Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 15, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Apple Pie baking………

A tablespoon of minute tapioca sprinkled in apple pie will absorb excess juice while baking.

Thank you to Jean for passing this along.

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Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 22, 2016 at 6:09 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Apple Pie Lovers (We’ll be trying this one soon)…

 
A tablespoon of minute tapioca sprinkled in apple pie will absorb excess juice while baking.

Healthy Apple Desserts

June 25, 2016 at 5:31 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website its Healthy Apple Desserts. Delicious and healthy Apple Desserts that include recipes like; Old-Fashioned Apple-Nut Crisp, Apple-Cinnamon Fruit Bars, and Deep-Dish Apple Pie. Find all these delicious Apple Recipes at the EatingWell website, and while there check out all their healthy and delicious recipes. http://www.eatingwell.com/

 
Healthy Apple DessertsEatingWell2

Delicious dessert recipes made with heart-healthy apples.
Our healthy apple desserts are the perfect ending to your fall meal. Apples are high in soluble fiber, potassium, vitamin C and folate, so you’ll feel good about indulging in these delicious desserts. Whether you’re baking apple pie or apple crisp for Thanksgiving or are looking for an easy apple snack, such as our Apple-Cinnamon Fruit Bars, these apple dessert recipes highlight sweet-tart, crunchy apples.

 

 

Old-Fashioned Apple-Nut Crisp
Apples and nuts are a classic—and healthful—combination, especially when you cut back on the saturated fat that typically tops this sweet treat. Our version is just as delicious, and allows the flavor of the hazelnuts to shine through. A dollop of Vanilla Cream or scoop of vanilla frozen yogurt finishes this homey dessert beautifully…….

 
Apple-Cinnamon Fruit Bars
These easy apple-cinnamon fruit bars make a big batch—perfect for fall potlucks and parties…..

 
Deep-Dish Apple Pie
With all that delicious fruit an apple pie should be healthy, but the truth is a slice can have as much as 750 calories and 30 grams of fat. For the most part, the culprit is the crust. We use whole-wheat pastry flour to add fiber and lower the saturated fat by replacing some of the butter with canola oil. The brown sugar-sweetened filling in this pie is made with two kinds of apples for the perfect balance. A slice has half the calories of a typical version and only 10 grams of fat—sweet!…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Apple Desserts
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_apple_desserts

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 13, 2015 at 5:54 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Dotty for passing this hint along,….

 

A tablespoon of minute tapioca sprinkled in apple pie will absorb excess juice while baking.

Cozy Fall Dessert Recipes

October 24, 2015 at 5:15 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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Warm up the cool Fall Days and Nights with these Cozy Fall Dessert Recipes from the Diabetic Living Online website. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Cozy Fall Dessert RecipesDiabetic living logo
The cozy flavors of fall — pumpkin, apple, peanut butter, and chocolate — make our sweet desserts perfect for the season. These comforting cobblers, cookies, pies, and cakes are even better served warm with love. You’ll find Apple Pie, Cheesecake, Custards, and more! It’s off one of my favorite sites Diabetic Living Online.

 
Triple-A Apple Pie

Apples, Anjou pears, and apricots are the As that make this apple pie a knockout……

 
No-Bake Pumpkin Swirl Cheesecake

You can enjoy this luscious swirled cheesecake without turning on the oven — it’s a mix-and-chill recipe perfect for holiday gatherings…..

 

Peanut Butter Custards

Smooth and creamy, these two-tone desserts are rich in flavor but low in fat because they’re made with reduced-fat peanut butter and fat-free half-and-half……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Cozy Fall Dessert Recipes

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/dessert/cozy-fall-dessert-recipes

Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and Eating

September 10, 2015 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Here’s some great tips, info, and recipes on Fall’s Favorite Harvest the Apple. From the EatingWell website it’s Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and Eating. http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and EatingEatingWell2

Find out which types of apples are best for apple pie and more apple recipes.
All apples are not created equal—at least when it comes to cooking vs. eating them fresh. But regardless of variety, they’re all good for you. A medium apple (3-inch diameter) contains 4 grams of fiber; a large apple (3 1/4-inch diameter) has 5 grams of fiber. Apples also offer a bit of vitamin C and potassium.

 

 

So what apples are best for your lunchbox and what apples are best suited for your apple pie? Well, that depends.

The Best Apples for Baking & Best Apples for Cooking
In the EatingWell Test Kitchen, we’re partial to McIntosh and Granny Smith for baking. When the softer McIntosh mixes with the more toothsome Granny Smith, presto! You’ve got yourself the perfect apple pie….

