STIR in 1 1/2 cups boiling water, 3/4 cup milk, and 1 1/2 Tbsp. margarine or butter with whisk.
BAKE uncovered for 25 minutes or until top is golden brown and potatoes are tender (sauce will thicken slightly when cooling).
Remove from oven and let stand a few minutes before serving.
BAKING NOTES: To prepare 2 casseroles at once, double all ingredients, increase baking dish size accordingly, and bake about 30 min. To bake potatoes and roast meat at the same time, bake at 375°F for about 45 min; 350°F for about 50 min; or 325°F for about 60 min.
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 2/3 cup mix (29 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 110

Calories from Fat 13

Total Fat 1.5g 2%

Sodium 690mg 29%

Carbohydrates 20.0g 7%

Dietary Fiber 2.0g 8%

Sugars 2.0g

Protein 3.0g

 

http://idahoan.com/products/au-gratin-homestyle-casserole/

One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

July 8, 2013 at 8:39 AM | Posted in bacon, baking, BBQ, beans, One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Baked beans is a dish containing beans, sometimes baked but, despite the name, usually stewed, in a sauce. Most commercial canned

Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

baked beans are made from haricot beans, also known as navy beans – a variety of Phaseolus vulgaris in a sauce. In Ireland and the United Kingdom, a tomato and sugar sauce is most commonly used. They are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English breakfast.
In the United States there are multiple styles. Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, the popularity of which has led to the city being nicknamed “Beantown“. Beans in a tomato and brown sugar, sugar or corn syrup sauce are a widely available type throughout the US. Maine and Quebec-style beans often use maple syrup.
Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food, shortening cooking times for a meal, or may be eaten straight from the can, in camping or emergency settings, as they are fully cooked. They are sometimes served with chips, waffles, or the like.

 

 

The beans used to make baked beans are all native to North America and were introduced to Italy in 1528 and to France by 1547. The dish of baked beans is commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish or reddish tinted white bean once baked, stewed, canned or otherwise cooked. According to alternative traditions, sailors brought cassoulet from the south of France or northern France and the Channel Islands where bean stews were popular. Most probably, a number of regional bean recipes coalesced and cross-fertilised in North America and ultimately gave rise to the baked bean culinary tradition familiar today.
While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally beans were slow baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. A tradition in Maine, USA, of “bean hole” cooking, may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit, allowed to burn down to hot coals and then a pot with eleven pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, being served at every meal.
Canned beans, often with pork, were among the first convenience foods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996 that “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” This is typically a piece of salt pork to add fat to the dish

 

 

 

In the UK, Ireland, Hong Kong and Singapore the term baked beans refers almost exclusively to canned beans in a tomato sauce.

Heinz brand beans

Heinz brand beans

Many people regard baked beans as an integral part of the modern full English breakfast, including beans on toast. Every day 2.3 million British people eat Heinz Baked Beans; 1 million of those people eat them for dinner. Although Heinz Baked Beans have long been the biggest selling brand, other brands such as Branston Baked Beans, supermarket own brands, and HP baked beans (later purchased by Heinz), are available. Heinz baked beans were first sold in the UK in 1886 in the upmarket Fortnum & Mason store in London as an exotic import at a high price. Although they are now a staple food, the store continues the tradition of selling Heinz Beans among its more expensive wares. Baked beans are also considered to be a staple food of students, as they are typically easily heated in a microwave and are very cheap.

 

 

Metropolitan Australian and Kiwi cafes typically serve beans in a tomato sauce prepared freshly rather than canned, as the provision of canned food would be considered odd in an eating establishment. These are made with crushed tomatoes (which may or may not be peeled), smoked hock of ham, onion, garlic, and assorted spices. The beans may be of haricot, navy, borlotti & cannellini varieties. UK-style tinned baked beans are also popular for home consumption due to the quick preparation time. Wattie’s Baked Beans are considered a cultural icon for New Zealanders.

 

In the United States, Bush’s (Bush Brothers and Company), Van Camp’s, B&M (Burnham & Morrill Inc.), Allens, Inc., the H. J. Heinz Company, and the Campbell’s Soup Company are well-known producers or brands of packaged baked beans. B&M specializes in Boston-style baked beans often sold in beanpot shaped jars, and canned brown bread, a traditional regional accompaniment to baked beans; whereas Bush and Van Camp produce multiple flavor varieties of canned beans, some styles using cured bacon to add its flavorings to the products.

