One of America’s Favorites – Italian Beef Sandwich

December 7, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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An Italian beef is a sandwich, originating in Chicago, composed of thin slices of seasoned roast beef, simmered and served au jus (known by locals as ‘gravy’) on a long Italian-style roll. The sandwich’s history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is, at the diner’s preference, often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically

An Italian beef sandwich

topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera (called “hot”) or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers (called “sweet”).

Italian beef sandwiches are commonly found at many area hot dog stands, pizzerias and Italian-American restaurants in northeastern Illinois, southeast Wisconsin (notably Kenosha), Northwest Indiana, Fort Wayne, and Indianapolis. In recent years, Chicago expatriates have opened restaurants across the country serving Italian beef.

 

Italian beef is made using cuts of beef from the sirloin rear or the top/bottom round wet-roasted in broth with garlic, oregano and spices until cooked throughout. The meat is roasted at ≤ 350 °F (177 °C); this results in up to a 45% reduction in weight, but also yields the sandwich’s famous ‘jus’ or gravy. The beef is then cooled, sliced thin using a deli slicer, and then reintroduced to its reheated beef broth. The beef then sits in the broth, typically for hours. The inefficiency of this process, however, has started to concern many larger Italian beef producers and retailers. In response, some attempt to achieve higher yields by lowering the cooking temperature and placing the beef into food-grade polyester and nylon cook bags, which changes the outer appearance of the beef. Though this reduced time is sufficient for cooking the beef all the way through, it does not allow the jus to be harvested fully. Because traditional Italian beefs are dipped in the jus from their own roast, when this more efficient method is used, the sandwich’s potency is affected. Some companies add MSG, phosphates and other additives in attempts to reach for higher yields.

 

The exact origin is unknown, but many believe it was created by Italian immigrants who worked for Chicago’s old Union Stock Yards in the early 1900s. They often would bring home some of the tougher, less desirable cuts of beef sold by the company. To make the meat more palatable, it was slow-roasted to make it more tender, then slow-simmered in a spicy broth for flavor. Both the roasting and the broth used Italian-style spices and herbs. The meat was then thinly sliced across the grain and stuffed into fresh Italian bread.

According to Scala’s Original Beef and Sausage Company (formed in 1925), this meal was originally introduced at weddings and banquets where the meat was sliced thinly so there would be enough to feed all the guests. It rapidly grew in popularity and eventually became one of Chicago’s most famous ethnic foods: the original Italian beef sandwich.

The recipe was popularized by Pasquale Scala, and a group of his associates who started small beef stands in Chicago and used similar recipes, perfecting Chicago’s original Italian beef sandwich. Al Ferreri and his sister and brother-in-law, Frances and Chris (Baba) Pacelli, founded Al’s Beef in 1938, and Mr. Beef on Orleans co-founders Carl Buonavolanto Jr. and his Tony (“Uncle Junior” to the Buonavolantos) Ozzauto each set up shop.

Other Italian beef purveyors likewise set up shop in the 40s, many obtaining their beef from Scala Packing Company of Chicago. Chris Pacelli (Baba) (founder of Al’s Beef in 1938), Carl Bonavolanto Jr. and Tony Ozzauto (co-founders, Mr. Beef on Orleans in 1961), were among the group.

By 1954, a local restaurant Al’s Beef was advertising its “Pizza, Spaghetti, Ravioli, and Italian Beef Sandwiches” in the Chicago Tribune.

Mr. Beef’s founder helped his brother, Joe Buonavolanto, open one of the first Italian beef stands outside of the city limits.

 

There are varying degrees of juiciness, depending on taste. Nomenclature varies from stand to stand, but wet or dipped means the bread is quickly dunked in the juice; juicy even wetter; and soaked is dripping wet.

Most Chicago beef restaurants also offer a “combo,” adding a grilled Italian sausage to the sandwich. Different eateries offer hot or mild sausage, or both.

Typical beef orders are:

* Hot dipped: Italian beef on gravy-wetted bread and giardiniera.
* Hot dipped combo: Italian beef and sausage on gravy-wetted bread with giardiniera.
* Sweet dry: Italian beef placed on dry bread, topped with sweet peppers.
* Gravy bread: meatless Italian bread soaked in the juice of Italian beef, often served with peppers or giardiniera. Also known in some places as “Soakers” or “Juice-ons”.
* Cheesy beef or cheef: Italian beef with cheese (Provolone, Mozzarella or, rarely, Cheddar); not all stands offer this.
* Cheesy beef on garlic: Italian beef with cheese (Provolone, Mozzarella or, rarely, Cheddar) and the bread being pre-cooked and seasoned like traditional garlic bread; not all stands offer this.
Some order the “triple double,” which consists of double cheese, double sausage and double beef. Other even less common variations include substituting Italian bread with a large croissant or topping with marinara sauce.

 

One of America’s Favorites – French Dip

April 6, 2015 at 5:36 AM | Posted in BEEF | 1 Comment
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A French dip

A French dip

An American cuisine, the French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Beef broth or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. Despite the name, this American specialty is almost completely unknown in France, the name seeming to refer to the style of bread rather than an alleged French origin.

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet and Philippe The Original. Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home Of The Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At both of these restaurants, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped” at either establishment. Philippe’s own brand of spicy mustard is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.

His controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908.

Roast Beef Dip au jus, with french fries

Roast Beef Dip au jus, with french fries

However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918.

The story of the sandwich’s invention by Philippe’s has several variants: some sources say that the sandwich was first created by a cook or a server who, while preparing a sandwich for a police officer or fireman, accidentally dropped it into a pan of meat drippings. The patron liked it, and the dish surged in popularity shortly after its invention. Other accounts say that a customer who didn’t want some meat drippings to go to waste requested his sandwich be dipped in them. Still others say that a chef dipped a sandwich into a pan of meat drippings after a customer complained that the bread was stale. Cole’s account states that the sandwich was invented by a sympathetic chef, Jack Garlinghouse, for a customer who was complaining of sore gums. Some accounts tell Philippe’s version of events, but assign the location to Cole’s. The mystery of the sandwich’s invention might not be solved due to a lack of information and observable evidence.

The French dip is now served at a number of restaurant chains including fast food, diners, and standard restaurants.

 

 

 

Easy French Dip Sandwiches
From the http://allrecipes.com/ website, Easy French Dip Sandwiches.

“This sandwich made with sliced roast beef and provolone cheese is a crowd pleaser. The flavor is so rich, no one will know it only took 15 minutes to put together.”
INGREDIENTS:
1 (10.5 ounce) can beef consommeAll Recipes
1 cup water
1 pound thinly sliced deli roast beef
8 slices provolone cheese
4 hoagie rolls, split lengthwise

 
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Open the hoagie rolls and lay out on a baking sheet.
2. Heat beef consomme and water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat to make a rich beef broth. Place the roast beef in the broth and warm for 3 minutes. Arrange the meat on the hoagie rolls and top each roll with 2 slices of provolone.
3. Bake the sandwiches in the preheated oven for 5 minutes, or until the cheese just begins to melt. Serve the sandwiches with small bowls of the warm broth for dipping.

 
Nutrition Information
Servings Per Recipe: 4
Calories: 548
Amount Per Serving
Total Fat: 22.6g
Cholesterol: 94mg
Sodium: 2310mg
Amount Per Serving
Total Carbs: 40.5g
Dietary Fiber: 2g
Protein: 44.6g

 
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/easy-french-dip-sandwiches/

One of America’s Favorites – Beef on Weck

February 2, 2015 at 6:29 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A traditional beef on weck

A traditional beef on weck

A beef on weck is a sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and french fries.

 

 

The kummelweck roll gives the sandwich its name and a distinctive taste. A kummelweck (sometimes pronounced “kimmelweck” or “kümmelweck”) is topped with kosher salt and caraway seeds. Kümmel is the German word for caraway, and weck means “roll” in the south-western German dialects of the Baden and Swabia areas (northern Germans generally say Brötchen), although the kind of weck used for this sandwich in America tends to be much softer and fluffier than a standard German Kümmelbrötchen or Kümmelweck. The sandwich has been introduced to new areas of the United States with population movement. In Austria, a similar type of small white-bread is known as Kümmelweckerl (diminutive from Wecken, which refers to a whole big bread, i.e. Brotwecken)

 
The origin and history of the beef on weck sandwich is not well established. It is believed that a German baker named William Wahr, who is thought to have emigrated from the Black Forest region of Germany, created the kummelweck roll while living in Buffalo, New York. A local pub owner is said to have used the roll to create the beef on weck, with the thought that the salty top of the roll would make his patrons purchase more drinks.
A typical beef on weck is made from slow-roasted rare roast beef that is hand carved in thin slices to provide about 1⁄2 inch (13 mm) of meat on the bottom half of the roll. The cut face of the top half of the roll may be dipped in the jus from the roast. Prepared horseradish is usually provided for the diner to spread on the top half of the roll to taste. The traditional side dishes for a beef on weck are french fries and a kosher dill pickle spear.

