Roasted Squash Bisque with Pistachios

November 14, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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Here’s a recipe for a Roasted Squash Bisque with Pistachios. To make this recipe you’ll be using Winter Squash, Fat Free Low Sodium, Chicken Broth, Pistachio Nuts, Black Pepper, Allspice, and Fat-Free Evaporated Milk. The Bisque is 74 calories and 12 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Roasted Squash Bisque with Pistachios
Ingredients
Preparation time: 35 minutes

1 winter squash (Hubbard, butternut, or acorn), approximately 2 pounds
2 cups fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons roasted pistachio nuts (without shells)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1 can (5 ounces) fat-free evaporated milk

Directions
Yield: 4 1/2 cups
Serving size: 3/4 cup

1 – Preheat oven to 375°F. Cut the squash in half and scoop out seeds. Place squash halves on baking sheet, cut-side down. Prick the skin of the squash with a sharp knife. Bake for approximately one hour until flesh is tender. Cool slightly. Scoop out 3 cups of cooked squash and place it in a blender or food processor. (Save any extra squash for another use.) Add some of the chicken broth to aid in blending. Sprinkle pistachio nuts, pepper, and allspice into the food processor or blender. Process until smooth and nuts are ground. When squash is smooth, pour into a large saucepan with remaining broth. Heat over low heat, stirring constantly until mixture comes to a slow boil. Stir in evaporated milk and continue to heat until soup bubbles and is heated through. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 74 calories, Carbohydrates: 15 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: 0 g, Sodium: 71 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/roasted-squash-bisque-with-pistachios/

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Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Diabetic Spiced Baked Apples Recipe

October 1, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is a Diabetic Spiced Baked Apples Recipe. It’s Fall and to start it off I have a Diabetic Spiced Baked Apples Recipe. This Delicious Dessert is made using Large Baking Apples, Sweetened Dried Cranberries, Raisins, Unsweetened Apple Juice, and Allspice. Enjoy the Recipe and have an incredible Fall! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Diabetic Spiced Baked Apples Recipe
Nothing says autumn quite like apples. Requiring just five ingredients, these baked apples are a quick, easy and healthy treat, perfect for dessert or a midday snack. So heat up the oven and get ready to fill your home with the delicious and cozy scent of allspice!

Ingredients
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Baking time: 45 minutes

4 large baking apples (approximately 9 ounces each)
2 tablespoons sweetened dried cranberries
2 tablespoons raisins
3/4 cup unsweetened apple juice
1/2 teaspoon allspice

Directions
Yield: 4 apples
Serving size: 1/2 apple

1 – Preheat oven to 375°F. Remove the core of each apple, leaving 1/2 inch flesh at bottom. Place cored apples in an 8″ x 8″ baking dish. Fill each apple with 1/2 tablespoon cranberries and 1/2 tablespoon raisins. Fill apples half full of apple juice and pour remaining juice around them in the pan. Sprinkle apples evenly with allspice. Cover and bake for 45 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Spoon remaining baking juices over the apples and serve hot or chilled.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 96 calories, Carbohydrates: 24 g, Protein: 0 g, Fat: 0 g, Saturated Fat: 0 g, Sodium: 0 g, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/snack/spiced-baked-apples/

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Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Fall Fruit Compote

September 20, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is a Fall Fruit Compote. Nothing but good things in this recipe! To make the dish you’ll be needing; Pears, Apples, Seedless Grapes, Bananas, Dark Raisins, Orange Zest, Dried Pears, Cinnamon, Allspice, Nutmeg, and Orange Juice. Starting the Fall Season off right! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Fall Fruit Compote
Ring in the arrival of autumn with this delightful dessert!

Ingredients
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 20–25 minutes.

2 ripe pears, cut in small chunks, unpeeled
2 apples, cored and cut in small chunks, unpeeled
1 cup seedless grapes
1 medium-size ripe banana, sliced
1/2 cup dark raisins
1/4 cup golden raisins
3 dried pear halves, chopped
Grated zest from skin of 1 orange
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
3/4 cup orange juice

Directions
Yield: about 6 cups
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – Combine all ingredients in a large pot and stir. Simmer over low heat 20 to 25 minutes or until fruit is tender. Serve warm or cold.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 102 calories, Carbohydrates: 26 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: <1 g, Sodium: 2 g, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/snack/fall-fruit-compote/

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* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes

August 2, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | 1 Comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is a Twice-Baked Sweet Potato. These Delicious Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes are made using Sweet Potatoes, Reduced Calorie Margarine, Brown Sugar Substitute, Ground Cinnamon, Allspice, Nutmeg, Crushed Pineapple, Walnuts, and Mini Marshmallows. These are some kicked up Sweet Taters! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes
Put the fall’s harvest to good use with this classic side dish. With its combination of cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, chopped walnuts, and miniature marshmallows, this casserole is so delightful, you won’t even need dessert.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Baking time: approximately 1 hour and 10 minutes
Cooling time: 15 minutes