 

 

In the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston),

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans.

and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish.
In southern states and along the eastern seaboard of the US, the beans become tangier usually due to the addition of yellow mustard. For example the baked beans of Tennessee based Bush’s include mustard in most of their varieties of beans. Ground beef may also become common alongside bacon in the home versions some of these bean styles. They may take on a flavor similar to Cowboy Beans, a home mixed stew, somewhat similar to a chili but made instead with sweet baked beans.
Heinz baked beans became very successful as an export to the UK, where canned baked beans are now a staple food. In America, the H. J. Heinz Co. continue to sell baked beans, however, they are not always as widely distributed as competing American brands. Despite their international fame, there are currently substantial differences between the Heinz baked beans produced for the UK market (descended from the original American recipe) and the nearest currently equivalent American product (Heinz Premium Vegetarian Beans).
The American product contains brown sugar where the British beans do not, and the US product contains 14g of sugar per 16 oz tin compared to 7g for the British version (equating to 140 vs 90 calories). The US beans have a mushier texture and are darker in color than their UK counterpart. This has resulted in a situation where the product is now imported back to the brand’s home country. For several years, the UK Heinz Baked Beans have been available in the US, either in different sized cans from those sold in the UK or in a 385 gram can (the same can as the 415 gram can in the UK) with an “export” label with American English spelling and the word “baked” dropped from the title on the label. These are sold in many US specialty stores, such is the popularity of baked beans and their appeal to expats. Bush, Van Camp, B&M, and Heinz all produce pork-free baked beans labeled as vegetarian beans, making this American dish available to people who abstain from pork for religious, dietary, or ethical reasons.

 

 

Around the World:

Home made Polish baked beans fasolka po bretońsku.

Home made Polish baked beans fasolka po bretońsku.

Traditional cuisines of many regions claim such recipes as typical specialities, for example:

 

* In Iran, Loubia Garm (Hot Beans) is prepared using beans in a tomato sauce, often served in winter on stalls in streets.
* In Poland, with the addition of bacon and/or sausage these are known as Breton Beans (fasolka po bretońsku[10]).
* Jersey bean crock
* Boston baked beans
* Pork and beans, which despite the name often contain very little pork
* Guernsey Bean Jar
* Spanish Cocido Montañés
* French cassoulet
* Feijoada
* Fasolada
* Frijoles charros, pinto beans cooked with bacon and sometimes tomatoes, are popular in Mexico and the American border states.
* Greek Fasolia Gigandes Gigandes plaki
* In the Italian cuisine beans (of various size and various types) are widely used for several recipes also mixed with other ingredients: “fagiolata” generally stands for baked beans but there are also regional variations like “fagioli alla uccelletto” in Florence; “minestra di fagioli” (beans soup normally cooked with vegetables) “pasta e fagioli” (meaning “pasta and beans”).
* New England baked beans
* Quebec-style baked beans are often prepared with maple syrup.
* Bean-hole beans, traditionally from Northern New England and Quebec, cooked in a covered fire pit in the ground for up to two days
* British cuisine claims beans on toast as a teatime favourite, the combination of cereal and legume forming an inexpensive complete protein; compare rice and beans. Variations of “beans on toast deluxe” can include extras as such as egg, grated cheese, marmite, tuna etc., and baked beans sometimes form part of a full English breakfast.
* Beans cooked in barbecue sauce (or a similarly flavoured sauce) are a traditional side dish in an American barbecue.
* “Franks & beans”, a recipe wherein hot dogs are cut up and cooked in the same sauce as the baked beans. In Canada, this recipe is more commonly called “beans and wieners”.
* In Mexico and Latin America baked beans are also popular: black beans (frijoles negros) and frijoles pintos (pinto beans) are the most common.
* In the Balkans, they are known as prebranac.
* The traditional Jewish Shabbat dish cholent (also known as hamin) is made with meat, potatoes, beans and barley.
* Many unusual dishes are made with baked beans including the baked bean sandwich. These are slices of bread topped with beans and other additions, such as melted cheese.

 

 

In 2002 the British Dietetic Association allowed manufacturers of canned baked beans to advertise the product as contributing to the recommended daily consumption of five – six vegetables per person. This concession was criticised by heart specialists who pointed to the high levels of sugar and salt in the product. However, it has been proven that consumption of baked beans does indeed lower total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, even in normo-cholesterolaemic individuals. Some manufacturers produce a “healthy” version of the product with reduced levels of sugar and salt.

