Apple of the Week – Golden Delicious

August 13, 2015 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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Golden Delicious

Golden Delicious

The Golden Delicious is a cultivar of apple with a yellow color, not closely related to the Red Delicious apple. According to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States.

 
Golden Delicious is a large, yellowish-green skinned cultivar and very sweet to the taste. It is prone to bruising and shriveling, so it needs careful handling and storage. It is a favorite for salads, apple sauce, and apple butter. The amount of acid in this apple increases, creating a sweeter flavor. In warmer growing areas, acid content is lower, creating a milder flavor.

 

Golden Delicious apples.

Golden Delicious apples.

This cultivar is a chance seedling possibly a hybrid of Grimes Golden and Golden Reinette. The original tree was found on the Mullins’ family farm in Clay County, West Virginia, United States and was locally known as Mullin’s Yellow Seedling and Annit apple. Anderson Mullins sold the tree and propagation rights to Stark Brothers Nurseries, which first marketed it as a companion of their Red Delicious in 1914.

 

 

The Golden Delicious was designated the official state fruit of West Virginia by a Senate resolution on February 20, 1995. Clay County has hosted an annual Golden Delicious Festival since 1972.

 

Harvested from autumn through winter.

West Virginia is the originator of many vegetable and fruit crops, including the apples Grimes Golden, and the Guyandotte, which is believed extinct.

 

Low in calories Golden Delicious apples are a good source of soluble fiber, which has been proven to help lower cholesterol, control weight and regulate blood sugar. They also contain vitamins A and C, as well as a trace amount of boron and potassium, most of which is located in the apples skin.

 

Apple of the Week – Fuji Apple

August 6, 2015 at 4:56 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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"Fuji" on a tree

“Fuji” on a tree

The Fuji apple is an apple hybrid developed by growers at the Tohoku Research Station and brought to market in 1962. It originated as a cross between two American apple varieties—the Red Delicious and old Virginia Ralls Genet (sometimes cited as “Rawls Jennet”) apples. According to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States.

It is named for the town of Fujisaki (the location of Tohoku Research Station).

 

 

Fuji apples are typically round and range from large to very large, averaging 75 mm in diameter. They contain between 9–11% sugars by weight and have a dense flesh that is sweeter and crisper than many other apple cultivars, making them popular with consumers around the world. Fuji apples also have a very long shelf life compared to other apples, even without refrigeration. With refrigeration, Fuji apples can remain fresh for up to a year.

In Japan, Fuji apples continue to be an unrivaled best-seller. Japanese consumers prefer the crispy texture and sweetness of Fuji apples (which is somewhat reminiscent of the coveted Nashi pear) almost to the exclusion of other varieties and Japan’s apple imports remain low. Aomori Prefecture, home to the Fuji apple, is the best known apple growing region of Japan. Of the roughly 900,000 tons of Japanese apples produced annually, 500,000 tons come from Aomori.

Outside of Japan the popularity of Fuji apples continues to grow. Fuji apples now account for 80% of China’s 20 million tons grown annually. Since their introduction into the U.S. market in the 1980s, Fuji apples have gained popularity with American consumers—as of 2003, Fuji apples ranked number 4 on the US Apple Association’s list of most popular apples, only trailing Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, and Gala. Fuji apples are grown in traditional apple-growing states such as Washington, Michigan, New York, and California. Washington State, where more than half of America’s apple crop is grown, produces about 135,000 tons of Fuji apples each year, third in volume behind Red Delicious and Golden Delicious varieties.

 

Apple of the Week – Envy Apples

July 30, 2015 at 5:16 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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ENVY APPLES

This week’s Apple of the Week happens to be my favorite new Apple, the Envy Apple. I love Honey Crisp Apples. I feel like I personally eat at 1 orchard by myself during it’s growing season! But the growing season for Honey Crisps is over so now I’m always searching for a fill-in Apple until the Honey Crisps come back into season. I usually go with a Gala Apple but I like a crisp and sweet Apple, Galas aren’t quite as hard and crisp as I like.

 
Well at Meijer last week I was checking to see if maybe they had some Honey Crisp Apples left, which they didn’t. So a man was stocking some items in produce and I asked him if they had a Hard, Crisp, and Sweet Apple and he told me of an Apple they had just got in a few days ago. It was the Envy Apple from New Zealand. So he grabbed one and sliced it up for me and I have a replacement for the Honey Crisp! I love these Apples. It’s like I like them; hard, crisp, and sweet. It’s one delicious Apple. Meijer is the only store I’ve seen them in so if you’re in Meijer and looking for a good Apple give it a try!

