One of America’s Favorites – Spare Ribs

August 2, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Basted spare ribs on an outdoor grill

Spare ribs (also side ribs or spareribs) are a variety of ribs cut from the lower portion of a pig, specifically the belly and breastbone, behind the shoulder, and include 11 to 13 long bones. There is a covering of meat on top of the bones and also between them. Spare ribs (pork) are distinguished from short ribs, which are beef.

Pork spare ribs are cooked and eaten in various cuisines around the world. They are especially popular in Chinese and American Chinese cuisine; they are generally called paigu, and in the cuisine of the Southern United States.

Southern American
Spare ribs are popular in the American South. They are generally cooked on a barbecue grill or on an open fire, and are served as a slab (bones and all) with a sauce. Due to the extended cooking times required for barbecuing, ribs in restaurants are often prepared first by boiling, parboiling or steaming the rib rack and then finishing it on the grill.

American butchers prepare two cuts:

Pork spare ribs are taken from the belly side of the pig’s rib cage above the sternum (breast bone) and below the back ribs which extend about 6″ down from the spine. Spare ribs are flatter than the curved back ribs and contain more bone than meat. There is also quite a bit of fat which can make the ribs more tender than baby back ribs.
St. Louis Cut ribs are spare ribs in the style of St. Louis-style barbecue, where the sternum bone, cartilage and the surrounding meat known as the rib tips have been removed. St. Louis Cut rib racks are almost rectangular.
Southern-style spare ribs are usually pulled from the whole slab and consumed individually by hand, with the small amount of meat adhering to each bone gnawed off by the eater.

Chinese Style Spare Ribs

Chinese
In Chinese cuisine, pork spare ribs are generally first cut into 7-to-10-centimetre (3 to 4 in) sections, then may be fried, steamed, or braised.

In the Cantonese cuisine of southern China, spare ribs are generally red in color and roasted with a sweet and savory sauce. This variety of spare ribs is grouped as one of the most common items of siu mei, or Cantonese roasted meat dishes. In American Chinese cuisine, pork spare ribs are generally cooked in char siu style, and often feature as a part of the appetizer dish called pu pu platter.

Chinese-style spare ribs are usually consumed by gnawing the meat off of the small bone sections while held aloft with chopsticks.

Leave a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Swirl and Spice

Appreciation for Food and Wine with Sophistication, Elegance & Finesse

Gluten-Free Finder

Find certified gluten-free restaurants and products

Chicks & Jam

Sticky Winging It Through Life.

Whole and Heavenly Oven

Where healthy meets indulgent

Callywood Farms

Nourish Your Body, Excite Your Taste Buds, and Give Back to the Earth

The Happy Viking

I'm not a Viking woman... but I like the sound of it.

Diabetes Meal Ideas

This I can eat

the muffin anne

Vegan, Mother, Cooker

Home of Malones

A lifestyle blog sharing her tales of motherhood and love for fashion, food, entertainment and travel.

Rochelle's Kitchen London

Simple home cooking for family and friends...

Dinner at the Franzens

Here's what is cooking at our house

Siiri's Blog

The Journey to Self Reliance

The Spinning Sheep

Exploration into Medieval, Early Modern, and Regency Clothing, Fiber Arts, Textiles, and Foodstuffs

%d bloggers like this: