One of America’s Favorites – Bagel and Cream Cheese

February 25, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A bagel with cream cheese

A bagel and cream cheese (also known as bagel with cream cheese) is a common food pairing in American cuisine, the cuisine of New York City, and American Jewish cuisine, consisting in its basic form of an open-faced sandwich made of a bagel spread with cream cheese. The bagel is typically sliced into two pieces, and can be served as-is or toasted. The basic bagel with cream cheese serves as the base for other sandwiches such as the “lox and schmear”, a staple of delicatessens in the New York area, and across the U.S.

A bagel with cream cheese is common in American cuisine and the cuisine of New York City. In the United States, the bagel and cream cheese is often eaten for breakfast, and with smoked salmon is sometimes served for brunch. In New York City circa 1900, a popular combination consisted of a bagel topped with lox, cream cheese, capers, tomato, and red onion.

The combination of a bagel with cream cheese has been promoted to American consumers in the past by American food manufacturers and publishers. In the early 1950s, Kraft Foods launched an “aggressive advertising campaign” that depicted Philadelphia-brand cream cheese with bagels. In 1977, Better Homes and Family Circle magazines published a bagel and cream cheese recipe booklet that was distributed in the magazines and also placed in supermarket dairy cases.

In American Jewish cuisine, a bagel and cream cheese is sometimes called a “whole schmear” or “whole schmeer”, indicating a bagel with cream cheese. A “slab” is a bagel served with a slab of

A “lox and a schmear” refers to a sliced bagel with cream cheese and lox, a part of American Jewish cuisine.

cream cheese atop it. A “lox and a schmear” refers to a bagel with cream cheese and lox or smoked salmon. Tomato, red onion, capers and chopped hard-boiled egg are additional ingredients that are sometimes used on the lox and schmear. All of these terms are used at some delicatessens in New York City, particularly at Jewish delicatessens and older, more traditional delicatessens.

The lox and schmear likely originated in New York City around the time of the turn of the 20th century, when street vendors in the city sold salt-cured belly lox from pushcarts. A high amount of

salt in the fish necessitated the addition of bread and cheese to reduce the lox’s saltiness. It was reported by U.S. newspapers in the early 1940s that bagels and lox were sold by delicatessens in New York City as a “Sunday morning treat”, and in the early 1950s, bagels and cream cheese combination were very popular in the United States, having permeated American culture.

Both bagels and cream cheese are mass-produced foods in the United States. Additionally, in January 2003, Kraft Foods began purveying a mass-produced convenience food product named Philadelphia To Go Bagel & Cream Cheese, which consisted of a combined package of two bagels and cream cheese.

 

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One of America’s Favorites – Cream Cheese

June 11, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Cream Cheese

Cream cheese is a soft, mild-tasting fresh cheese made from milk and cream. Stabilizers such as carob bean gum and carrageenan are typically added in industrial production.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration defines cream cheese as containing at least 33% milk fat with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9. Similarly, under Canadian Food and Drug Regulations cream cheese must contain at least 30% milk fat and a maximum of 55% moisture. In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content.

Cream cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie and Neufchâtel. It is more comparable in taste, texture, and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone.

Recipes for cream cheese can be found in U.S. cookbooks and newspapers beginning in the mid-18th century. By the 1820s the dairy farms in and around Philadelphia and New York City had gained a reputation for producing the best examples of this cheese. Cream cheese was produced on family farms throughout the country, so quantities made and distributed were typically small.

A block of Philadelphia cream cheese

Around 1873 William A. Lawrence, a Chester, New York dairyman, was the first to mass-produce cream cheese. In 1872 he purchased a Neufchâtel factory and shortly thereafter, by adding cream to the process, was able to create a richer cheese that he called “cream cheese”. In 1877 he created the first brand of cream cheese: its logo was a silhouette of a cow followed by the words “Neufchatel & Cream Cheese”. In 1879, to create a larger factory, Lawrence entered into an arrangement with another Chester merchant, Samuel S. Durland. In 1880, Alvah Reynolds, a New York cheese distributor, began to sell the cheese of Lawrence & Durland and called it “Philadelphia Cream Cheese”. By the end of 1880, faced with increasing demand for his Philadelphia-brand cheese, Reynolds turned to Charles Green, a second Chester dairyman, who by 1880 had been manufacturing cream cheese as well. Some of Green’s cheese was now also sold under the Philadelphia label. In 1892 Reynolds bought the Empire Cheese Co. of South Edmeston, New York, to produce cheese under his “Philadelphia” label. When the Empire factory burned down in 1900 he asked the newly formed Phenix Cheese Company to create his cheese, instead. In 1903 Reynolds sold rights to the “Philadelphia” brand name to Phenix Cheese Company under the direction of Jason F. Whitney, Sr. (which merged with Kraft in 1928). By the early 1880s Star cream cheese had emerged as Lawrence & Durland’s brand and Green’s made World and Globe brands of the cheese. At the turn of the 20th century, New York dairymen were producing cream cheese under a number of other brands, as well: Triple Cream (C. Percival), Eagle (F.X. Baumert), Empire (Phenix Cheese Co.), Mohican (International Cheese Co.), Monroe Cheese Co. (Gross & Hoffman), and Nabob (F.H. Legget).