 
Envy Apples

Envy is a trademarked brand of the Scilate apple variety. Scilate is the result of a cross between Royal Gala and Braeburn. It was developed in New Zealand by HortResearch, submitted for a patent in 2008 and patented in 2009.

The Envy apple began getting distributed in North America through the Oppenheimer Group in 2009, and ENZA began small commercial volumes in 2012 in Washington State. In Washington, the fruit surpassed 100,000 cartons for production in 2014. The companies anticipate harvesting 2 million cartons of the fruit by 2020.

Envy apples are being grown under license in New Zealand, Washington (U.S. state) and Chile. Field tests are also being done in the UK, France, and with organic cultivation in Italy

Apple of the Week – Arkansas Black

July 23, 2015 at 5:05 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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The Arkansas Black is an apple cultivar, thought to have been developed in the mid-19th Century in Arkansas.

Arkansas Black apples

Arkansas Black apples

Arkansas Black apples are generally medium-sized with a somewhat flattened shape. Generally a very dark red on the tree, occasionally with a slight green blush where hidden from the sun, the apples grow darker as they ripen, becoming a very dark red or burgundy color. With storage the skin continues to darken. Arkansas Black is one of the darkest of all apple cultivars, hence the name.

The flesh in good years is notably hard and crunchy when fresh, though it does soften somewhat with keeping. Fairly tart when fresh-picked, the apples mellow with storage. Arkansas Blacks are considered an excellent keeping apple, and can be stored for six months in appropriate conditions.

Though the cultivar is grown throughout the United States, it is said that the best apples come from western Arkansas where the cultivar originated. Popular as a fresh picked apple at roadside stands and produce markets, the apple has begun to enter commercial distribution and so is now becoming more widely available.

 

Apple of the Week – Bramley

July 16, 2015 at 5:05 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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Bramley Apples

Bramley Apples

Malus domestica ‘Bramley’s Seedling’ (commonly known as the Bramley apple, or simply Bramley, Bramleys or Bramley’s) is a cultivar of apple which is usually eaten cooked due to its sourness. The Concise Household Encyclopedia states, “Some people eat this apple raw in order to cleanse the palate, but Bramley’s seedling is essentially the fruit for tart, pie, or dumpling.” Once cooked, however, it has a lighter flavour. A peculiarity of the variety is that when cooked it becomes golden and fluffy.

 

 

‘Bramley’s Seedling’ apple trees are large, vigorous, spreading and long-lived. They tolerate some shade. The apples are very large, two or three times the weight of a typical dessert apple such as a Granny Smith. They are flat with a vivid green skin which becomes red on the side which receives direct sunlight. The tree is resistant to apple scab and mildew and does best when grown as a standard in somewhat heavy clay soil. It is a heavy and regular bearer, and as a triploid, it has sterile pollen. It needs a pollenizer but cannot pollenize in return, so it is normally grown with two other varieties of apple for pollination. It has won many awards and currently holds the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit (H4).

Most of the stock of ‘Bramley’s Seedling’ commercially available is slightly different in its growth habit and other characteristics from the original tree, probably because of a chance mutation (or mutations) that occurred unnoticed over the years. Plants produced from the still-surviving (then 180-year-old) tree by tissue culture in 1990 have proved to be much more compact and free-branching than the widely available commercial stock. The cloning work was done by scientists at the University of Nottingham, because the original tree was suffering from old age and was under attack by honey fungus. Twelve of the cloned trees now grow in the University grounds; one was also planted beside the old tree at Southwell.

 

 

Bramley apples work well in pies, cooked fruit compotes and salads, crumbles, and other dessert dishes. They are also used in a variety of chutney recipes, as well as in cider making. Whole Bramley apples, cored and filled with dried fruit, baked, and then served with custard is an inexpensive and traditional British pudding. Cooked apple sauce is the traditional accompaniment to roast pork. Hot apple sauce goes very well with ice cream.

Regardless of the dish, Bramley apples are generally cooked in the same basic way. First the fruit is peeled and then sliced, and the pieces covered in lemon juice (or some other acidic juice) to stop them turning brown. Sugar is usually added. In pies and crumbles, the fruit is simply covered with the topping and baked; the moisture in the apples is sufficient to soften them while cooking. The flavor may be spiced, according to taste, with cloves or cinnamon. To make apple sauce, the apples are sliced and then stewed with sugar and lemon juice in a saucepan.

