One of America’s Favorites – Poached Egg

May 6, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

A poached egg in a Salad Niçoise

A poached egg is an egg that has been cooked, outside the shell, by poaching (or sometimes steaming), as opposed to simmering or boiling liquid.

This method of preparation is favored for eggs, as it can yield more delicately cooked eggs than cooking at higher temperatures such as with boiling water.

The egg is cracked into a cup or bowl of any size, and then gently slid into a pan of water at approximately 75 Celsius (167 °F) and cooked until the egg white has mostly solidified, but the yolk remains soft. The “perfect” poached egg has a runny yolk, with a hardening crust and no raw white remaining.

Broken into water at the poaching temperature, the white will cling to the yolk, resulting in cooked egg white and runny yolk.

Any given chicken egg contains some egg white that is prone to dispersing into the poaching liquid and cooking into an undesirable foam. To prevent this, the egg can be strained beforehand to remove the thinner component of the egg white. A small amount of vinegar may also be added to the water, as its acidic qualities accelerate the poaching process. Stirring the water vigorously to create a vortex may also reduce dispersion.

A single broken poached egg on 2 pieces of toast

The term “poaching” is used for this method but is actually incorrect. The egg is placed in a cup and suspended over simmering water, using a special pan called an “egg-poacher”. This is usually a wide-bottomed pan with an inner lid, with holes containing a number of circular cups that each hold one egg, with an additional lid over the top. To cook, the pan is filled with water and brought to a simmer, or a gentle boil. The outer lid holds in the steam, ensuring that the heat surrounds the egg completely. The cups are often lubricated with butter in order to effect easy removal of the cooked egg, although non-stick egg poachers are also available.

The result is very similar to the traditional coddled egg, although these steamed eggs are often cooked for longer, and hence are firmer. Eggs so prepared are often served on buttered toast.

Poached eggs are used in the traditional American breakfast/brunch dish Eggs Benedict.

Poached eggs are the basis for many dishes in Louisiana Creole cuisine, such as Eggs Sardou, Eggs Portuguese, Eggs Hussarde and Eggs St. Charles. Creole poached egg dishes are typically served for brunches.

Eggs Benedict, a dish often served for breakfast or brunch.

Several cuisines include eggs poached in soup or broth and served in the soup. In parts of central Colombia, for instance, a popular breakfast item is eggs poached in a scallion/coriander broth with milk, known as changua or simply caldo de huevo (“egg soup”).

The North African dish shakshouka consists of eggs poached in a spicy tomato sauce.

In Italy poached eggs are typically seasoned with grated parmigiano reggiano and butter (or olive oil).

In Korean cuisine, poached eggs are known as suran (수란) and is topped with variety of garnishes such as chili threads, rock tripe threads, and scallion threads.

Turkish dish çılbır consists of poached eggs, yogurt sauce with garlic and butter with red peppers.

In India, fried eggs are most commonly called “poached,” but are sometimes also known as bullseyes, as a reference to “bullseye” targets, or “half-boil” in Southern India, indicating that they are partly cooked. These eggs are “poached” in name only and so do not share the same preparation method as poached eggs in other countries.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Comment »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

the frozen biscuit

family style food, whole ingredients

Guam Christian Blog

Lifting up God’s people

Peace of Gluten Free Cake

Making living a gluten free life a "peace of gluten free cake"

Cook with Natty

Just trying to make life taste good

Eater's Digest

Understand what you feed your body

CRACK AN EGG!

Just another WordPress.com site

Never Not Hungry

A (mostly) food blog with delicious and doable recipes.

The Gastronomy Gal

Simplicity in food and travel

MAP 195 NETWORK BY OBAID KHAN!

map195@outlook.com & call me 00923219679935

Cooking with Kathy Man

Celebrating delicious and healthy food

Honey Homestead

My quest to grow 3 beehives into financial independence & the homestead that followed

SurreyKitchen

Living Life and Food

Eat the Vegan Rainbow

tips & tricks for plant-based home cooks

Shanice eats

Food, Music & Lifestyle journal

Tony's Fun Kitchen

Food Recipes, Good Times, Fun Conversation

Zest4Food

Savour the seasons with me on a virtual culinary journey and discover international cooking and baking recipes

vickidelbrouck

how to shop the sales and plan menus your kids will love

%d bloggers like this: