Grilled Bratts, Turkey Franks, Italian Turkey Sausage, and Pork Patties

May 3, 2013 at 4:55 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, Bob Evan's, grilling, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, Hot Dogs | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Grilled Bratts, Turkey Franks, Italian Turkey Sausage, and Pork PattiesGrilling Hot Dogs 005

 

Another beautiful sunny day outside again! I fired the grill up for myself and some friends who were in town. I grilled up some Bratts, Turkey Franks, Italian Turkey Sausage, and Pork Patties.

 

 

I used Queen City brand Bratts, Ball Park Turkey Franks, Honeysuckle White Italian Turkey Sausage, and Bob Evans Original Pork Sandwich Patties. I made a side of Tossed salad and also had Ruffles Light Potato Chips. Love these Chips only 80 calories and 17 carbs per serving! I made some Chip Dip using Daisy Reduced Fat Sour Cream and Hidden Valley Ranch Dip Mix. For dessert later tonight for myself, Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding. Well I’m off to catch up with some old friends. Have a great weekend!

 

A Little History of: Cincinnati Chili

March 5, 2013 at 5:46 PM | Posted in chili, Hot Dogs, Skyline Chili, spaghetti | 2 Comments
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Cincinnati chili (or “Cincinnati-style chili”) is a regional style of chili con carne characterized by the use of seasonings such as

A Cincinnati chili 4-way with oyster crackers

A Cincinnati chili 4-way with oyster crackers

cinnamon, cloves, allspice or chocolate. It is commonly served over spaghetti or as a hot dog sauce, and is normally of a thin, sauce-like consistency, unlike most chili con carne. While served in many regular restaurants, it is most often associated with several restaurant chains, such as Empress Chili, Skyline Chili, Gold Star Chili, Camp Washington Chili and Dixie Chili. Restaurant locations are found pervasively in greater Cincinnati with franchise locations also throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida. Restaurants that feature Cincinnati chili are frequently called “chili parlors”.
According to the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau, Cincinnatians consume more than two million pounds of chili each year, topped by 850,000 pounds of shredded cheddar cheese. Each September, the city celebrates “Chilifest” at Yeatman’s Cove on the Ohio River, with food and entertainment.

 

Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on this ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, grated cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Thus, customers can order a:

 

Bowl: chili in a bowl
Two-way: chili and spaghetti
Three-way: chili, spaghetti, and cheese
Four-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and onions
Five-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, onions, and beans
and optionally, the:
Four-way bean: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and beans (beans substituted for the onions)
The preceding basic menu is entirely traditional. Some chili parlors have altered the traditional menu method, declaring on their menus that a Four-way is chili, spaghetti, cheese, and either onions or beans. Other parlors have added ingredients to the traditional mix. For example, Dixie Chili offers a “Six-way” with the addition of garlic. Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili, and a mild hot sauce is frequently used as an optional topping.
When served on a Coney style hot dog, dubbed the “Cheese Coney“, the chili is also topped with grated cheddar cheese. The default coney also includes mustard and a small amount of onion.

 

Cincinnati chili seems to have originated with one or more immigrant restaurateurs from Macedonia who were trying to broaden their customer base by moving beyond narrowly ethnic styles of cuisine. Tom and John Kiradjieff began serving the chili in 1922 at their hot dog stand, next to a burlesque theater called the Empress, after which their Empress chili parlor took its name. Tom Kiradjieff invented the style by modifying a traditional stew and serving it over hot dogs and spaghetti. The style has since been copied and modified by many other restaurant proprietors.
Empress was the main chili parlor in Cincinnati until 1949, when a former Empress employee and Greek immigrant, Nicholas Lambrinides, started another chili restaurant called Skyline Chili. Gold Star Chili came along in 1965, started by the four Daoud brothers who were originally from Jordan.

One of America’s Favorites – the Corn Dog

September 4, 2012 at 2:13 PM | Posted in Hot Dogs | Leave a comment
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A corn dog is a hot dog sausage coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter and deep fried in oil, although some are baked. Almost all

Corn Dog on a stick

corn dogs are served on wooden sticks, though some early versions had no stick.

There is some debate as to the exact origins of the corn dog; they appeared in some ways in the US by the 1920s, and were popularized nationally in the 1940s. A US patent filed in 1927, granted in 1929, for a Combined Dipping, Cooking, and Article Holding Apparatus, describes corn dogs, among other fried food impaled on a stick; it reads in part:
“I have discovered that articles of food such, for instance, as wieners, boiled ham, hard boiled eggs, cheese, sliced peaches, pineapples, bananas and like fruit, and cherries, dates, figs, strawberries, etc., when impaled on sticks and dipped in batter, which includes in its ingredients a self rising flour, and then deep fried in a vegetable oil at a temperature of about 390°F., the resultant food product on a stick for a handle is a clean, wholesome and tasty refreshment.”

In 300 Years of Kitchen Collectibles, author Linda Campbell Franklin states that a “Krusty Korn Dog baker” machine appeared in the 1929 Albert Pick-L. Barth wholesale catalog of hotel and restaurant supplies. The ‘korn dogs’ were baked in a corn batter and resembled ears of corn when cooked.

A number of current corn dog vendors lay claim that credit for the invention and/or popularization of the corn dog. Carl and Neil Fletcher lay such a claim, having introduced their “Corny Dogs” at the Texas State Fair sometime between 1938 and 1942. The Pronto Pup vendors at the Minnesota State Fair claim to have invented the corn dog in 1941. Cozy Dog Drive-in, in Springfield, Illinois, claims to have been the first to serve corn dogs on sticks, on June 16, 1946. Also in 1946, Dave Barham opened the first location of Hot Dog on a Stick at Muscle Beach, Santa Monica, California.

Corn dogs are often served as street food or as fast food. Some vendors or restaurateurs dip and fry their dogs just before serving. Corn

Corn dog (cross section)

dogs can also be found at almost any supermarket in North America as frozen food that can be heated and served. Some corn dog purveyors sell these premade frozen corn dogs which have been thawed and then fried again or browned in an oven. Premade frozen corn dogs can also be microwaved, but the cornbread coating will lack texture.[8][9] Corn dogs may be eaten plain or with a variety of condiments, such as ketchup, mustard, relish and mayonnaise.

Both vegetarian corn dogs and corn dog nuggets are made as meatless alternatives by many of the same companies that produce veggie dogs.
A breakfast version of the corn dog consists of a breakfast sausage deep-fried in a pancake batter.
In Argentina they are called panchukers and are sold mostly around train stations, and are more popular in the inner country cities. They are often consumed on the street, and may contain cheese. They are served with a number of sauces.
In Australia, a hot dog sausage on a stick, deep fried in batter, is known as a Dagwood Dog, Pluto Pup or Dippy Dog, depending on region.[citation needed] Variants exist that use wheat-based or corn-based batters.[10] These are not to be confused with the British and Australian battered sav, a saveloy deep fried in a wheat flour based batter, as used for fish and chips, which generally does not contain cornmeal.[11] In New Zealand and South Korea, a similar battered sausage on a stick is called a “hot dog”, whereas a “frankfurter” sausage in a long bun is referred to as an “American hot dog”.
In Japan, something like a corn dog can be found at many supermarkets and convenience stores as “American Dogs” for their American origin. These American Dogs, however use a wheat-flour based batter with no cornmeal at all.
In Canada, corn dogs may be referred to as “pogo sticks”, or “pogos”, after a popular brand name.
Another version comes with either melted cheese between the hot dog and the breading or the hot dog is replaced with a cheese-filled hot dog.
Yet another version is the “cornbrat” (or “corn brat”), which is a corn dog made with bratwurst instead of a wiener or hot dog.
Hot dogs can also so be covered in a potato and egg coating; fried and served on a stick like a corn dog. In effect, the cornbread component is replaced with a latke.
Small corn dogs, known as “corn puppies,” “mini corn dogs,” or “corn dog nuggets,” are a variation served in some restaurants, generally on the children’s menu or at fast food establishments. A serving includes multiple pieces, usually 10. In contrast to their larger counterparts, corn puppies are normally served stickless as finger food.