Popular in the Jewish cuisine of New York City, where it is commonly known as a “schmear”, it forms the basis of the bagel and cream cheese, a common open-faced sandwich which also often includes lox, capers, and other ingredients. The basic bagel and cream cheese has become a ubiquitous breakfast and brunch food throughout the U.S.

Cream cheese is easy to make at home, and many methods and recipes are used. Consistent, reliable, commercial manufacture is more difficult. Normally, protein molecules in milk have a negative surface charge, which keeps milk in a liquid state; the molecules act as surfactants, forming micelles around the particles of fat and keeping them in emulsion. Lactic acid bacteria are added to pasteurized and homogenized milk. During the fermentation around 22 °C (72 °F), the pH of the milk decreases (it becomes more acidic). Amino acids at the surface of the proteins begin losing charge and become neutral, turning the fat micelles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic state and causing the liquid to coagulate. If the bacteria are left in the milk too long, the pH lowers further, the micelles attain a positive charge, and the mixture returns to liquid form. The key, then, is to kill the bacteria by heating the mixture to 52–63 °C (126–145 °F) at the moment the cheese is at the isoelectric point, meaning the state at which half the ionizable surface amino acids of the proteins are positively charged and half are negative.

Inaccurate timing of the heating can produce inferior or unsalable cheese due to variations in flavor and texture. Cream cheese has a higher fat content than other cheeses, and fat repels water, which tends to separate from the cheese; this can be avoided in commercial production by adding stabilizers such as guar or carob gums to prolong its shelf life.

In Canada, the regulations for cream cheese stipulate that it is made by coagulating cream with the help of bacteria, forming a curd which is then formed into a mass after removing the whey. Some of its ingredients include cream (to adjust milk fat content), salt, nitrogen (to improve spreadability) and several gelling, thickening, stabilizing and emulsifying ingredients such as xanthan gum or gelatin, to a maximum of 0.5 percent. Regulations on preservatives used are that either sorbic acid, or propionic acid may be used independently or combined, but only to a maximum of 3,000 parts per million when used together. The only acceptable enzymes that can be used in manufacturing of cream cheese to be sold in Canada are chymosin A and B, pepsin and rennet.

In Spain and Mexico, cream cheese is sometimes called by the generic name queso filadelfia, following the marketing of Philadelphia branded cream cheese by Kraft Foods.

Cream cheese is often spread on bread, bagels, crackers, etc., and used as a dip for potato chips and similar snack items, and in salads. It can be mixed with other ingredients, such as yogurt or pepper jelly, to make spreads.

Cream cheese on a bagel

Cream cheese can be used for many purposes in sweet and savoury cookery, and is in the same family of ingredients as other milk products, such as cream, milk, butter, and yogurt. It can be used in cooking to make cheesecake and to thicken sauces and make them creamy. Cream cheese is sometimes used in place of or with butter (typically two parts cream cheese to one part butter) when making cakes or cookies, and cream cheese frosting. It is the main ingredient in the filling of crab rangoon, an appetizer commonly served at U.S. Chinese restaurants. It can also be used instead of or with butter or olive oil in mashed potatoes, and in some westernized sushi rolls. It can also be used for ants on a log.

American cream cheese tends to have lower fat content than elsewhere, but “Philadelphia” branded cheese is sometimes suggested as a substitute for petit suisse.

 

Breakfast Sandwich Recipes

May 8, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Breakfast Sandwich Recipes. Always one of my favorite ways to start the day, a Breakfast Sandwich! Delicious and Healthy Breakfast Sandwich Recipes like; Green Eggs and Ham Bagel Breakfast Sandwich, Spinach and Egg Sweet Potato Toast, and Strawberry-Ricotta Waffle Sandwich. Find these and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 23018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Breakfast Sandwich Recipes
Find healthy, delicious breakfast sandwich recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Green Eggs and Ham Bagel Breakfast Sandwich
This healthy bagel breakfast-sandwich recipe, with layers of ham, Swiss cheese, egg and spinach, is ready in just 5 minutes and can be wrapped up to eat on the go…….

