It’s a Wrap!

July 27, 2013 at 11:14 AM | Posted in cooking, Joseph's Pita Bread | Leave a comment
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As I had said in an earlier post I’ve been using Joseph’s Flax, Oat Bran, and Whole Wheat Pita Bread ever since I came across it in the Wraps 002Walmart Bakery. At only 50 Calories and 4 Net Carbs you can’t beat it.

 
For breakfast a Scrambled Egg and Cheese Wrap. Scrambled 1 Egg, seasoned with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, a few shakes of Frank’s Red Hot Sauce, and a sprinkle of Sargento Reduced Fat Shredded Cheddar Cheese. Just put the Scrambled Egg in the Pita Bread and top with a light sprinkle of the Sargento Shredded Cheddar, one quick, easy and healthy way to start the morning.

 
Then for a lunch option, once again using the Pita Bread I just added some thin slices of Kroger Brand Private Selection Oven Roasted Rosemary Ham. This has become my favorite packaged Ham incredible taste and it’s 70 calories and 1 carb per serving. You can add a slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese, only 40 calories per slice, or season it up a little with French’s Mustard or Kraft Light Mayo. No matter the topping it makes one good Ham Wrap! I’m beginning too think everything’s better in a Wrap! Did you notice the orange Taco Holders? A very useful and inexpensive kitchen item to have, especially if you eat a lot of Tacos or Wraps

 

Wraps 005

 

 
Joseph’s Flax, Oat Bran, and Whole Wheat Pita Bread

Flax Variety Pack Now enjoy some of Joseph’s most popular products together in one package! The Flax Variety Pack allows you to enjoy three packages of our Flax Pita Bread, Mini Flax Pita Bread, and Flax Lavash.

 

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 pita (28.3g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 10 Calories 50

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 1g 2%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 25mg 1%
Total Carbohydrate 7g 2%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 0g
Protein 5g

 

 

http://www.josephsbakery.com/p-10289-Flax-Variety-Pack-Flax-Pita-Bread-Mini-Flax-Pita-Bread-Flax-Lavash

Eating with Diabetes: Counting ”Net” Carbs

July 23, 2013 at 9:07 AM | Posted in diabetes | 3 Comments
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I count carbs and recently a friend told me to start counting “net carbs”. So I did a little research on Carbs vs Net Carbs and there seems to be some controversy. Here’s what I found from a couple of sites.

 

 
Eating with Diabetes: Counting ”Net” Carbs
What Are Net Carbs? How Do They Affect Blood Sugar?
— By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator

 

Since low carbohydrate diets became popular, the phrase “net carbs” has become a fairly regular fixture on the labels of food products. But, if you are not familiar with the term you may be wondering what in the world it means!

There are three types of carbohydrates: starches, sugars and fiber. All three types of carbs are added up and listed as Total Carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts Label of a food product.

The concept of net carbs is based on the fact that, although it is considered a carbohydrate, dietary fiber is not digested the same way the other two types of carbohydrates (starches and sugars) are. While starches and sugars are broken down into glucose (blood sugar), fiber isn’t treated the same way. The fiber you eat passes through the body undigested and helps add bulk to your stool (among other benefits). The indigestibility of fiber is where the idea of “net carbs” comes in. In fact, sometimes, net carbs are sometimes referred to as “digestible carbs.”

In recent years, food manufacturers have started including net carbs in addition to total carbs when labeling products. Many foods proudly display net carbs on their labels to entice both low-carb diet fans and people with diabetes.

While the concept of net carbs can be utilized in diabetes meal planning, read labels with a discerning eye. At present there are no mandated rules for calculating or labeling net carbs on food packages. The FDA does not regulate or oversee the use of these terms, and exactly what is listed as “net carbs” can vary dramatically from product to product. Some products calculate net carbs as total carbohydrates minus dietary fiber, other labels reflect net carbs as total carbohydrates minus dietary fiber minus sugar alcohols, and still others calculate net carbs as total carbohydrates, minus dietary fiber minus sugar alcohols minus grams of protein.

Many packaged foods that are marketed as high in fiber low in carbs actually add extra fiber, such as inulin, polydextrose and maltodextrin, to food products to lower the net carb serving. Most nutrition experts agree that these “stealth fibers ” do not have the same health benefits and may not have the same benign affect on blood sugar levels as foods that contain naturally occurring fiber. As you can see, the whole issue of “net carbs” can get tricky very fast. And for people with diabetes, for whom carbohydrate counting and blood glucose control is a serious issue, referring to net carbs on a food label can have serious consequences.

However, counting net carbs can work for people with diabetes who use a meal-planning technique known as carbohydrate counting to help balance their blood sugar levels—when done correctly.

Here’s how a person with diabetes can count net carbs safely and effectively:
The food in question must contain at least 5 grams of dietary fiber in the serving size you are planning to eat.
Read the Nutrition Facts label or look up the nutrition facts of the food to find both the total carbohydrates and total fiber for the serving size you plan to eat.
Subtract HALF the total grams of fiber from the total grams of carbohydrates to calculate the net carbs in your food serving.
Always perform this calculation yourself and do not rely on “net carb” totals listed on any food label.

The whole point of counting net carbs versus total carbs is to allow someone to eat more of a carbohydrate-containing food without adversely affecting their blood sugar levels. If you find the issue of net carbs confusing, don’t worry about it. There is no reason to use this technique if counting total carbohydrates works well for you. Both options can work as long as you are doing them correctly and reading “net carb” labels with a discerning eye.

For more specific information or help, talk to your health care provider. The American Diabetes Association‘s National Call Center also offers live advice from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST, Monday through Friday at 1-800-DIABETES or 1-800-342-2383.

 

 

http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/health_articles.asp?id=1652

 

 

 

 

In an effort to cash in on the low-carb craze, food manufacturers have invented a new category of carbohydrates known as “net carbs,” which promises to let dieters eat the sweet and creamy foods they crave without suffering the carb consequences.

 

But the problem is that there is no legal definition of the “net,” “active,” or “impact” carbs popping up on food labels and advertisements. The only carbohydrate information regulated by the FDA is provided in the Nutrition Facts label, which lists total carbohydrates and breaks them down into dietary fiber and sugars.

 

Any information or claims about carbohydrate content that appear outside that box have not been evaluated by the FDA.

 
http://women.webmd.com/features/net-carb-debate

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