 
The beef on weck has long been popular regionally, and has gained a following in other areas of the United States where it has been introduced. Expatriates from Western New York have taken the dish and brought it to other areas after relocating. It has also been featured by chefs on cooking shows including the PBS special Sandwiches That You Will Like. Bobby Flay, Anthony Bourdain and other chefs have featured the beef on weck, or a variant, on their television programs.

The American restaurant chain Buffalo Wild Wings was started by former residents of the Western New York area and the original name of the restaurant was “Buffalo Wild Wings and Weck” or as “BW3”, the third W referring to weck. The chain no longer serves weck outside of the Western New York area and no longer uses the original name, but some still refer to the company with the extra “W” in its abbreviation.

 

 

Beef on Weck Sandwich – Beef on Weck Sandwich Recipe:

I came across this recipe for Beef on Weck off one of my favorite sites What’s Cooking America. http://whatscookingamerica.net/

Whats Cooking America

 

Some people consider Beef on Weck (thinly sliced slow-roasted rare roast beef piled as high as 6 inches) on a freshly baked kummelweck roll, the Best Roast Beef Sandwich in America. Also called Beef on Wick, an alternative spelling usually used by older people from Buffalo and eastern suburbanites.

This sandwich is a tradition and a staple of Buffalo, New York, as it is Buffalo’s signature sandwich. The key to a good Beef on Weck is freshness and freshly-carved beef! In Buffalo, the beef must be on the rare side, preferably carved right off the bone and served on a salty kimmelweck roll. In fact, it is this roll that makes the sandwich unique. Few, if any, restaurants outside the Buffalo area serve this sandwich or even know what it is.
Beef on Weck Sandwich – Beef on Weck Sandwich Recipe:

Yields: 8 sandwiches
Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 50 minutes
Ingredients:

1 (3- to 4-pounds) beef roast (tenderloin, Prime Rib, or eye of round)
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper
Cornstarch Glaze (see recipe below)
8 Kimmelweck or Kaiser rolls*
2 tablespoons caraway seeds
2 tablespoons coarse salt**
Prepared horseradish

* Kimmelweck roll is a salty roll that is similar to a Kaiser roll.

** Rock salt (like the kind used for pretzels) is the preferred salt used in Buffalo. If you can’t get this, any salt with granules larger than table salt will do. I used coarse salt.
Preparation:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Rub roast with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place roast on rack in a shallow baking pan, tucking the thin end under to make it as thick as the rest of the roast. Bake, uncovered, 40 to 45 minutes or until thermometer registers 130 to 135 degrees F. Remove from oven and transfer to a cutting board; let stand 15 minutes before carving. Reserve meat juice, and carve meat into very thin slices (as thin as you can slice).

Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F.

Brush the prepared Cornstarch Glaze on the top of each kimmelweck or Kaiser roll; sprinkle equal amounts of caraway seeds and heat in the oven for 3 minutes or until tops of the rolls get crusty and the caraway seeds and salt begin to stick. Remove from oven and cut each roll in half lengthwise.

To assemble sandwiches, divide sliced beef on the bottom half of each roll, spoon with reserved beef juice, and top with the top half of each roll. Serve with horseradish on the side.

Makes 8 sandwiches.

Cornstarch Glaze:
1/2 cup cold water
1 tablespoon cornstarch

In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stir together water and cornstarch. Heat mixture to a gentle boil. Reduce heat to low, and stir until mixture thickens and is translucent. Remove from heat and let cool.

 
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Sandwich/BeefOnWeck.htm

One of America’s Favorites – French Dip

April 28, 2014 at 7:11 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A French dip

A French dip

 

In American cuisine a French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Beef broth or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. Despite the name, this American specialty is almost completely unknown in France, the name seeming to refer to the style of bread rather than an alleged French origin.

 

 

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

 

 

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet and Philippe The Original. Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home Of The Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At both of these restaurants, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped” at either establishment. Philippe’s own brand of spicy mustard is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.

 

 

This controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908. However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918. Cole’s was the oldest restaurant or bar in Los Angeles to operate continuously since its opening at the same location. Its streak ended when it closed for remodeling on March 15, 2007. It reopened on December 4, 2008.

 

French dip, with bowl of jus for dipping

French dip, with bowl of jus for dipping

The story of the sandwich’s invention by Philippe’s has several variants: some sources say that the sandwich was first created by a cook or a server who, while preparing a sandwich for a police officer or fireman, accidentally dropped it into a pan of meat drippings. The patron liked it, and the dish surged in popularity shortly after its invention. Other accounts say that a customer who didn’t want some meat drippings to go to waste requested his sandwich be dipped in them. Still others say that a chef dipped a sandwich into a pan of meat drippings after a customer complained that the bread was stale. Cole’s account states that the sandwich was invented by a sympathetic chef, Jack Garlinghouse, for a customer who was complaining of sore gums. Some accounts tell Philippe’s version of events, but assign the location to Cole’s. The mystery of the sandwich’s invention might not be solved due to a lack of information and observable evidence.

 

 

The French dip is now served at a number of restaurant chains including fast food, diners and standard restaurants.

 

 

 

French Dip Sandwich Recipe
Ingredients:

1 (4-pound) beef rib eye, sirloin, or tenderloin roast
1/2 cup coarsely-ground black pepper
Dipping Sauce (recipe follows)
8 French rolls
Butter

 
Preparation:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Place beef roast onto a rack in a shallow baking pan; firmly press pepper onto roast. Bake, uncovered, 30 to 45 minutes or until thermometer in the thickest part of roast registers 135 degrees F. Remove from oven and transfer onto a cutting board; let stand 15 minute before carving; slice beef thinly.

Reserve juice and pour into a medium saucepan. Prepare Dipping Sauce.

For each sandwich: Cut French rolls in half. Toast and butter each French roll. Layer about 1/2 pound of sliced beef on bottom slice of each roll; place remaining tops of rolls on top of the beef. Slice sandwiches in half and serve on individual plates with a small bowl (1/4 cup) of hot Dipping Sauce.

Makes 8 sandwiches.

 

Dipping Sauce:
Drippings from cooking pan
1 (10.5 ounce) can beef broth
1/2 cup water
Salt and pepper to taste

In a medium saucepan, add beef drippings, beef broth, water, salt and pepper; bring just to a boil. turn off heat, cover, and let site 10 minutes before serving.

 

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/Sandwiches/FrenchDipSandwich.htm

Slow Simmered Au Jus Pork Roast w/ Oven Baked Scalloped Potatoes

July 20, 2013 at 5:10 PM | Posted in Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Pork, potatoes | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Slow Simmered Au Jus Pork Roast w/ Oven Baked Scalloped PotatoesPork Roast Sand Scalloped Potatoes 001

 

 

Not quite as humid or hot today but it could feel a lot better outside! Thank goodness I have a good air conditioner in my car as I went to Dayton, Ohio to pick up a friend at the Dayton Airport. But as luck would have it the flight was about 45 minutes late. By the time we got back into town and I dropped him off it was getting late in the day and i forgot to lay anything out for dinner. Thank goodness for packaged meals! I went with a Hormel Simple Ideas Slow Simmered Au Jus Pork Roast and Bob Evans Oven Baked Scalloped Potatoes.

 

 

I’ve had the Hormel Simple Ideas Slow Simmered Au Jus Pork Roast before but it’s been a while. Very easy and quick to prepare. Just microwave it in its own microwave container for 5 minutes then let it cool for a minute or so and you have yourself a delicious Pork Roast. Plenty of Pork in it and very well seasoned with some tasty juices. Makes a great main dish or use it as sandwiches, which is what I did. I served it on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Bun and topped with some Woeber’s Horseradish Mustard, a perfect Mustard for Pork or Beef.

 

 

Then for a side to go with my Pork Roast another microwave, quick, and easy product, Bob Evans Oven Baked Scalloped Potatoes. This one also comes in a microwave package, just heat for 6 minutes and serve. First time I tried this and it also was delicious! Plenty of Potatoes with an excellent Cheese Sauce and seasoning. I’ll definitely use this again. So to be an all microwave meal it was a very filling and delicious meal. Plus it left me with some killer leftovers and a very easy one to clean up afterwards. For dessert/snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.

 

 

 
Hormel Simple Ideas Slow Simmered Au Jus Pork RoastHormel Pork roast

* Hormel Simple Ideas Slow Simmered Au Jus Pork Roast:
* Slowly simmered in au jus and ready to enjoy with your favorite side dish
* Additional recipes, boil-in tray and conventional oven directions inside sleeve
* Suitable for freezing
* Simple ideas for great meals
* Ready when you are
* Inspected for wholesomeness by U.S. Department of Agriculture
* No preservatives

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 140 G
Servings Per Container 3.5
Amount Per Serving
Calories 170Calories from Fat 60
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7 G 11
Saturated Fat 3 G 15
Cholesterol 75 Mg 25
Sodium 500 Mg 21
Total Carbohydrate 1 G 0
Sugars 1 G
Protein 26 G

 

 

 

BOB EVANS OVEN BAKE™ SCALLOPED POTATOESBob Evans Scalloped Pot
Our Bob Evans Oven Bake™ Scalloped Potatoes look like you made them from scratch in the oven–but you didn’t. Made with real cheddar cheese, they’re microwave ready in just minutes
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size140 g
Servings per Container4
Amount Per Serving
Calories 220.00 Calories from Fat 110.00
% Daily Value*
Total Fat13.00g20%
Saturated Fat8.00g40%
Trans Fat0.00g0%
Cholesterol40.00mg13%
Sodium490.00mg20%
Total Carbohydrate19.00g6%
Dietary Fiber2.00g8%
Sugars2.00g0%
Protein7.00g0%

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Au Jus Roast for Sirloin Tip & Top Round Roast

April 10, 2013 at 9:33 AM | Posted in bison | Leave a comment
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Hot & High, Low & Slow Au Jus Roast for Sirloin Tip & Top Round Roast
By: Jill O’Brien

 
This Hot & High, then Low & Slow method of roasting produces a delicious and amazingly tender medium rare roast. Serve this classic Wild Idea Sirloin Tip Roaststyle roast with au jus and horseradish cream sauce. This is great roast for entertaining a crowd or a make ahead staple for shaved roast buffalo sandwiches.

 

 

INGREDIENTS:
Sirloin Tip or Top Round Roast

3 T Olive Oil
Salt & Pepper to Taste
1 T butter
1 cup wine, stock or water
PREPARATION:

1 – Rinse roast and pat dry.
2 – Rub roast with olive oil & season as desired. Let roast rest at room temperature for 2 hours before roasting.
3 – Pre-heat oven to 500°
4 – Place prepared roast in heavy roasting pan, and place in 500° oven. Close door quickly.
5 – Reduce oven temperature to 475° and roast uncovered for 13 minutes.­
6 – Turn oven off. Leave roast in oven for 2 ½ hours. DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ANYTIME DURING ROASTING PROCESS. (And yes, that is important enough for all caps!)
7 – Remove roast from oven and place on cutting board. Slice roast, keeping slices close together.
8 – Place roasting pan on stove top, over medium high heat.
9 – Add 1 tablespoon butter and scrape brown bits from the bottom of the pan.
10 – Deglaze with 1 cup wine, stock or water and bring to a simmer, for au jus.
11 – Preheat oven to 500° and place sliced roast in oven for 5 minutes to warm. Pass roast with au jus and horseradish sauce.
Temperature Guide–Internal Temperatures of Meat:

Rare – 130 degrees. Medium-rare – 140 degrees. Medium – 155 degrees.
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/hot-high-low-slow-au-jus-roast-for-sirloin-tip-top-round-roast/

Hot & High, Low & Slow Au Jus Roast for Sirloin Tip & Top Round Roast

April 3, 2013 at 9:58 AM | Posted in bison | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Here’s the Buffalo Recipe of the week from Wild Idea Buffalo. The Buffalo used for this recipe can be purchased from http://wildideabuffalo.com/. When you get time check out the site for all cuts of Buffalo and some great recipes and tips.

 
Hot & High, Low & Slow Au Jus Roast for Sirloin Tip & Top Round Roast

Sirloin Tip Roast

Sirloin Tip Roast

By: Jill O’Brien

This Hot & High, then Low & Slow method of roasting produces a delicious and amazingly tender medium rare roast. Serve this classic style roast with au jus and horseradish cream sauce. This is great roast for entertaining a crowd or a make ahead staple for shaved roast buffalo sandwiches.

 
INGREDIENTS:
Sirloin Tip or Top Round Roast, 3lbs.

3 T Olive Oil
Salt & Pepper to Taste
1 T butter
1 cup wine, stock or water

 

PREPARATION:

Rinse roast and pat dry.
Rub roast with olive oil & season as desired. Let roast rest at room temperature for 2 hours before roasting.
Pre-heat oven to 500°
Place prepared roast in heavy roasting pan, and place in 500° oven. Close door quickly.
Reduce oven temperature to 475° and roast uncovered for 13 minutes.­
Turn oven off. Leave roast in oven for 2 ½ hours. DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ANYTIME DURING ROASTING PROCESS. (And yes, that is important enough for all caps!)
Remove roast from oven and place on cutting board. Slice roast, keeping slices close together.
Place roasting pan on stove top, over medium high heat.
Add 1 tablespoon butter and scrape brown bits from the bottom of the pan.
Deglaze with 1 cup wine, stock or water and bring to a simmer, for au jus.
Preheat oven to 500° and place sliced roast in oven for 5 minutes to warm. Pass roast with au jus and horseradish sauce.
Temperature Guide–Internal Temperatures of Meat:

Rare – 130 degrees. Medium-rare – 140 degrees. Medium – 155 degrees.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/hot-high-low-slow-au-jus-roast-for-sirloin-tip-top-round-roast/

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