 

 

McIntosh: The tender white flesh is crisp when freshly harvested, but soon adopts a softer consistency, making it perfect for cooking into pies or sauce. Macs are sweet and juicy with a pleasant tanginess…

Granny Smith: This apple is sharp and tart and its flavor holds up well in recipes with spicy notes; the flesh is firm enough to retain its shape when cooked……

 

 

The Worst Apples for Cooking & Worst Apples for Baking
Red Delicious: These apples are sweet, crisp and grainy. They lack a tart element and a rich apple flavor, which is what makes apple pie so great. You’re better off leaving them out of your pie……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and Eating
http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_and_techniques/types_of_apples_the_best_apples_for_baking_cooking_and_eating

One of America’s Favorites – Apple Pie

June 29, 2015 at 5:28 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment
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Apple pie with lattice upper crust

Apple pie with lattice upper crust

An apple pie is a fruit pie (or tart) in which the principal filling ingredient is apple. It is, on occasion, served with whipped cream or ice cream on top, or alongside cheddar cheese. The pastry is generally used top-and-bottom, making it a double-crust pie, the upper crust of which may be a circular shaped crust or a pastry lattice woven of strips; exceptions are deep-dish apple pie with a top crust only, and open-face TarteTatin.

 
Cooking apples (culinary apples), such as the Bramley, Empire, Northern Spy or Granny Smith, are crisp and acidic. The fruit for the pie can be fresh, canned, or reconstituted from dried apples. This affects the final texture, and the length of cooking time required; whether it has an effect on the flavour of the pie is a matter of opinion. Dried or preserved apples were originally substituted only at times when fresh fruit was unavailable.

Apple Pie is often served in the style of “à la Mode” (topped with ice cream). Alternatively, a piece of cheese (such as a sharp cheddar) is, at times, placed on top of or alongside a slice of the finished pie.

 
English apple pie recipes go back to the time of Chaucer. The 1381 recipe lists the ingredients as good apples, good spices, figs, raisins and pears. The cofyn of the recipe is a casing of pastry. Saffron is used for coloring the pie filling.

In English speaking countries, apple pie is a dessert of enduring popularity, eaten hot or cold, on its own or with ice cream, double cream, or custard.
Most modern recipes for apple pie require an ounce or two of sugar, but the earliest recipe does not. There are two possible reasons for this difference.

Sugarcane imported from Egypt was not widely available in 14th-century England, where it cost between one and two shillings per pound—this is roughly the equivalent of US$100 per kg (about US$46 per pound) in today’s prices.

Honey, which was many times cheaper, is also absent from the recipe, and the “good spices” and saffron, all imported, were no less expensive and difficult to obtain than refined sugar. Despite the expense, refined sugar did appear much more often in published recipes of the time than honey, suggesting that it was not considered prohibitively expensive. With the exception of apples and pears, all the ingredients in the filling probably had to be imported. And perhaps, as in some modern “sugar-free” recipes, the juice of the pears was intended to sweeten the pie.

 
Traditional Dutch apple pie comes in two varieties, a crumb (appelkruimeltaart) and a lattice (appeltaart) style pie. Both recipes are distinct in that they typically call for flavorings such as cinnamon and lemon juice to be added and differ in texture, not taste. Dutch apple pies may include ingredients such as raisins and icing, in addition to ingredients such as apples and sugar, which they have in common with other recipes.

Recipes for Dutch apple pie go back centuries. There exists a painting from the Dutch Golden Age, dated 1626, featuring such a pie. A recipe in a late medieval Dutch cook book ‘Een notabel boecxken van cokeryen’ (from around 1514) is almost identical to modern recipes.

The basis of Dutch apple pie is a crust on the bottom and around the edges. This crust is then filled with pieces or slices of apple, usually a crisp and mildly tart variety such as Goudreinet or Elstar. Cinnamon and sugar are generally mixed in with the apple filling. Atop the filling, strands of dough cover the pie in a lattice holding the filling in place but keeping it visible or cover the pie with crumbs. It can be eaten warm or cold, sometimes with a dash of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. In the US, “Dutch apple pie” refers specifically to the apple pie style with a crumb, streusel, topping.

 
The Swedish style apple pie is predominantly a variety of apple crumble, rather than a traditional pastry pie. Often, breadcrumbs are used (wholly or partially) instead of flour, and sometimes rolled oats. It is usually flavored with cinnamon and served with vanilla custard or ice cream. There is also a very popular version called äppelkaka (apple cake), which differs from the pie in that it is a sponge cake baked with fresh apple pieces in it.

 

 

An apple pie is one of a number of American cultural icons.

An apple pie is one of a number of American cultural icons.

Apple pie was brought to the English colonies by the British, Dutch, and Swedes during the 17th and 18th centuries.