4 sweet potatoes (8 ounces each), unpeeled
1 tablespoon reduced-calorie margarine
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar substitute
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 can (8 ounces) crushed pineapple, canned in juice
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
I cup miniature marshmallows

Directions
Yield: 8 stuffed potato halves
Serving size: 1 stuffed potato half

1 – Preheat oven to 400˚F. Wrap each sweet potato in foil, place on oven rack, and bake for one hour, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and allow to cool 15 minutes. Cut each potato in half lengthwise and carefully scoop flesh into a bowl, leaving shells intact with 1/8–1/4 inch of flesh. Place shells in a baking dish and set aside. Using an electric mixer, mash flesh until smooth. Mix in margarine, brown sugar substitute, and spices. Drain pineapple well in a sieve, forcing out extra liquid with the back of a spoon. Stir drained pineapple into mashed sweet potatoes. Spoon filling into shells; sprinkle with walnuts and press on marshmallows. Return to the oven for 8–10 minutes, or until marshmallows are lightly toasted and potato is heated through.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 174 calories, Carbohydrates: 36 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Sodium: 37 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/twice-baked-sweet-potatoes/

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Diabetic Dessert of the Week -Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread

October 17, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread. What better Dessert for the Fall Season than a Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread! This Diabetic Friendly Dessert Recipe is only 142 calories and 9 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News, and more! So be sure to check it out soon. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread
With only 142 calories and 10 grams of carbohydrate per serving, this scrumptious, low-carb bread is the perfect way to end your hectic day. Curl up on the couch and enjoy with a mug of tea or cocoa for a relaxing treat.

Preparation time: 10 minutes. Baking time: 50 minutes.

Ingredients
Nonstick cooking spray
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granular
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup pumpkin puree
1/2 cup canola oil
1 whole egg
1 egg white
1/3 cup water
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice

Directions
Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a 9″ x 5″ x 3″ loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray. In a large mixing bowl, combine all ingredients in the order listed, stirring after each addition. Stir only enough to combine ingredients into a smooth batter. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 45–50 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Yield: 10 servings.

Serving size: 1/10th of a loaf.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 142 calories, Carbohydrates: 10 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 21 mg, Sodium: 292 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/whole-wheat-pumpkin-bread/

Pepper of the Week – Allspice

November 26, 2015 at 5:51 AM | Posted in Pepper of the Week | Leave a comment
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Whole allspice berries

Whole allspice berries

Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper, pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, Turkish Yenibahar, English pepper or newspice, is the dried unripe fruit (berries, used as a spice) of Pimenta dioica, a midcanopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world. The name ‘allspice’ was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.

Several unrelated fragrant shrubs are called “Carolina allspice” (Calycanthus floridus), “Japanese allspice” (Chimonanthus praecox), or “wild allspice” (Lindera benzoin). Allspice is also sometimes used to refer to the herb costmary (Tanacetum balsamita).

 
Allspice is the dried fruit of the P. dioica plant. The fruits are picked when green and unripe and are traditionally dried in the sun. When dry, they are brown and resemble large brown smooth peppercorns. The whole fruits have a longer shelf life than the powdered product and produce a more aromatic product when freshly ground before use.

Fresh leaves are used where available. They are similar in texture to bay leaves and are thus infused during cooking and then removed before serving. Unlike bay leaves, they lose much flavor when dried and stored, so do not figure in commerce. The leaves and wood are often used for smoking meats where allspice is a local crop. Allspice can also be found in essential oil form.

 
Allspice is one of the most important ingredients of Caribbean cuisine. It is used in Caribbean jerk seasoning (the wood is used to smoke jerk in Jamaica, although the spice is a good substitute), in moles, and in pickling; it is also an ingredient in commercial sausage preparations and curry powders. Allspice is also indispensable in Middle Eastern cuisine, particularly in the Levant, where it is used to flavor a variety of stews and meat dishes. In Palestinian cuisine, for example, many main dishes call for allspice as the sole spice added for flavouring. In the U.S., it is used mostly in desserts, but it is also responsible for giving Cincinnati-style chili its distinctive aroma and flavor. Allspice is commonly used in Great Britain, and appears in many dishes, including cakes. Even in many countries where allspice is not very popular in the household, as in Germany, it is used in large amounts by commercial sausage makers. It is a main flavor used in barbecue sauces. In the West Indies, an allspice liqueur called “pimento dram” is produced.

Allspice has also been used as a deodorant. Volatile oils found in the plant contain eugenol, a weak antimicrobial agent.

