Fall Harvest: Figs

October 1, 2013 at 8:00 AM | Posted in fruits | 1 Comment
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Figs have a short second season in late fall (the first harvest comes in summer) just in time for Thanksgiving.

 

Fresh figs cut open showing the flesh and seeds inside

Fresh figs cut open showing the flesh and seeds inside

The common fig (Ficus carica) is a species of  flowering plant in the genus Ficus, from the family Moraceae, known as the common fig (or just the fig), anjeer (Iran, Pakistan), and dumur (Bengali). It is the source of the fruit also called the fig, and as such is an important crop in those areas where it is grown commercially. Native to the Middle East and western Asia, it has been sought out and cultivated by man since ancient times, and is now widely grown throughout the temperate world, both for its fruit and as an ornamental plant.

 

 

Figs can be eaten fresh or dried, and used in jam-making. Most commercial production is in dried or otherwise processed forms, since the ripe fruit does not transport well, and once picked does not keep well. The widely produced fig newton or fig roll is a biscuit (cookie) with a filling made from figs.

 

 

Figs are among the richest plant sources of calcium and fiber. According to USDA data for the Mission variety, dried figs are richest in fiber, copper, manganese, magnesium, potassium, calcium, and vitamin K, relative to human needs. They have smaller amounts of many other nutrients. Figs have a laxative effect and contain many antioxidants. They are a good source of flavonoids and polyphenols including gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, syringic acid, (+)-catechin, (−)-epicatechin and rutin. In one study, a 40-gram portion of dried figs (two medium size figs) produced a significant increase in plasma antioxidant capacity.

 

 

 

Fall Harvest: Cranberries

September 30, 2013 at 9:10 AM | Posted in fruits | 2 Comments
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Cranberries, native to North America, and are harvested in New England and the Upper Midwest in the fall.

 

 

Cranberry bush with fruit partially submerged

Cranberry bush with fruit partially submerged

Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs or trailing vines in the subgenus Oxycoccus of the genus Vaccinium. In some methods of classification, Oxycoccus is regarded as a genus in its own right. They can be found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the northern hemisphere.
Cranberries are low, creeping shrubs or vines up to 2 metres (7 ft) long and 5 to 20 centimetres (2 to 8 in) in height; they have slender, wiry stems that are not thickly woody and have small evergreen leaves. The flowers are dark pink, with very distinct reflexed petals, leaving the style and stamens fully exposed and pointing forward. They are pollinated by bees. The fruit is a berry that is larger than the leaves of the plant; it is initially white, but turns a deep red when fully ripe. It is edible, with an acidic taste that can overwhelm its sweetness.
Cranberries are a major commercial crop in certain American states and Canadian provinces (see cultivation and uses below). Most cranberries are processed into products such as juice, sauce, jam, and sweetened dried cranberries, with the remainder sold fresh to consumers. Cranberry sauce is regarded as an indispensable part of traditional American and Canadian Thanksgiving menus and some European winter festivals.
Since the early 21st century within the global functional food industry, raw cranberries have been marketed as a “superfruit” due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities.

 

 

There are three to four species of cranberry, classified in two sections:
Subgenus Oxycoccus, sect. Oxycoccus
8 Vaccinium oxycoccos or Oxycoccus palustris (Common Cranberry or Northern Cranberry) is widespread throughout the cool temperate northern hemisphere, including northern Europe, northern Asia and northern North America. It has small 5–10 mm leaves. The flowers are dark pink, with a purple central spike, produced on finely hairy stems. The fruit is a small pale pink berry, with a refreshing sharp acidic flavour.
* Vaccinium microcarpum or Oxycoccus microcarpus (Small Cranberry) occurs in northern North America,[6] northern Europe and northern Asia, and differs from V. oxycoccos in the leaves being more triangular, and the flower stems hairless. Some botanists include it within V. oxycoccos.
* Vaccinium macrocarpon or Oxycoccus macrocarpus (Large cranberry, American Cranberry, Bearberry) native to northern North America across Canada, and eastern United States, south to North Carolina at high altitudes). It differs from V. oxycoccos in the leaves being larger, 10–20 mm long, and in its slightly apple-like taste.
Subgenus Oxycoccus, sect. Oxycoccoides
* Vaccinium erythrocarpum or Oxycoccus erythrocarpus (Southern Mountain Cranberry) native to southeastern North America at high altitudes in the southern Appalachian Mountains, and also in eastern Asia.

 

Cranberries

Cranberries

Cranberries are related to bilberries, blueberries, and huckleberries, all in Vaccinium subgenus Vaccinium. These differ in having stouter, woodier stems forming taller shrubs, and in the bell-shaped flowers, the petals not being reflexed.
Some plants of the completely unrelated genus Viburnum are sometimes inaccurately called “highbush cranberries” (Viburnum trilobum).
Cranberries are susceptible to false blossom, a harmful but controllable phytoplasma disease common in the eastern production areas of Massachusetts and New Jersey.

 

 

Cranberries are a major commercial crop in the U.S. states of Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin, as well as in the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, New Brunswick, Ontario, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Quebec. 20% of the world’s cranberries are produced in British Columbia’s lower mainland region. In the United States, Wisconsin is the leading producer of cranberries, with over half of U.S. production. Massachusetts is the second largest U.S. producer. A very small production is found in southern Argentina and Chile, the Netherlands, and Eastern Europe.[citation needed]
Historically, cranberry beds were constructed in wetlands. Today cranberry beds are constructed in upland areas with a shallow water table. The topsoil is scraped off to form dykes around the bed perimeter. Clean sand is hauled into a depth of four to eight inches. The surface is laser leveled flat to provide even drainage. Beds are frequently drained with socked tile in addition to the perimeter ditch. In addition to making it possible to hold water, the dykes allow equipment to service the beds without driving on the vines. Irrigation equipment is installed in the bed to provide irrigation for vine growth and for spring and autumn frost protection.

 

 

Cranberry vines are propagated by moving vines from an established bed. The vines are spread on the surface of the sand of the new bed and pushed into the sand with a blunt disk. The vines are watered frequently during the first few weeks until roots form and new shoots grow. Beds are given frequent light application of nitrogen fertilizer during the first year. The cost of establishment for new cranberry beds is estimated to be about US$70,000 per hectare (approx. $28,300 per acre).
A common misconception about cranberry production is that the beds remain flooded throughout the year. During the growing season cranberry beds are not flooded, but are irrigated regularly to maintain soil moisture. Beds are flooded in the autumn to facilitate harvest and again during the winter to protect against low temperatures. In cold climates like Wisconsin, Maine, and eastern Canada, the winter flood typically freezes into ice, while in warmer climates the water remains liquid. When ice forms on the beds, trucks can be driven onto the ice to spread a thin layer of sand that helps to control pests and rejuvenate the vines. Sanding is done every three to five years.

 

 

Cranberry harvest in New Jersey

Cranberry harvest in New Jersey

Cranberries are harvested in the fall when the fruit takes on its distinctive deep red color. This is usually in September through the first part of November. To harvest cranberries, the beds are flooded with six to eight inches of water above the vines. A harvester is driven through the beds to remove the fruit from the vines. For the past 50 years, water reel type harvesters have been used. Harvested cranberries float in the water and can be corralled into a corner of the bed and conveyed or pumped from the bed. From the farm, cranberries are taken to receiving stations where they are cleaned, sorted, and stored prior to packaging or processing.
Although most cranberries are wet-picked as described above, 5–10% of the US crop is still dry-picked. This entails higher labor costs and lower yield, but dry-picked berries are less bruised and can be sold as fresh fruit instead of having to be immediately frozen or processed. Originally performed with two-handed comb scoops, dry picking is today accomplished by motorized, walk-behind harvesters which must be small enough to traverse beds without damaging the vines.
White cranberry juice is made from regular cranberries that have been harvested after the fruits are mature, but before they have attained their characteristic dark red color. Yields are lower on beds harvested early and the early flooding tends to damage vines, but not severely.
Cranberries for fresh market are stored in shallow bins or boxes with perforated or slatted bottoms, which deter decay by allowing air to circulate. Because harvest occurs in late autumn, cranberries for fresh market are frequently stored in thick walled barns without mechanical refrigeration. Temperatures are regulated by opening and closing vents in the barn as needed. Cranberries destined for processing are usually frozen in bulk containers shortly after arriving at a receiving station.