In the English colonies, the apple pie had to wait for the planting of European varieties, brought across the Atlantic, to become fruit-bearing apple trees, to be selected for their cooking qualities as there were no native apples, except the crab apple which yield very small and intensely sour fruit with poor flavor. In the meantime, the colonists were more likely to make their pies, or “pasties”, from meat rather than fruit; and the main use for apples, once they were available, was in cider. However, there are American apple pie recipes, both manuscript and printed, from the 18th century, and it has since become a very popular dessert. Apple varieties are usually propagated by grafting, as clones, but in the New World, planting from seeds was more popular, which quickly led to the development of hundreds of new native varieties.

Apple pie was a common food in 18th-century Delaware. As noted by the New Sweden historian Dr. Israel Acrelius in a letter: “Apple pie is used throughout the whole year, and when fresh Apples are no longer to be had, dried ones are used. It is the evening meal of children.”

A mock apple pie, made from crackers, was possibly invented by pioneers on the move during the 19th century who were bereft of apples. Alternatively, it may have been invented during the American Civil War based on the food shortages experienced by the Southern States. In the 1930s, and for many years afterwards, Ritz Crackers promoted a recipe for mock apple pie using its product, along with sugar and various spices.

Although apple pies have been eaten since long before the European colonisation of the Americas, “as American as apple pie” is a saying in the United States, meaning “typically American”. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, apple pie became a symbol of American prosperity and national pride. A newspaper article published in 1902 declared that “No pie-eating people can be permanently vanquished.” The dish was also commemorated in the phrase “for Mom and apple pie” – supposedly the stock answer of American soldiers in World War II, whenever journalists asked why they were going to war. Jack Holden and Frances Kay sang in their patriotic 1950 song The Fiery Bear, creating contrast between the popular view of the U.S. culture and that of the Soviet Union:

We love our baseball and apple pie
We love our county fair
We’ll keep Old Glory waving high
There’s no place here for a bear
Advertisers exploited the patriotic connection in the 1970s with the commercial jingle “baseball, hot dogs, apple pie and Chevrolet”.

Today, modern American recipes for apple pie usually indicate a confection that is 9 inches in diameter in a fluted pie plate with an apple filling spiced with cinnamon, nutmeg. and lemon juice, and may or may not have a lattice or shapes cut out of the top for decoration. The unincorporated community of Pie Town, New Mexico is named in honor of the apple pie.

 

Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs w/ Baked Potato and Green Beans

July 6, 2014 at 5:15 PM | Posted in Crock Pot, greenbeans, JB's Fatboy Sauces and Rub, Pork, potatoes, ribs | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs w/ Baked Potato and Green Beans

 

 

Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs 006
It’s been a very laid back Sunday around the house. Woke up starving this morning so I made a Breakfast Sandwich along with a cup of hot brewed Decaf Green Tea. Used a toasted Healthy Choice Multi-Grain English Muffin along with a fried slice of Turkey Spam, a slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Sharp Cheddar Cheese, and a (medium size) Scrambled Egg. A delicious way to start the day! Later got in an on-line Scrabble Tournament and that was about it for the afternoon. Yesterday Mom had stopped at the store and brought home some Pork Back Ribs si I knew what I would be preparing for dinner, Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs w/ Baked Potato and Green Beans.

 

 

 

Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs 002
Mom had purchased the Ribs from Kroger. They always have some of the best top quality Pork, too bad their Beef isn’t as good! Last night before I went to bed I cut the Ribs in half, so they’ll fit in the Crock Pot, and put each half in a Hefty Gallon Plastic Bag then covered the Ribs in JB’s Fat Boy Haug Waush BBQ Sauce to marinate all night in the fridge. Then this morning I got out the Crock Pot out, lined it with a Reynold’s Crock Pot Plastic Liner, and sprayed that with Pam Non-Stick Spray. Got the Ribs out of the fridge and the bags, discarded the Hefty Bags, and put the Ribs in the Crock Pot where I let them cook and simmer, on low, for about 8 hours. Long up in the afternoon you can start smelling the aroma of the Ribs, intoxicating! After 8 hours their ready and now for the hard part of cooking them, getting them out whole without breaking them up! Their that tender, when eating them you need no knife, the bones just slide out. Tender, moist and just full of flavor! For all of us here, JB’s Fat Boy Sauces and Rubs can’t be beat. These Ribs are incredible! Plus I love using that Crock Pot, no mess and with the plastic liner in the Crock Pot no clean-up. Just wipe it down and store it for the next time.