 

Grilled Bratwurst, Hot Dogs, Burgers w/ Grilled Mustard Potato Salad and Baked Beans

May 14, 2013 at 5:06 PM | Posted in Ball Park Smoked Turkey Franks, beans, grilling, potatoes | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Grilled Bratwurst, Hot Dogs, Burgers w/ Grilled Mustard Potato Salad and Baked Beans

 

 

A sort of cool morning turned into a beautiful Spring Day, about 75 degrees today! Perfect out, perfect fo grilling. For dinner tonight I Grilled Bratts 001grilled out for everyone, grilling Brats, Dogs, Burgers along with Grilled Mustard Potato Salad and Baked Beans.

 

 

I used Queen City Deliciously Lean Bratwurst, Ball Park Smoked White Turkey Franks, and made a couple of Burgers Patties out of some Ground Chuck for Mom and Dad. Served the everything on Aunt Millie’s Light Buns. I made a side of Mustard Potato Salad (recipe below) and Bush’s Baked Beans. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

Grilled Mustard Potato Salad
INGREDIENTS:
3 Yukon Gold potatoes, cubed
3 red potatoes, cubed
1/4 cup canola oil
3 tablespoons distilled white vinegar
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon celery salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat an outdoor grill for high heat.
2. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, and cook potatoes 10 to 15 minutes, until tender but firm. Drain, and transfer to a medium bowl.
3. In a small bowl, mix canola oil, vinegar, Dijon mustard, celery salt, and pepper. Toss 1/2 the mixture with the potatoes.
4. Arrange potatoes in a single layer on a sheet of foil, and place on the prepared grill. Turning occasionally, cook 7 to 9 minutes, until lightly browned. Remove from heat, and cool. Toss with remaining oil mixture to serve.

 

 

 
Bush’s Homestyle Baked Beans

Savor the taste of down-home flavor. Our Homestyle Baked Beans combine a tangy sauce, specially cured bacon and brown sugar to make your meal a mouth-watering success.
Homestyle Baked Beans
Serving size: 1/2 cup (130g)
Amount per size:
Calories: 140
Calories from fat: 10
% Daily Value*
2%Total Fat 1g
0%Saturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
0%Cholesterol 0mg
23%Sodium 550mg
Potassium
10%Total Carbs 29g
20%Dietary Fiber 5g
Sugars 12g
Protein 6g
http://www.bushbeans.com/en_US/products/details.jsp?upc=3940001592

 

 

 

Queen City Deliciously Lean Bratwurst
Offered in skinless and cased types, all Queen City Sausage Bratwurst are very mild sausage steam-cooked and expertly adorned with tasty spices, kicky onions, and super fresh parsley.

Plus their only 100 calories, 6 grams of Fat, and 4 carbs.

Craft sausage is made by a second-generation maker, with fresh onions, garlic, and spices that are truly from the earth. A craft sausage-maker uses authentic, time-honored recipes and only the finest ingredients available to bring them to life. A craft sausage is stuffed by sausage specialists who pour their time and artistry into their handiwork, one small batch at a time.

Queen City Sausage delivers only craft sausage. In fact, we take seriously the history of great sausage-making and are dedicated to the art and science that make it so. We are loyal to the recipes – the careful balance of spices and meats and the critical baking times, temperatures, and conditions – that make sausage first-rate. We are thoughtful in our selection of top-notch ingredients. And we are proud to be old-fashioned in our quality-driven devotion.

The result of our single-minded commitment to craft sausage-making is a line of truly superior sausages, lunchmeats, and premium ham and roast beef made by dedicated craftspeople, a collection of edible artistry. The result is delicious. The result is the best-selling craft sausage in the region. The result is Queen City Sausage.

 
http://www.queencitysausage.com/

Grilling Out Tonight!

May 18, 2012 at 5:25 PM | Posted in Food, grilling | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Family Grill Out – Burgers, Dogs, Corn w/ Potato Salad and Baked Beans

Grilled out with the family and neighbors to night. I grilled and I grilled some Burgers, Brats, Hot Dogs and some Ears of Corn. My Mom made the Potato Salad and Baked Beans. No words on dessert yet. Sorry no pictures or great details today running short on time. Enjoy the evening, later!

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