One of America’s Favorites – Deviled Egg

September 14, 2015 at 5:01 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate of deviled eggs

A plate of deviled eggs

Deviled eggs (US) or devilled eggs (UK) are hard-boiled eggs, shelled, cut in half, and filled with the hard-boiled egg’s yolk mixed with other ingredients such as mayonnaise and mustard, but many other variants exist internationally. Deviled eggs are usually served cold. They are served as a side dish, appetizer or a main course, and are a common holiday or party food.

 

 

The term “deviled”, in reference to food, was in use in the 18th century, with the first known print reference appearing in 1786. In the 19th century, it came to be used most often with spicy or zesty food, including eggs prepared with mustard, pepper or other ingredients stuffed in the yolk cavity.

In parts of the Southern and Midwestern United States, the terms “stuffed eggs”, “salad eggs”, “dressed eggs”, or “angel eggs” are also used, particularly when served in connection with church functions, avoiding the name “Devil.” The term “angel eggs” is also used in association with deviled eggs stuffed with “healthier” alternatives.

 

 

Cool hard-boiled eggs are peeled and halved lengthwise, and the yolks are removed. The yolks are then mashed and mixed with a variety of other ingredients, such as mayonnaise and mustard. Tartar sauce or Worcestershire sauce are also frequently used. Other common flavorings include: diced pickle or pickle relish, salt, ground black pepper, powdered cayenne pepper or chipotle chillies, turmeric, vinegar, green olives, pimentos, poppyseed, thyme, cilantro, minced onion, pickle brine, caviar, cream, capers, and sour cream. The yolk mixture is then scooped with a spoon and piped back into each egg “cup”. Old Bay, paprika, curry powder, cayenne, chives, and dill may then be sprinkled on top as a garnish. It may be further decorated with dollops of caviar, anchovy, bacon, shrimp or herring.

 

 

Contemporary versions of deviled eggs tend to include a wider range of seasonings and added foods, such as garlic, horseradish, wasabi, sliced jalapeños, cheese, chutney, capers, salsa, hot sauce, ham, mushrooms, spinach, sour cream, caviar, shrimp, smoked salmon or other seafood, and sardines.

 

Deviled egg plate

Deviled egg plate

The deviled egg can be seen in recipes as far back as ancient Rome, where they were traditionally served as a first course. It is still popular across the continent of Europe. In France it is called œuf mimosa; in Hungary, töltött tojás (“stuffed egg”) or kaszinótojás (“casino egg”); in Romania, ouă umplute (“stuffed eggs”); in the Netherlands gevuld ei (“stuffed egg”); in Sweden fyllda ägg (“stuffed eggs”); in Malta it is called bajd mimli (“stuffed eggs”). In many European countries, especially Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Germany, a variation is served known as “Russian eggs”. This consists of eggs cut in half, served with vegetable macédoine and garnished with mayonnaise, parsley and tomato. Contrary to what the name might suggest, the dish does not originate in Russia: its name derives from the fact that the eggs are served on a bed of macédoine, which is sometimes called Russian salad. In the Black Forest region of Germany, Russian eggs may be garnished with caviar. In Sweden, the deviled egg is a traditional dish on the Easter Smörgåsbord, where the yolk is mixed with caviar, cream or sour cream, optionally chopped red onion, and decorated with chopped chives or dill, perhaps with a piece of anchovy or pickled herring. Deviled eggs are a common dish in the United States. In the Midwestern and Southern U.S., they are commonly served as hors d’oeuvres before a full meal is served, often during the summer months. Deviled eggs are so popular in the United States that special carrying trays are sold for them. Prepared and packaged deviled eggs are now available in some U.S. supermarkets.

In French cuisine, the other ingredients are most likely to be pepper and parsley. In Hungarian cuisine the yolks are mashed and mixed with white bread soaked in milk, mustard and parsley, often served as an appetizer in mayonnaise or as a main course baked in the oven with Hungarian sour cream topping and served with French fries. Other common flavorings of the yolks in the German cuisine are anchovy, cheese and caper.

 

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