Spinach and Egg Sweet Potato Toast
Skip the gluten and get some vitamin C with this healthy sweet potato toast recipe. Topped with spinach, egg and a dash of hot sauce, it’s a delicious alternative to eggs Benedict…..

Strawberry-Ricotta Waffle Sandwich
Here’s a sweet spin on a healthy breakfast-sandwich recipe. Other seasonal fruit, such as blueberries or sliced peaches, would be tasty toppers too………

* Click the link below to get all the Breakfast Sandwich Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/search/results/?wt=Breakfast%20Sandwich%20Recipes&sort=re

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 7, 2017 at 5:49 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Make your own Bread Crumb toppings……

 

Save all kinds of leftover bagels, bread loaves, rolls, crackers, biscuits, and make them into bread crumbs in a food processor. Then you can freeze them in self-sealing plastic bags or containers and use for stuffings and toppings later.

The Sunday Pizza – Beef Pizza Bagels

December 27, 2015 at 5:56 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday Pizza | 3 Comments
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From the CooksRecipes website it’s this week’s The Sunday Pizza – Beef Pizza Bagels. Easy to prepare with just 5 ingredients; 4 plain bagels (halved), 1/2 pound cooked lean ground beef, 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese, and 1/2 cup pizza or spaghetti sauce. You can find this recipe along with all their other great recipe selection on the CooksRecipes website! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

 

Beef Pizza Bagels

Kids will love these ground beef and cheese pizza bagels.Cooksrecipes 2

Recipe Ingredients:

4 plain bagels, halved
1/2 pound cooked, lean ground beef
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese
1/2 cup pizza or spaghetti sauce
Cooking Directions:

1 – Spread top of each bagel half with 1 tablespoon sauce. Top with approximately 3 tablespoons cooked ground beef. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon cheese.
2 – Place bagels on cookie sheet sprayed with non-stick cooking spray.
3 – Bake in a preheated oven at 350°F (175°C) for 10 minutes or until cheese is melted and bagel is golden brown. (Or, place bagel in 400°F (205°C) toaster oven for 10 minutes.)
Makes 4 servings.

Tip: Especially for the kids – Ask mom or dad to cook an extra pound of lean ground beef ahead of time. After drippings are poured off, separate the ground beef into four plastic baggies and keep in the freezer. These can be taken out of the freezer, reheated in the microwave, and used in this recipe for a short cut.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/appetizer/beef_pizza_bagels_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Cream Cheese

July 7, 2014 at 5:43 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Cream Cheese

Cream Cheese

Cream cheese is a soft, mild-tasting cheese with a high fat content. Stabilizers such as carob bean gum and carrageenan are added.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines the dairy product as containing at least 33% milk fat (as marketed) with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9. In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content.

Cream cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, and so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie and Neufchâtel. It is more comparable in taste, texture and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone.

 

 

 
Early prototypes of cream cheese were referenced in England as early as 1583 and in France as early as 1651. Recipes are recorded soon after 1754, particularly from Lincolnshire and the southwest of England.

 

 

 
In the United States – Recipes for the making of cream cheese can be found in US cookbooks and newspapers beginning in the mid-eighteenth century. By the second decade of the 19th century, Philadelphia and its environs had gained a reputation for this cheese. The cheese, however, was produced on family farms and so quantities for distribution were small. Around 1873, William A. Lawrence, a Chester, NY, dairyman, was the first to mass-produce cream cheese. In 1873 he purchased a Neufchatel factory and shortly thereafter, by adding cream to the process, was able to create a richer cheese, that he called “cream cheese”. In 1877 he created the first brand for cream cheese: the silhouette of a cow followed by the words: Neufchatel & Cream Cheese. In 1879, in order to create a larger factory, Lawrence partnered with a Chester merchant, Samuel S Durland. In 1880, Alvah L Reynolds, a New York cheese distributor, began to sell the cheese of Lawrence & Durland and created a brand name for it: Philadelphia Cream Cheese. Reynolds chose the name based on the reputation Philadelphia had for such cheese. By the end of 1880, faced with increasing demand for his Philadelphia brand, Reynolds turned to Charles Green, a second Chester dairyman, who, by 1880, had been manufacturing cream cheese. Some of Green’s cheese was, now, also sold under the Philadelphia label. In 1892, Reynolds bought the Empire Cheese Co. of South Edmeston, NY to produce cheese under his Philadelphia label.

