Top 25 Power Foods for Diabetes

November 15, 2013 at 9:06 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Another good one from the Diabetic Living On Line web site. It’s all about the Power Foods for Diabetes.

 

Diabetic living logo

Top 25 Power Foods for Diabetes
Including these extra-healthy power foods in your diet will help you meet your nutritional needs as well as lower your risk of diabetes complications such as heart disease. Of course, the foods on this list shouldn’t be the only foods you eat, but incorporating some or all into your diabetes meal plan will help improve your overall health.

 
Are These Power Foods in Your Diet?
If you already follow a healthful meal plan filled with whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies, and lean protein, congratulations! You’re on your way to a long, healthy life and are taking a major step in controlling your weight and blood sugar levels. Plus, you’re probably already eating a bunch of the foods on this list.

For those who are taking the baby-steps approach to eating better, this list is even more helpful. Not only are these power foods high in fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins and minerals, they’re also familiar and easy to find. That means you don’t have to hunt down any exotic ingredients or shop at specialty grocery stores to find foods that will help you get on track with a healthful meal plan.

 

 
Apples
An apple a day keeps the doctor away — specifically the cardiologist. A 2012 study at Ohio State University published in the Journal of Functional Foods found that eating just one apple a day for four weeks lowered LDL (bad) cholesterol by 40 percent. The professor leading the study explained that not all antioxidants are created equal, and that a particular type of antioxidant in apples had a profound effect on lowering LDLs, a contributor to heart disease. The study was funded in part by a grant from the U.S. Apple Association, among other supporters.

This crunchy fruit also appears to offer protection against diabetes. The Harvard School of Public Health examined the diets of 200,000 people and found that those who reported eating five or more apples a week had a 23 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with subjects who did not eat any apples.

More good news: A medium-size apple contains 3 grams of fiber, which includes both soluble and insoluble fiber. How ’bout them apples?

Do remember, however, that one small apple has about 15 grams of carb. Some of the large apples in the grocery store are equivalent to two servings of fruit…..

 

 

 
Asparagus
Based on taste alone, asparagus is a favorite food for many. But you’ll really love that it’s a nonstarchy vegetable with only 5 grams of carb, 20 calories, and almost 2 grams of dietary fiber per serving. It’s especially high in an antioxidant called glutathione, which plays a key role in easing the effects of aging and many diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

One example is the preliminary research reported in 2012 in the British Journal of Nutrition, which suggests that asparagus can help keep blood sugar levels in check and increase insulin production.

Another plus for asparagus is its folate content — a 1/2-cup serving, or about six 1/2-inch spears, provides 33 percent of the 400 micrograms of folate recommended daily. The American Heart Association advises eating foods containing folate and other B vitamins to help lower homocysteine levels, a risk factor for coronary heart disease……

 

 
* Click the link below to get all the Top 25 Power Foods for Diabetes 8

 

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/nutrition/top-25-power-foods-diabetes?sssdmh=dm17.701069&esrc=nwdlo110513

Fish on the grill

June 28, 2013 at 9:26 AM | Posted in fish, grilling | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A very good article on one of my favorite grill items, Fish! I left the link at the bottom of the page.

 

Fish on the grill
Cook fish in your backyard. Grill prep starts the process.

BY JANE SCHREIER JONES – CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Fire up the barbie — but, please, not for an artery-clogging beef steak. Instead, prepare fish on your backyard grill for a tasty and quite healthy meal.

Wow your family and even party guests with main courses chockfull of flavor and flair, such as barbecue salmon, fish tacos, tuna steaks, grilled tilapia and other scene-stealers.

All types of seafood can provide the thrill of the grill, say those-in-the-know. “But firmer fish such as salmon, halibut, trout, walleye, swordfish and tuna are easier to manage on a backyard grill,” points out Aleda Zink, owner of Dayton Fish Co., on North Main Street in Dayton.

“Scallops are fun and easy to grill because they are meatier and don’t fall apart,” points out Executive Chef Michelle Brown of Jag’s Steak and Seafood on West Chester Road in West Chester. “With scallops, the more caramelization the better, so don’t be afraid to use high heat.”