 

 

Allspice blooming twig, flower & fruit detail

Allspice blooming twig, flower & fruit detail

The allspice tree, classified as an evergreen shrub, can reach 10–18 m (33–59 ft) in height. Allspice can be a small, scrubby tree, quite similar to the bay laurel in size and form. It can also be a tall, canopy tree, sometimes grown to provide shade for coffee trees planted underneath it. It can be grown outdoors in the tropics and subtropics with normal garden soil and watering. Smaller plants can be killed by frost, although larger plants are more tolerant. It adapts well to container culture and can be kept as a houseplant or in a greenhouse.

To protect the pimenta trade, the plant was guarded against export from Jamaica. Many attempts at growing the pimenta from seeds were reported, but all failed. At one time, the plant was thought to grow nowhere except in Jamaica, where the plant was readily spread by birds. Experiments were then performed using the constituents of bird droppings; however, these were also totally unsuccessful. Eventually, passage through the avian gut, whether due to the acidity or the elevated temperature, was found to be essential for germinating the seeds. Today, pimenta is spread by birds in Tonga and Hawaii, where it has become naturalized on Kauaʻi and Maui.

 
Allspice (P. dioica) was encountered by Christopher Columbus on the island of Jamaica during his second voyage to the New World, and named by Dr. Diego Álvarez Chanca. It was introduced into European and Mediterranean cuisines in the 16th century. It continued to be grown primarily in Jamaica, though a few other Central American countries produced allspice in comparatively small quantities.

 

Herb and Spice of the Week – Allspice

May 8, 2014 at 8:41 AM | Posted in spices and herbs | Leave a comment
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Allspice

Allspice

The past few months on Thursdays I’ve been doing articles on different Grains. I covered most of them so I’m moving on to Herbs and Spices, starting with Allspice.

 

 

Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper, pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta, pimento, English pepper or newspice, is the dried unripe fruit (“berries”, used as a spice) of Pimenta dioica, a midcanopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world. The name ‘allspice’ was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.

Several unrelated fragrant shrubs are called “Carolina allspice” (Calycanthus floridus), “Japanese allspice” (Chimonanthus praecox), or “wild allspice” (Lindera benzoin). Allspice is also sometimes used to refer to the herb costmary (Tanacetum balsamita).

 

 

 
Allspice is the dried fruit of the P. dioica plant. The fruit are picked when green and unripe and are traditionally dried in the sun. When dry, they are brown and resemble large brown peppercorns. The whole fruit have a longer shelf life than the powdered product and produce a more aromatic product when freshly ground before use.

Fresh leaves are used where available. They are similar in texture to bay leaves and are thus infused during cooking and then removed before serving. Unlike bay leaves, they lose much flavour when dried and stored, so do not figure in commerce. The leaves and wood are often used for smoking meats where allspice is a local crop. Allspice can also be found in essential oil form.

 

 

 

Whole allspice berries

Whole allspice berries

Allspice is one of the most important ingredients of Caribbean cuisine. It is used in Caribbean jerk seasoning (the wood is used to smoke jerk in Jamaica, although the spice is a good substitute), in moles, and in pickling; it is also an ingredient in commercial sausage preparations and curry powders. Allspice is also indispensable in Middle Eastern cuisine, particularly in the Levant, where it is used to flavor a variety of stews and meat dishes. In Palestinian cuisine, for example, many main dishes call for allspice as the sole spice added for flavoring. In the U.S., it is used mostly in desserts, but it is also responsible for giving Cincinnati-style chili its distinctive aroma and flavor. Allspice is commonly used in Great Britain, and appears in many dishes, including cakes. Even in many countries where allspice is not very popular in the household, as in Germany, it is used in large amounts by commercial sausage makers. It is a main flavor used in barbecue sauces. In the West Indies, an allspice liqueur called “pimento dram” is produced.

Allspice has also been used as a deodorant. Volatile oils found in the plant contain eugenol, a weak antimicrobial agent.

 

 

 
The allspice tree, classified as an evergreen shrub, reaches heights between 32 and 60 ft. Allspice can be a small, scrubby tree, quite similar to the bay laurel in size and form. It can also be a tall, canopy tree, sometimes grown to provide shade for coffee trees planted underneath it. It can be grown outdoors in the tropics and subtropics with normal garden soil and watering. Smaller plants can be killed by frost, although larger plants are more tolerant. It adapts well to container culture and can be kept as a houseplant or in a greenhouse.

To protect the pimenta trade, the plant was guarded against export from Jamaica. Many attempts at growing the pimenta from seeds were reported, but all failed. At one time, the plant was thought to grow nowhere except in Jamaica, where the plant was readily spread by birds. Experiments were then performed using the constituents of bird droppings; however, these were also totally unsuccessful. Eventually, passage through the avian gut, either the acidity or the elevated temperature, was found to be essential for germinating the seeds. Today, pimenta is spread by birds in Tonga and Hawaii, where it has become naturalized on Kauaʻi and Maui.

 

 

 

 

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