 

 

Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs 001
For one side I had the other half of the baked Potato from last night. I made Mom and Dad some Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes. Then I cooked up some fresh Green Beans, we purchased these at a farm out in Ross, Ohio. Then I baked a loaf of Pillsbury Rustic French Bread, I passed on the bread. For dessert later a slice of Mom’s Apple pie, it’s made with Splenda Sugar!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pork Ribspork-back-ribs

 

Pork ribs are a cut of pork popular in North American and Asian cuisines. The ribcage of a domestic pig, meat and bones together, is cut into usable pieces, prepared by smoking, grilling, or baking – usually with a sauce, often barbecue – and then served.
Several different types of ribs are available, depending on the section of rib cage from which they are cut. Variation in the thickness of the meat and bone, as well as levels of fat in each cut, can alter the flavor and texture of the prepared dish. The inner surface of the rib cage is covered by a layer of connective tissue (pleura) that is difficult to cook tender; it is usually removed before marinating or cooking.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 26, 2014 at 5:48 AM | Posted in baking, Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When making an apple pie don’t cut the apples pieces too thin when you are using fresh apples. Larger chunks will hold  together and have more apple flavor.

Our Thanksgiving Meal

November 28, 2013 at 6:09 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Eggs, greenbeans, Ham, Jennie-O Turkey Products, turkey | 3 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Our Thanksgiving Meal

 

 

Thanksgiving Dinner 2013 003

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! We had a quiet day and dinner, just Mom, Dad, and myself. There will be more later in the day and evening coming over. The wind that we’ve had has died down finally but it’s only a high in the low 30’s but it’s sunny out. For dinner tonight; Our Thanksgiving Meal.

 

 

 

 

 

We had Turkey, Ham, Stuffing, and Beans with all the other trimmings in between! I prepared a Jennie – O Oven Ready Turkey Breast. This is the easiest Turkey Breast there is to prepare! Preheat your oven to 375 degrees and remove the frozen Turkey from the outer package. Keep the Turkey in it’s cooking bag and place it in a roasting pan. Roast it for 2 1/2 to 3 hours making sure the Turkey reads at least 170 degrees. You have your Thanksgiving Gobbler! Simple, easy, and delicious.

 

 

 

 

For the Ham we used a Cook’s Bone-In Ham (1/2 Ham). My Mom prepared that last night so it was ready for today’s feast. Then for our side dishes we had; Mashed Potatoes, Brown Gravy, Green Beans (a quart of the Greens Beans we canned earlier in the year), Home Made Stuffing (Mom prepared this), Deviled Eggs, and Baked Rolls. Plus for dessert my Mom baked a couple of pies, a Pumpkin Pie and an Apple Pie. Both were made by using Splenda. I’m not big on Pumpkin Pie but that Apple Pie won’t stand a chance later this evening! For dessert later a slice of Apple Pie with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream! Only one way to describe this, “It was a feast!” Once again Happy Thanksgiving to you all and say a prayer later for our Country and all Military Men and Women serving our country!

 

 

 

 

 

Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Turkey BreastJennie o oven ready

Get all the great benefits of Oven Ready™ in a smaller-sized boneless and skinless turkey breast; this delicious home-cooked turkey breast is the perfect dinner to serve year-round.Goes directly from your freezer to your oven with no thawing.

Product Features:
Gluten Free
The Biggest Loser® product
Preseasoned
Comes sealed in our Fool-Proof® cooking bag
With Gravy Packet (contains gluten)

Cooking Instructions:

OVEN COOKING METHOD:
Preheat oven to 375 °F.
Remove frozen turkey from white outer package.
Do not remove turkey from FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Place in a roasting pan with at least 2″ high sides.
Note – Do not increase oven temperature, cooking bag may melt at higher temperatures.
Cut three 1/2 inch slits in top of FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Place pan in oven, allowing room for bag to expand without touching the oven racks or walls.
Roast the turkey until a meat thermometer reaches 170°F.
Note – Meat temperature increases rapidly during last hour of cooking.
Let turkey rest 10 minutes, cut open top of oven bag.
Watch out for hot steam and juices.
Heat gravy as directed on pouch.

APPROXIMATE OVEN ROASTING TIMES IN 375°F. OVEN TEMPERATURE:
2 – 3 lbs 2-1/2 to 3 hours.
Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g
Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 100 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 10 Sugars 1 g
Total Fat 1.0 g Protein 23 g
Saturated Fat .0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 40 mg Iron 2%
Sodium 460 mg Calcium 0%
Our products are labeled in compliance with government regulations. It is always necessary to read the labels on the products to determine if the food product meets your required needs regardless of how the product is represented on this site.

 

 

http://www.jennieo.com/products/113-OVEN-READY%E2%84%A2-Boneless-Skinless-Turkey-Breast

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