 

When that burned down in 1900, he turned, the following year, to the newly formed Phenix Cheese Co. to produce his cheese. In 1903, Reynolds sold the rights to his Philadelphia brand to Phenix (which merged with Kraft in 1928). By the early 1880s, in addition to Philadelphia brand, was Star, a second cream cheese brand of Lawrence & Durland, and Green’s World and Globe brands. At the turn of the 19th century, New York dairymen were producing cream cheese for a number of other brands: Double Cream (C. Percival); Eagle (F.X. Baumert); Empire (Phenix Cheese Co.); Mohican (International Cheese Co.); Monroe Cheese Co. (Gross & Hoffman); and Nabob (F.H. Legget).

 

 

 

Cream cheese on a bagel

Cream cheese on a bagel

Cream cheese is often spread on bread, bagels, crackers, etc., and used as a dip for potato chips and similar snack items, and in salads. It can be mixed with other ingredients to make spreads, such as yogurt-cream spread (1.25 parts cream cheese, 1 part yogurt, whipped).

Cream cheese can be used for many purposes in sweet and savoury cookery, and is in the same family of ingredients as other milk products, such as cream, milk, butter, and yogurt. It can be used in cooking to make cheesecake and to thicken sauces and make them creamy. Cream cheese is sometimes used in place of or with butter (typically two parts cream cheese to one part butter) when making cakes or cookies, and cream cheese frosting. It is the main ingredient in crab rangoon, an appetizer commonly served at US Chinese restaurants. It can also be used instead of butter or olive oil in mashed potatoes. It is also commonly used in some western-style sushi rolls.

American cream cheese tends to have lower fat content than elsewhere, but “Philadelphia” branded cheese is sometimes suggested as a substitute for petit suisse.

 

 

 
Cream cheese is easy to make at home, and many methods and recipes are used. Consistent, reliable, commercial manufacture is more difficult. Normally, protein molecules in milk have a negative surface charge, which keeps milk in a liquid state; the molecules act as surfactants, forming micelles around the particles of fat and keeping them in emulsion. Lactic acid bacteria are added to pasteurized and homogenized milk. During the fermentation at around 22 °C (72 °F),[citation needed] the pH of the milk decreases (it becomes more acidic). Amino acids at the surface of the proteins begin losing charge and become neutral, turning the fat micelles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic state and causing the liquid to coagulate. If the bacteria are left in the milk too long, the pH lowers further, the micelles attain a positive charge and the mixture returns to liquid form. The key, then, is to kill the bacteria by heating the mixture to 52–63 °C (126–145 °F)[citation needed] at the moment the cheese is at the isoelectric point, meaning the state at which half the ionizable surface amino acids of the proteins are positively charged and half are negative.

Inaccurate timing of the heating can produce inferior or unsalable cheese due to variations in flavor and texture. Cream cheese has a higher fat content than other cheeses, and fat repels water, which tends to separate from the cheese; this can be avoided in commercial production by adding stabilizers such as guar or carob gums to prolong its shelf life.

In Spain and Mexico, cream cheese is sometimes called by the generic name queso filadelfia, following the marketing of Philadelphia branded cream cheese by Kraft Foods.

 

Seafood of the Week – Lox

May 6, 2014 at 5:29 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | 1 Comment
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Lox on bagel

Lox on bagel

 

Lox is a fillet of brined salmon. Traditionally, lox is served on a bagel with cream cheese, and is usually garnished with tomato, sliced red onion, and sometimes capers, which diners may or may not opt to add to the bagel. Some American preparations of scrambled eggs or frittata include a mince of lox and onion.

 

 

 

Lox and cream cheese sandwich

Lox and cream cheese sandwich

* Nova or Nova Scotia salmon, sometimes called Nova lox, is cured with a milder brine and then cold-smoked. The name dates from a time when much of the salmon in New York City came from Nova Scotia. Today, however, the name refers to the milder brining, as compared to regular lox (or belly lox), and the fish may come from other waters or even be raised on farms.
* Scotch or Scottish-style salmon. A mixture of salt and sometimes sugars, spices, and other flavorings is applied directly to the meat of the fish; this is called “dry-brining” or “Scottish-style.” The brine mixture is then rinsed off, and the fish is cold-smoked.
* Nordic-style smoked salmon. The fish is salt-cured and cold-smoked.
* Gravad lax or gravlax. This is a traditional Nordic means of preparing salmon. The salmon is coated with a spice mixture, which often includes dill, sugars, salt, and spices like juniper berry. It is often served with a sweet mustard-dill sauce.
Other similar brined and smoked fish products are also popular in delis and fish stores, particularly in Chicago & the New York City boroughs, such as chubs, Sable (smoked cod), smoked sturgeon, smoked whitefish, and kippered herring.

 

 

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