Great backyard seafood dishes start with proper grill prep. “Fish likes to stick to grill grates so make sure you have a clean grill to start, by heating it and using a metal brush to remove particles,” advises Matt Klum, executive chef at Jay’s Seafood Restaurant in Dayton’s Oregon District.

Klum recommends using tongs to rub a hot grill down with paper towel soaked in canola or vegetable oil — but do so cautiously. “Because you’re doing this while the fire’s hot, you’ll get some flare up, but use long tongs,” he says. There’s also a Pam for Grilling spray for the less adventurous.

Keep seafood refrigerated before cooking, of course. Klum says fish does not need to be washed; just dry it off with paper towels before seasoning it and rubbing it with a little bit of olive oil. “Let the seafood sit for a few minutes before putting it on the hot grill,” he says.

“I like to marinate fish in Italian dressing or another product before grilling,” says Zink. “That helps with the sticking and adds flavor.”

How long to grill fish? Zink says the rule of thumb is 10 to 15 minutes for each inch of thickness. “Flip it just once,” she says.

“For flakier fish, such as sea bass or halibut, prepare a foil pocket with the fish, herbs, lemon and olive oil,” says Michelle Brown. “Cook it on the grill, but not on the hottest part of the grill. Keep the lid shut. Ten minutes at 450 t0 500 degrees should do it.”

 

 

 

TERIYAKI SALMON

4 salmon steaks (about 6 oz each), skinned, or 1 to 1.5 lbs fillet, skinned

1¼ cups soy sauce

1/3 cup sake (Japanese rice wine) or mirin (sweet Japanese cooking wine)

6 Tablespoons granulated sugar

3 cloves garlic, minced or pressed

1 Tablespoon minced or grated ginger root

1/3 cup vegetable oil

Combine all the ingredients for the marinade in a small bowl and stir until the sugar dissolves. To prepare the salmon: quickly rinse under cold running water and pat dry with paper towels. Divide each steak into 2 pieces by cutting along either side of the central bone and then discarding the bone; alternatively, cut the fillet into 8 equal pieces.

Place the salmon in a shallow glass or ceramic container and pour 1 cup of the marinade over the fish. Cover and refrigerate for 2 hours, turning the fish occasionally. Let the salmon come to room temperature before cooking.

Prepare grill. Remove the salmon from the marinade, reserving the marinade. Place the fish on an oiled grill rack. Position the fish 5 to 6 inches from the heat source, turning once and brushing with the reserved marinade several times, until the flesh is just opaque, 3 to 5 minutes per side, depending on thickness. Serve the salmon at once with reserved marinade as dipping sauce. Makes 4 servings.

Source: Dorothy Lane Market

 

Fish school

Facts about fish and nutrition:

• Seafood is a great source of protein, high in heart-healthy essential Omega-3 fatty acids.

• It’s naturally low in fat, calories and carbs.

• Decades of research show that eating seafood can decrease your risk of obesity, heart attack and stroke.

• Four major health organizations including The American Heart Association recommend eating seafood twice a week.

• Americans are not eating enough seafood. We’re eating about 3.5 ounces per week, half what the USDA recommends.

 

http://www.mydaytondailynews.com/news/lifestyles/fish-on-the-grill/nYS8D/

The Perfect Protein: The Fish Lover’s Guide to Saving the Oceans and Feeding the World

June 13, 2013 at 11:05 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, fish, seafood | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Ran across this article out of the Huffington Post. I left the link at the bottom of the post.

 

The Perfect Protein: The Fish Lover’s Guide to Saving the Oceans and Feeding the World

 

The following is an excerpt from The Perfect Protein: The Fish Lover’s Guide to Saving the Oceans and Feeding the World, by Andrew Sharpless and Suzannah Evans.

 

In his foreword, Bill Clinton wrote:

The specter of ever-growing numbers of hungry people, especially malnourished children, hangs over our heads. Already, close to 1 billion people go to bed hungry. I’ve never heard anyone else propose the simple solution Andy Sharpless and Oceana are making here: to replicate the success we’ve had in the United States by putting in place effective, conservation focused, scientific fisheries management in the 25 countries that control most of the world’s seafood catch. This is — relatively speaking — a practical, inexpensive, and quick way to make sure our planet has lots more nutritious food in the future, when we’ll really need it.
But is eating fish really such a healthy and sustainable food source? The Perfect Protein explains why we should all be eating more seafood — for our own health and that of the oceans.