 

 

About 95% of cranberries are processed into products such as juice drinks, sauce, and sweetened dried cranberries. The remaining are sold fresh to consumers.
Cranberries are normally considered too sharp to be eaten plain and raw, as they are not only sour but bitter as well.
Cranberry juice is a major use of cranberries; it is usually either sweetened to make “cranberry juice cocktail” or blended with other fruit juices to reduce its natural severe tartness. Many cocktails, including the Cosmopolitan, are made with cranberry juice. At one teaspoon of sugar per ounce, cranberry juice cocktail is more highly sweetened than even soda drinks that have been linked to obesity.
Usually cranberries as fruit are cooked into a compote or jelly, known as cranberry sauce. Such preparations are traditionally served with roast turkey, as a staple of English Christmas dinners, and the Canadian and US holiday Thanksgiving. The berry is also used in baking (muffins, scones, cakes and breads). In baking it is often combined with orange or orange zest. Less commonly, innovative cooks use cranberries to add tartness to savory dishes such as soups and stews.
Fresh cranberries can be frozen at home, and will keep up to nine months; they can be used directly in recipes without thawing.
Cranberry wine is made in some of the cranberry-growing regions of the United States and Canada from either whole cranberries, cranberry juice or cranberry juice concentrate.

 

2013 U.S. apple crop is up 13 percent

September 22, 2013 at 8:29 AM | Posted in fruits | Leave a comment
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The estimate was given during the association’s annual Apple Crop Outlook and Marketing Conference, held Aug. 22-23 in Chicago.

The 2013 estimate represents a 13 percent increase over 2012’s final crop of 215 million bushels, and a 9 percent increase over the five-year average (224 million bushels). It’s the largest crop since 2004, according to USDA statistics.

This was the first year the association prepared its estimate without the benefit of a parallel USDA survey, which was suspended due to budget constraints.

“This was a challenging task in light of the USDA not conducting its work this year,” said Mark Seetin, USApple’s director of regulatory and industry affairs.

“The national crop is up from last year, on the whole and countrywide, but I don’t think it’s a burdensome crop at all,” said Phil Glaize owner of Glaize Orchards in Winchester, Va. “It’s only the 13th largest crop this country has ever produced.”

East

In the Eastern states, the 2013 estimate is 58 million bushels, 39 percent greater than the 2012 crop and 6 percent greater than the five-year average.

“The big news is New York and North Carolina have come back with their production this year,” Glaize said.

New York is expected to be up 87 percent, with a total crop of 32,000 bushels. North Carolina should increase 339 percent, to 3,500 bushels.

“The production from North Carolina to New England is skewed a little bit more toward fresh this year,” Glaize said. “Any holes in the crops are basically in the processing plants.

“This year, there are no major quality issues do to weather,” Glaize said. “Sizing is good throughout the region. With an abnormal amount of rain, you might have thought apples are extra large, but I don’t really think we have that. There is a spread of sizes, not too many small ones, with mostly medium-size to medium-large apples.”

Midwest

The Midwest estimate is 35 million bushels, 472 percent greater than 2012 and 61 percent above the five-year average.

“My favorite number is the 996 percent increase in Michigan over last year,” said Mike Rothwell, president of BelleHarvest Sales in Belding, Mich.

“Michigan’s 16 million bushels for a five-year average has been influenced by crop failures in 2008, 2010 and 2012,” Rothwell said. “With the crop fluctuations we’ve had, we no longer have normals, just averages.”

Rothwell said marketers began pushing the 2013 crop earlier this year, looking for new markets with deeper penetration and increased exports.

Production and infrastructure improvements, combined with more cooperative weather, are leading to the crop’s recovery.

“The new state bird for the state of Michigan is going to be the frost fan,” he said. “Hopefully, these fluctuations from size will begin to level off. It almost has to.”

West

In the Western states, the 2013 estimate is 149 million bushels, down 11 percent from 2012 but 1 percent greater than the five-year average.

Washington state will be down 10 percent, to 140 million bushels. This follows a record crop of 154 million bushels in 2012.

“Washington has had some heat with some sunburn,” said Dan Kelly, assistant manager of Washington Growers Clearinghouse. “We’ve also had some hail. After a lengthy discussion about fresh and processing, we’ve come up with 140 million. That will be the second-largest apple crop on record.”

Kelly said Idaho has had issues with tight labor, early frost and a lot of heat. That state’s production was adjusted down to 1 million bushels, a 44 percent decrease from last year and 35 percent below the five-year average.

California’s 2013 estimate of 4.8 million bushels is 33 percent less than 2012’s crop, and 32 percent below the 5-year average.

“They are heavily into their harvest, having gone through a lot of Galas already,” Kelly said. “They’ve had 14 days of 100 degrees or higher heat, and they’re also 14 days early.”

– Gary Pullano

 

 

http://fruitgrowersnews.com/index.php/magazine/article/united-fresh-a-fresh-cut-for-the-future

Fall Harvest: Apples

September 22, 2013 at 8:27 AM | Posted in fruits | 1 Comment
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A typical apple

A typical apple

 

Apples are one of those fruits people have forgotten have a season. But they do, and in the Northern Hemisphere they’re harvested late summer through fall.

 

 
The apple is the pomaceous fruit of the apple tree, species Malus domestica in the rose family (Rosaceae). It is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits, and the most widely known of the many members of genus Malus that are used by humans. Apples grow on small, deciduous trees. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe, and were brought to North America by European colonists. Apples have been present in the mythology and religions of many cultures, including Norse, Greek and Christian traditions. In 2010, the fruit’s genome was decoded, leading to new understandings of disease control and selective breeding in apple production.
There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples, resulting in a range of desired characteristics. Different cultivars are bred for various tastes and uses, including cooking, fresh eating and cider production. Domestic apples are generally propagated by grafting, although wild apples grow readily from seed. Trees are prone to a number of fungal, bacterial and pest problems, which can be controlled by a number of organic and non-organic means.
About 69 million tonnes of apples were grown worldwide in 2010, and China produced almost half of this total. The United States is the second-leading producer, with more than 6% of world production. Turkey is third, followed by Italy, India and Poland. Apples are often eaten raw, but can also be found in many prepared foods (especially desserts) and drinks. Many beneficial health effects are thought to result from eating apples; however, two forms of allergies are seen to various proteins found in the fruit.

 

 

Apples are often eaten raw. The whole fruit including the skin is suitable for human consumption except for the seeds, which may affect some consumers. The core is often not eaten and is discarded. Varieties bred for raw consumption are termed dessert or table apples.
Apples can be canned or juiced. They are milled or pressed to produce apple juice, which may be drunk unfiltered (called apple cider in North America), or filtered. The juice can be fermented to make cider (called hard cider in North America), ciderkin, and vinegar. Through distillation, various alcoholic beverages can be produced, such as applejack, Calvados, and apfelwein. Apple seed oil and pectin may also be produced.

 

 

Different kinds of apple cultivars in a supermarket

Different kinds of apple cultivars in a supermarket

Apples are an important ingredient in many desserts, such as apple pie, apple crumble, apple crisp and apple cake. They are often eaten baked or stewed, and they can also be dried and eaten or reconstituted (soaked in water, alcohol or some other liquid) for later use. Puréed apples are generally known as apple sauce. Apples are also made into apple butter and apple jelly. They are also used (cooked) in meat dishes.
In the UK, a toffee apple is a traditional confection made by coating an apple in hot toffee and allowing it to cool. Similar treats in the US are candy apples (coated in a hard shell of crystallized sugar syrup), and caramel apples, coated with cooled caramel.
Apples are eaten with honey at the Jewish New Year of Rosh Hashanah to symbolize a sweet new year.
Farms with apple orchards may open them to the public, so consumers may themselves pick the apples they will purchase.
Sliced apples turn brown with exposure to air due to the conversion of natural phenolic substances into melanin upon exposure to oxygen. Different cultivars vary in their propensity to brown after slicing. Sliced fruit can be treated with acidulated water to prevent this effect.

 

 

The proverb “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”, addressing the health effects of the fruit, dates from 19th century Wales. Preliminary research suggests that apples may reduce the risk of colon cancer, prostate cancer and lung cancer. Apple peels contain ursolic acid which, in rat studies, increases skeletal muscle and brown fat, and decreases white fat, obesity, glucose intolerance, and fatty liver disease. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, a typical apple serving weighs 242 grams and contains 126 calories with significant dietary fiber and vitamin C content.
Apple peels are a source of various phytochemicals with unknown nutritional value and possible antioxidant activity in vitro. The predominant phenolic phytochemicals in apples are quercetin, epicatechin, and procyanidin B2.
Apple juice concentrate has been found in mice to increase the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Other studies have shown an “alleviation of oxidative damage and cognitive decline” in mice after the administration of apple juice. Fruit flies fed an apple extract lived 10% longer than other flies fed a normal diet.

