One of America’s Favorites – Anadama Bread

September 4, 2017 at 5:40 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Anadama Bread is a traditional yeast bread of New England in the United States made with wheat flour, cornmeal, molasses and sometimes rye flour.

It is not readily agreed exactly when or where the bread originated, except it existed before 1850 in Rockport,

Anadama bread

Massachusetts. It is thought to have come from the local fishing community, but it may have come through the Finnish community of local stonecutters.

Near the turn of the 20th century, it was baked by a man named Baker Knowlton on King Street in Rockport, Massachusetts, and delivered in a horse-drawn cart to households by men in blue smocks. In the 1940s, a Rockport restaurant owned by Bill and Melissa Smith called The Blacksmith Shop on Mt. Pleasant St. started baking the bread for their restaurant in a small bakery on Main St. They baked about 80 loaves a day until 1956, when they built a modern $250,000 bakery on Pooles Lane. They had 70 employees and 40 trucks which delivered Anadama bread all over New England.

The Anadama Bread center of consumption was in Rockport and next-door Gloucester, Massachusetts. It was commercially available from local bakeries widely on Cape Ann from the early 1900s until 1970, when the Anadama Bread Bakery on Pooles Lane in Rockport closed due to Bill Smith’s death. For a number of years, it was baked by small local bakeries at breakfast places on Cape Ann.

Put in a large mixing bowl 2 cups boiling water and 1/2 cup cornmeal. Stir thoroughly. Let stand one hour. Add 1/2 cup molasses, 2 teaspoons salt, and 1 tablespoon butter. Put in a small bowl 1/2 cup lukewarm water and 1 package yeast. When dissolved, add to the cornmeal. Stir in 4 1/2 cups flour. Beat thoroughly and let rise until double in bulk. Add enough more flour to make the dough just firm enough to knead. Shape into loaves and put into buttered pans. Let rise until almost double. Bake about 50 minutes at 350°. Makes 2 loaves. White flour will make the most “addictive” Anadama, but experiment with whole wheat, rye and other flours to make more healthful loaves.

 

 

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

THE HONEY, I'M HUNGRY BLOG

The Honey, I'm Hungry Blog - Recipes ranging from rustic to refined created to feed the ones we love

We Want Veggies

Join us for recipes, great conversation & meal inspiration!

My Dragonfly Cafe

Creatively Transforming Food

Alissa's Kitchen

I hope you're hungry!

Easy Peasy Foodie

easy, delicious, stress-free, family food

Julie.Nutrition Simple & Tasty

Bien manger sans se priver c'est possible. Eating well without depriving yourself, it's possible

Leaf and Steel

Self - Love - Living

On The Bias

Delicious technique-driven recipes to make at home

Homemaking with Sara

From scratch recipes, and tips for making a house feel like a home.

Adventures in every day life...

I take pictures | I cook | I quilt | I knit | I create

INFONHOWTO.COM

Learning made Easy

Blue Vegan

Compassionate Living

She Lives Naturally

Lifestyle Blogger on her journey to self-sustainable living

Bloom

Come as you are to find practical inspiration for your good days, your hard days and everything in between

Cooking With Alfred

Cooking Without All The Fluff

Jackfruitful Kitchen

vegan - plant based - gluten free

Let's Eat!

Mangiamo!

Tasty Recipes

Amazon affiliate website