National Corndog Day is a celebration of the corn dog, tater tots, and American beer that occurs on the first Saturday of March of every year.

American hot dog revolution

July 4, 2012 at 12:32 PM | Posted in Food, Hot Dogs | Leave a comment
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American hot dog revolution
Let’s be frank: Nowadays, it’s what’s on top that inspires a region

 

Written by
Polly Campbell

 

Any list of All-American foods being prepared this Independence Day would have to include the hot dog. It’s a friendly little dish that’s easy to grill, cheap to buy and beloved across the country.

You know what else is All-American? Ingenuity – and taking a good thing and making it better.

That’s what’s been happening to hot dogs lately, as chefs at all levels get creative with the tube steak. They’re topping them with ingredients that likely have never shared a bun with a frank.

At Senate Restaurant on Vine Street in Over-the-Rhine’s Gateway District, they make a new hot dog every day and name it after whatever pop buzz is in the air.

At nearby Tot Dogs, they expand the repertoire by offering Italian, chicken and andouille dogs along with salsas, slaws and all kinds of cheeses.

The Good Dog on Main Street, Downtown, starts with old-fashioned natural casing dogs and goes from there.

Mayday in Northside has beefed up its hot dog menu lately (if that’s the right terminology for a place that includes a vegan dog) with all kinds of toppings, including a house apricot ketchup.

There are two food trucks, Mr. Hanton’s and Gene’s, that specialize in topped dogs (though their toppings are fairly traditional).

Even Great American Ball Park has added fancy dogs at the Machine Room, including one based on a Vietnamese banh mi.

So, for your summer grill-outs, take a tip from those eateries. Keep the grilling simple, but get elaborate with the toppings. You can put out a random selection and let your friends create their own hot dog – and own names.

To get your imagination started, we asked restaurant owners to share with us a their favorite dog topping recipes. They are loosely re-created in our photos.

Note: lot of local restaurants use the all-beef dogs made right downtown at Avril-Bleh & Sons on Court Street. They also make an all-pork and a natural casing wiener.

 

Read the entire article by clicking the link below:

 

http://communitypress.cincinnati.com/article/AB/20120704/LIFE01/307040018/American-hot-dog-revolution?odyssey=nav%7Chead

Hot Dog Roller and Toaster

March 23, 2012 at 1:13 PM | Posted in Food, grilling, Hot Dogs | 2 Comments
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Well I broke down and purchased a Hot Dog Roller and Toaster! Another one of those “Set it and forget it” kitchen gadgets, which I love. I tried it out for lunch and it works great! It has a timer you set depending on how done you want your dogs and a bun warmer to heat those buns up! I left the product description below, I purchased through Amazon.

Hot Dog Roller and Toaster
by HLA

Cook grilled-to-perfection ball park quality hot dogs at home – complete with a golden toasted bun! Ever wonder why hot dogs always taste the best at ball games, carnivals and fairs? It’s the way they’re cooked! Bite into a hot dog prepared with this quality hot dog oven and toaster and you’ll be in hot dog heaven. The stainless steel motorized rollers grill hot dogs evenly all the way around for absolute perfection. Pop the buns in the toaster oven below and they’re warm and toasted for that one-of-a-kind taste. Great for heating other breads & snacks too. Features 210 total watts of power, auto thermostat, timer, aluminum tray to cook veggies and more, aluminum grease tray that removes for easy cleaning, see through oven door and compact design that’s just 12-1/2 x 7 x 7-1/2.

 

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