 

 

 

13 Fruits and Vegetables to Buy in Fall

September 20, 2013 at 8:30 AM | Posted in fruits, vegetables | Leave a comment
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From Reader’s Digest a guide to fruits and vegetables that are at their peaks in fall. I left the link at the bottom of the post.

 
13 Fruits and Vegetables to Buy in Fall
Just because summer is over, doesn’t mean you can’t buy fresh produce. Here are 13 fruits and vegetables that are at their peaks in fall.
1. Apples
Visit your local farmers’ market or take a trip to the apple farm for the freshest apples. They’re perfect for snacking, baking, and more…
2. Oranges
From Florida to California, autumn is the best time to enjoy this citrus favorite….
3. Grapes
Fall’s harvest brings in a bounty of grapes in all varieties. Either as a snack or made into your favorite jam, now is the perfect time to bag a bunch….
*Click the link below to see the entire list along with recipes.

 
http://www.rd.com/slideshows/13-fruits-and-vegetables-to-buy-in-fall/#slideshow=slide1

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 20, 2013 at 8:28 AM | Posted in fruits, Kitchen Hints, vegetables | Leave a comment
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If you have kids who don’t like vegetables, you’ll love this clever way to get more nutrients into them. If you have too many fruits and vegetables to use before they go bad, puree them in a blender with a little bit of lemon juice, then freeze. Defrost and add to sauces, soups, stews, enchiladas, and more – your kid won’t be able to taste the difference! The key is making sure you don’t dramatically alter the color of the dish you’re serving. So if you’re making a white sauce, for instance, try a puree of cauliflower and summer squash. Tomato based sauces can usually handle one part “green puree” for every four parts tomato sauce. Pureed fruit works great in muffin recipes or mixed ice cream. So grind up that broccoli and spinach and get going!

33 Delicious Fall Apple Recipes

September 19, 2013 at 7:27 AM | Posted in baking, Eating Well, fruits | Leave a comment
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It’s inching closer to my favorite time of the year, the Fall Season! To celebrate the upcoming Fall here some delicious Apple inspired recipes. All from the Eating Well web site.

 

Eating Well

 

33 Delicious Fall Apple Recipes
An apple a day keeps the doctor away, they say. That’s because apples are a nutrition powerhouse, complete with fiber and immune-boosting vitamin C. Better yet, apples are perfect baked into yummy pies and cobblers or simmered into luscious soups and chutneys. For your health and your taste buds, these award-winning apple recipes, such as Mom’s Apple Squares and Deep-Dish Apple Pie, are must-tries!

 
Dozens of sweet and savory ways to enjoy apples.
Apple recipes are a favorite fall fruit, whether you enjoy them in apple pie, apple crisp, applesauce or pork recipes that incorporate apples. No matter whether you like your apples sweet and fruity or tart and biting, you can feel good about eating these healthy apple recipes. Apples are a good source of soluble fiber, potassium and folate. So go ahead and enjoy them in good health.

 
Deep-Dish Apple Pie
With all that delicious fruit an apple pie should be healthy, but the truth is a slice can have as much as 750 calories and 30 grams of fat. For the most part, the culprit is the crust. We use whole-wheat pastry flour to add fiber and lower the saturated fat by replacing some of the butter with canola oil. The brown sugar-sweetened filling in this pie is made with two kinds of apples for the perfect balance. A slice has half the calories of a typical version and only 10 grams of fat—sweet!….

 
Spiced Chicken Breasts with Apple-Jalapeno Chutney
A bit of jalapeno jelly adds a touch of heat and color to the sweet-and-sour apple chutney. It makes the perfect accompaniment to this and other spicy chicken and pork dishes, particularly those cooked over the grill…..

 

* Get all these Apple inspired recipes and ideas by clicking the link below

 
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_apple_recipes?sssdmh=dm17.691694&utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw091013

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 19, 2013 at 6:24 AM | Posted in fruits, Kitchen Hints, vegetables | Leave a comment
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Store fruits and vegetables in separate drawers in your fridge. Even when chilled, fruits give off ethylene gas that shortens the shelf life of other fruit and vegetables by causing them to ripen more quickly.