‘Bramley’s Seedling’ apples are favored for producing a jelly which is very pale in color. Because the tree is a heavy cropper and liable to glut, it is a fine candidate for the domestic production of fruit wine, alone or with other fruits, and cider.

 

Apple of the Week

July 9, 2015 at 5:07 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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A typical apple

A typical apple

For quite awhile now on Thursdays it’s been Herb and Spice of the Week. We pretty much worked our way through the Spices and Herbs so starting this week it will be Apple Varieties.

 

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away”

 

Apple

The apple tree (Malus domestica) is a deciduous tree in the rose family best known for its sweet, pomaceous fruit, the apple. It is cultivated worldwide as a fruit tree, and is the most widely grown species in the genus Malus. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, is still found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe, and were brought to North America by European colonists. Apples have religious and mythological significance in many cultures, including Norse, Greek and European Christian traditions.

Apple trees are large if grown from seed, but small if grafted onto roots (rootstock). There are more than 7,500 known cultivars of apples, resulting in a range of desired characteristics. Different cultivars are bred for various tastes and uses, including cooking, eating raw and cider production. Apples are generally propagated by grafting, although wild apples grow readily from seed. Trees and fruit are prone to a number of fungal, bacterial and pest problems, which can be controlled by a number of organic and non-organic means. In 2010, the fruit’s genome was decoded as part of research on disease control and selective breeding in apple production.

About 80 million tons of apples were grown worldwide in 2013, and China produced almost half of this total. The United States is the second-leading producer, with more than 6% of world production. Turkey is third, followed by Italy, India and Poland. Apples are often eaten raw, but can also be found in many prepared foods (especially desserts) and drinks. Many beneficial health effects are thought to result from eating apples; however, two types of allergies are attributed to various proteins found in the fruit.

 

Different kinds of apple cultivars in a wholesale food market

Different kinds of apple cultivars in a wholesale food market

Commercially, apples can be stored for some months in controlled-atmosphere chambers to delay ethylene-induced ripening. Apples are commonly stored in chambers with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide and high air filtration. This prevents ethylene concentrations from rising to higher amounts and preventing ripening from occurring too quickly. Ripening continues when the fruit is removed from storage. For home storage, most varieties of apple can be held for approximately two weeks when kept at the coolest part of the refrigerator (i.e. below 5 °C). Some types, including the Granny Smith and Fuji, can be stored up to a year without significant degradation.

 

 

Apples are often eaten raw. The whole fruit including the skin is suitable for human consumption except for the seeds, which may affect some consumers. The core is often not eaten and is discarded. Varieties bred for raw consumption are termed dessert or table apples.

Apples can be canned or juiced. They are milled or pressed to produce apple juice, which may be drunk unfiltered (called apple cider in North America), or filtered. The juice can be fermented to make cider (called hard cider in North America), ciderkin, and vinegar. Through distillation, various alcoholic beverages can be produced, such as applejack, Calvados, and apfelwein. Apple seed oil and pectin may also be produced.

 

 

An apple's stem end, side, and interior

An apple’s stem end, side, and interior

Apples are an important ingredient in many desserts, such as apple pie, apple crumble, apple crisp and apple cake. They are often eaten baked or stewed, and they can also be dried and eaten or reconstituted (soaked in water, alcohol or some other liquid) for later use. When cooked, some apple varieties easily form a puree known as apple sauce. Apples are also made into apple butter and apple jelly. They are also used (cooked) in meat dishes.

In the UK, a toffee apple is a traditional confection made by coating an apple in hot toffee and allowing it to cool. Similar treats in the U.S. are candy apples (coated in a hard shell of crystallized sugar syrup), and caramel apples, coated with cooled caramel.
Apples are eaten with honey at the Jewish New Year of Rosh Hashanah to symbolize a sweet new year.
Farms with apple orchards may open them to the public, so consumers may themselves pick the apples they will purchase.
Sliced apples turn brown with exposure to air due to the conversion of natural phenolic substances into melanin upon exposure to oxygen. Different cultivars vary in their propensity to brown after slicing[70] and the genetically engineered Arctic Apples do not brown. Sliced fruit can be treated with acidulated water to prevent this effect.

 

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