It’s the one animal protein that’s rarely mentioned in the endless reports about big agriculture and hunger crises. It’s the protein that’s healthiest for your body: low in cholesterol, brimming with brain-boosting omega-3 fatty acids and nutrients like riboflavin, iron, and calcium. It’s one of the most ancient foods, and it’s most likely the last wild creature that you’ll eat, the last pure exchange between Earth and your dinner plate.

Seafood’s role in heart health was discovered after early 20th century studies on Arctic peoples. Soon, other indicators emerged suggesting that seafood was helpful in avoiding heart disease. Norway experienced a steep decline in fatal heart attacks during the German occupation of 1941 to 1945. In these years, Norwegians could not obtain much in the way of meat, eggs, or whole milk, and instead began eating more fish, skim milk, and cereals. After the war, Norwegians returned to their red-meat diet, and the rate of heart attacks rose again.

Similarly, scientists began to notice that the Japanese, who eat up to 13 times as much seafood as Americans, had much lower rates of heart disease as well. One study found that the Japanese were 20 times less likely than Germans to die of heart attacks.

One of the landmark studies on seafood consumption and heart health took place in the Netherlands from 1960 to 1980. Over those two decades, scientists tracked a group of adult men from the town of Zutphen who ate a consistent amount of fish throughout their lives. The result? The more fish the men ate, the less likely they were to die of heart disease. After the results of the Zutphen study were published in 1985, the knowledge of seafood’s role in heart health went mainstream. Now, just about every authority from the American Heart Association to the World Health Organization recommends eating seafood at least twice a week.

Since the 1980s, “omega-3” has been a nutrition buzzword, found everywhere from margarine labels to fad diet cookbooks. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in some plants, like walnuts, but the best sources are fish and seafood. They, too, ultimately derive their omega-3s from plants — the phytoplankton that support all ocean life.

The more important nutritional benefits that we get from consuming omega-3s come from two types of omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These are found almost exclusively in marine sources and egg yolk, and yet they are critical to our health, having particular importance in fetal development and maintenance of brain, retina, heart, and immune system health.

Scientists now agree that consuming omega-3-rich seafood two times a week can cut your chance of dying from a heart attack by 30 percent or more.

Seafood is also the only food with which we still have — mostly — the same hunter-trapper relationship as early hominids cracking open clamshells. We may be evolutionarily disposed to enjoying seafood, but as our population has grown and grown, our collective appetite for wild-caught seafood has outstripped the oceans’ ability to provide it — and there’s no question that we can’t afford to decimate all wild seafood.

Fish and shellfish are integral parts of our diets, and they should be. And they don’t come with the massive baggage of industrial pork, poultry, and beef, animal proteins that produce tons of waste and pollution, destroy thousands of acres of land, use huge amounts of water, and are often too costly for the world’s poorest people. The modern industrial agricultural system has mechanized food production in a way that’s nothing short of awe inspiring for sheer effort. But we’re paying a huge, often hidden price. And our planet may not be able to conceal the true costs of agriculture much longer.

When people ask us which seafood is sustainable, it’s hard to give such a pithy response. But if you really pressed us for it, this is what we might say: “Eat wild seafood. Not too much of the big fish. Mostly local.”

 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/andrew-sharpless/perfect-protein-book-excerpt_b_3429390.html?utm_hp_ref=@food123

Top 20 Power Foods for Diabetes

June 21, 2011 at 8:59 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, fruits, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

I had been showing  articles from Diabetic Living On Line on 15 Foods that were bad for Diabetes and now I’ll be showing articles on the Top 20 Power Foods for Diabetes and some healthy recipes along with it. All from: http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

By Lori Brookhart-Schervish; Contributing writer Marsha McCulloch, RD; Reviewed by Connie Crawley, RD, LD, 2009

Including these extra-healthy power foods in your diet will help you meet your nutritional needs as well as lower your risk of diabetes complications such as heart disease. Of course, the foods on this list shouldn’t be the only foods you eat, but incorporating some or all into your diabetes meal plan will help improve your overall health.

Are These Power Foods in Your Diet?

If you already follow a healthful meal plan filled with whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies, and lean protein, congratulations! You’re on your way to a long, healthy life and are taking a major step in controlling your weight and blood glucose levels. Plus, you’re probably already eating a bunch of the foods on this list.

For those who are taking the baby-steps approach to eating better, this list is even more helpful. Not only are these power foods high in fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins and minerals, they’re also familiar and easy to find. That means you don’t have to hunt down any exotic ingredients or shop at specialty grocery stores to find foods that will help you get on track with a healthful meal plan.

#11 Melon

A dessert straight from nature, melons come in many varieties including watermelon, cantaloupe, muskmelon, honeydew, casaba, crenshaw, Persian, and pepino.

While all provide good nutrients, watermelon is high in vitamins C and B6 and is a good source of the antioxidant lycopene, which may help protect against cancer, says nutritionist Jeannette Jordan. Lycopene is commonly associated with tomatoes and tomato juice, but watermelon is another optimal source. Watermelon is also high in beta-carotene, which the body uses to make vitamin A.

Honeydew is high in vitamin C and a good source of potassium, which can help improve or maintain blood pressure, according to the Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide Online. Check with a health-care professional before increasing potassium intake if you have kidney complications or kidney disease.

Cantaloupe is also high in potassium and the antioxidant beta-carotene, and it’s a good source of fiber, vitamin C, and folate. The American Heart Association recommends getting enough folate and other B vitamins in your diet to help lower homocysteine levels, which may help decrease the risk of heart disease.

Tips for choosing the best melon:

Watermelon should be firm and without bruising or dents. Store whole melons at room temperature for up to 10 days. One serving is 1 slice or 1-1/4 cups cubed.

Honeydew should feel heavy, have a slight scent, and not have bruising or softness. One serving is 1 slice or 1 cup cubed.

Cantaloupe should have well-defined netting, feel heavy, and have a strong smell. Store cantaloupes away from other foods to avoid crossing flavors. One serving is 1/3 of a melon or 1 cup cubed.

Marinated Melon
A splash of white balsamic vinegar in berry-flavor sparkling water gives low-fat, low-calorie melon balls a company-special twist.
CARB GRAMS PER SERVING: 11

1/2     cup calorie-free sparkling water with berry flavor
3     tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
4     cups assorted melon balls
Fresh lemon verbena (optional)

1. In a medium bowl, combine sparkling water and white balsamic vinegar; add melon balls. Toss gently to coat. Cover and chill for 2 to 4 hours or until ready to serve.

2. Divide melon mixture among six dessert glasses or bowls. If desired, garnish with lemon verbena. Makes 6 servings

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:

* Calories47
* Total Fat (g)0
* Saturated Fat (g)0
* Cholesterol (mg)0
* Sodium (mg)16
* Carbohydrate (g)11
* Fiber (g)1
* Protein (g)1
* Vitamin A (DV%)0
* Vitamin C (DV%)0
* Calcium (DV%)0
* Iron (DV%)0
Diabetic Exchanges
* Fruit (d.e.).5

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Kitoloves

Online magazine

Cat Among the Pilchards

A pescetarian/vegetarian food blog

The Artful Gourmet :: Food Stylist | Photographer | Blogger | Recipe Writer

Celebrating the art of food & cooking through colorful recipes, stories and photography

Katie Drane Blog

Homestyle Recipes

Midwest mattie

just living my best life in the midwest.

Justine Snacks

eat what you want

Bake on Through to the Other Side

Chronicling my attempt to bake and cook through my extensive recipe collection.

Beki's list of lists

an oversharer, problem solver making lists about anything and everything!

THINKING A BAO FOOD

EASY + HEALTHY(ISH) + DELICIOUS + FOOD RECIPES

Non-Harm City

Elevated eating

Little Girl, Big Eats

I may seem small, but my appetite is huge!

At Home with Pearl

Sharing my passion at home - cooking, baking, home style, and more.

A Likes Applesauce:

Easy and delicious recipes.. for those of us that don’t particularly like cooking

Little Miss Made from Scratch

My Favorite Recipes!