Sharp Cheddar Buffalo Burger w/ Baked Fries

September 9, 2013 at 5:12 PM | Posted in fruits, Ore - Ida, Sargento's Cheese, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Sharp Cheddar Buffalo Burger w/ Baked FriesSharp Cheddar Buffalo Burger Fries 004

 

 

 

The last couple of days I’ve been a little nervous as I found a small knot, or lump, on my right arm in the armpit. And with my history of Melanoma it’s always a bit unnerving when something like this pops up. So my Oncologist got me right in this afternoon to check everything out. The news was good! The knot I was feeling is a result of the Cancer Clinical Trial I took a few years back. The knot was near where and injection site was when I received treatment for the trial. As they say better safe than sorry.

 

 

For dinner I prepared a Sharp Cheddar Buffalo Burger w/ Baked Fries. I used the Wild Idea Buffalo 1/4 Lb. Buffalo Burger, my favorite which Wil;d Idea Buffalo was featured on the Food Network last night! The Burgers come frozen in a package 4 and pre-made. So just thaw and fry it! I seasoned it with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper. I pan fried it in Canola Oil about 3 1/2 minutes per side. i served it on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Hamburger Bun and topped the Burger with a slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Sharp Cheddar.

 

 

To go with my Buffalo Burger I baked some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries. I had a side of Hidden Valley Smoked Bacon Ranch Spread/Dip for my Fries. I really like these new dips that Hidden Vally has out. Then for dessert later a Del Monte Diced Mano in Light Syrup.

 

 

 

 

Hidden Valley™ Smoked Bacon Ranch Sandwich Spread & DipHidden Valley Baco ranch
Transform your sandwich from ordinary to craveable with Hidden Valley™ Sandwich Spread & Dip in Smoked Bacon Ranch.
Sandwich Spreads & Condiments
Surprise your sandwich lovers. The delicious taste of Hidden Valley® isn’t just for salads anymore. Now you can create craveable sandwiches with new Hidden Valley™ Sandwich Spreads & Dips. The mouthwatering possibilities are practically endless, so grab your favorite sandwich fixings and start spreading the yum.

 
http://www.hiddenvalley.com/products/sandwich-spreads-and-condiments/?gclid=CJ3pkKSurbkCFcE7OgodqBcAkQ

 

 

 

 

Del monte Diced Mangos in Light SyrupDel Monte Diced Mangos
These rich and luscious mangos are a healthy way to add a little sweetness to your day – fat-free, cholesterol free, and high in Vitamin C – that you can enjoy anywhere.
Sizes Available:
4 oz
INGREDIENTS: MANGO, WATER, SUGAR, NATURAL FLAVOR, ASCORBIC ACID (TO PRESERVE COLOR), CALCIUM CHLORIDE, CITRIC ACID.
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 4oz (113g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 70 Calories from Fat 0
% Daily Value *
Potassium: 105mg 3%
Total Carbohydrates: 18g 6%
Fiber: 1g 4%
Sugars: 17g %
Protein: 0g %
Vitamin A: 4%
Vitamin C: 100%

 
http://www.delmonte.com/Products/detail.aspx?id=510&c=215.220.222.222.274

 

Eating Whole Fruits Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

September 2, 2013 at 8:56 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, fruits | Leave a comment
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Eating Whole Fruits Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

 

 

When it comes to lowering your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, eating whole fruit — and not the juice form — could do you some good, according to a new study.

Researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health found an association between eating at least two servings of fruit a week and having a 23 percent lower risk of diabetes, compared with eating less than a serving of fruit a month. Blueberries, grapes and apples seemed to be especially linked with the reduced diabetes risk.

Meanwhile, people who drank one serving or more of juice a day had up to a 21 percent higher risk of diabetes.

“Our data further endorse current recommendations on increasing whole fruits, but not fruit juice, as a measure for diabetes prevention,” study researcher Isao Muraki, a research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard, said in a statement. “And our novel findings may help refine this recommendation to facilitate diabetes prevention.”…..

 

 

 

* Read the entire article by clicking the link below. *

 

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/30/fruit-diabetes-juice-type-2-risk_n_3839169.html?utm_hp_ref=@food123

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