BBQ Marinated Pork Chop w/ Cut Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, and Wheat Bread

December 31, 2013 at 6:30 PM | Posted in Idahoan Potato Products, JB's Fatboy Sauces and Rub, pork chops | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: BBQ Marinated Pork Chop w/ Cut Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, and Wheat Bread

 

 

BBQ Pork Chop Mah Pot 003
Another very cold day outside again. It’s in the low 20’s but feels a lot colder with the wind chill, buts of sunshine to brighten it up a bit. I can’t believe another year has gone by! I just want to thank each and every one of you for all your views and comments throughout the year! Without WordPress I would have never had the chance to connect with all of you. Thank you again! So for dinner tonight i prepared a BBQ Marinated Pork Chop w/ Cut Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, and Wheat Bread.

 

 

 
I had the Pork Chop in the freezer so I let it thaw overnight in the fridge. About noon I added some JB’s Fat Boy Haug Waush BBQ Sauce to a Hefty Zip Bag and added the Chop and let it marinate the rest of the day. When ready to prepare it I took it out of the bag, shaking off the excess. I then seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. i heated up a Cast Iron Skillet, sprayed with a little Pam Cooking Spray and added Canola Oil. When the Skillet and Oil was heated up I added my Chop to it. I fried it about 4 minutes or so per side, till the internal temperature reached 155 degrees. Nice size Chop and it came out moist with a fantastic flavor, love the JB’s Fat Boy Sauce!

 

 

 
For one side dish I heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans, my favorite canned Green Bean. Then I also heated up some Idahoan Mashed Potatoes. They come in a microwavable container; just add water and microwave for 1 1/2 minutes. They come out perfect every time! I also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a Jello Double Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

Thank you again for a lot of fun throughout the year, have a fun and safe New Years Eve!

2013 in review

December 31, 2013 at 1:29 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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Thank you everyone for all your views and comments! Look forward to 2014 and hearing from all of you, thanks again!

 

 

 

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 34,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 13 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

December 31, 2013 at 10:52 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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7 Lucky New Year’s Eve Foods from Reader’s Digest, the link to all 7 is at te bottom of the post.

 
7 Lucky New Year’s Eve FoodsReaders Di
Many of the foods people around the world traditionally eat for luck to ring in the New Year are also good for you. Here are 7 lucky new year’s foods (yes, we believe 7 is a lucky number) worth including at your gathering for a year of prosperity and good health!

 
Greens
Supposedly greens are eaten on New Year’s Eve because they resemble money. They are also teeming with vitamins and minerals so eat up! ….

 

 

 

Beans
Beans, like greens, resemble money. More specifically, they symbolize coins. Whether you choose black beans, lentils or black-eyes peas, try some healthy fiber-filled beans to soak up that champagne.

 
* Click the link below to get all the foods and recipe ideas. *

 

http://www.rd.com/slideshows/7-lucky-new-years-foods/

Seafood of the Week – Dried fish

December 31, 2013 at 10:45 AM | Posted in fish, seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
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A fish flake, such as this one in Norway, is a rack used for drying cod

A fish flake, such as this one in Norway, is a rack used for drying cod

Fresh fish rapidly deteriorates unless some way can be found to preserve it. Drying is a method of food preservation that works by removing water from the food, which inhibits the growth of microorganisms. Open air drying using sun and wind has been practiced since ancient times to preserve food. Water is usually removed by evaporation (air drying, sun drying, smoking or wind drying) but, in the case of freeze-drying, food is first frozen and then the water is removed by sublimation. Bacteria, yeasts and molds need the water in the food to grow, and drying effectively prevents them from surviving in the food.
Fish are preserved through such traditional methods as drying, smoking and salting. The oldest traditional way of preserving fish was to let the wind and sun dry it. Drying food is the world’s oldest known preservation method, and dried fish has a storage life of several years. The method is cheap and effective in suitable climates; the work can be done by the fisherman and family, and the resulting product is easily transported to market.

 

 

 
Stockfish
Stockfish is unsalted fish, especially cod, dried by cold air and wind on wooden racks on the foreshore. The drying racks are known as fish flakes. Cod is the most common fish used in stockfish production, though other whitefish, such as pollock, haddock, ling and tusk, are also used.
Clipfish
Over the centuries, several variants of dried fish have evolved. Stockfish, dried as fresh fish and not salted, is often confused with clipfish, where the fish is salted before drying. After 2–3 weeks in salt the fish has saltmatured, and is transformed from wet salted fish to Clipfish through a drying process. The salted fish was earlier dried on rocks (clips) on the foreshore. The production method of Clipfish (or Bacalhau in Portuguese) was developed by the Portuguese who first mined salt near the brackish water of Aveiro, and brought it to Newfoundland where cod was available in massive quantities. (q.v.). Salting was not economically feasible until the 17th century, when cheap salt from southern Europe became available to the maritime nations of northern Europe.
Stockfish is cured in a process called fermentation where cold adapted bacteria matures the fish, similar to the maturing process of cheese. Clipfish is processed in a chemically curing process called saltmaturing, similar to the maturing processes of other saltmatured products like the Parma ham.

 

 

 

Flattened fish drying in the sun

Flattened fish drying in the sun

The water activity, aw, in a fish is defined as the ratio of the water vapour pressure in the flesh of the fish to the vapour pressure of pure water at the same temperature and pressure. It ranges between 0 and 1, and is a parameter that measures how available the water is in the flesh of the fish. Available water is necessary for the microbial and enzymatic reactions involved in spoilage. There are a number of techniques that have been or are used to tie up the available water or remove it by reducing the aw. Traditionally, techniques such as drying, salting and smoking have been used, and have been used for thousands of years. These techniques can be very simple, for example, by using solar drying. In more recent times, freeze-drying, water binding humectants, and fully automated equipment with temperature and humidity control have been added. Often a combination of these techniques is used.

 

 

 
Salt cod has been produced for at least 500 years, since the time of the European discoveries of the New World. Before refrigeration, there was a need to preserve the codfish; drying and salting are ancient techniques to preserve nutrients and the process makes the codfish tastier.
The Portuguese tried to use this method of drying and salting on several varieties of fish from their waters, but the ideal fish came from much further north. With the “discovery” of Newfoundland in 1497, long after the Basque whalers arrived in Channel-Port aux Basques, they started fishing its cod-rich Grand Banks. Thus, bacalhau became a staple of the Portuguese cuisine, nicknamed Fiel amigo (faithful friend). From the 18th century, the town of Kristiansund in Norway became an important place of purchasing bacalhau or klippfisk (literally “cliff fish”, since the fish was dried on stone cliffs by the sea to begin with.) Since the method was introduced by the Dutchman Jappe Ippes in abt 1690, the town had produced klippfisk and when the Spanish merchants arrived, it became a big industry. The bacalhau or bacalao dish is sometimes said to originate from Kristiansund, where it was introduced by the Spanish and Portuguese fish buyers and became very popular. Bacalao was common everyday food in north west Norway to this day, as it was cheap to make. In later years it is more eaten at special occasions.
This dish was also popular in Portugal and other Roman Catholic countries, because of the many days (Fridays, Lent, and other festivals) on which the Church forbade the eating of meat. Bacalhau dishes were eaten instead.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 31, 2013 at 10:40 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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It may be a pain, but the best way to save on groceries is to shop at more than one market. You’ll soon find that one store will have cheaper produce, one will have cheaper meat, and so forth. Explore grocery stores you’ve never shopped at – perhaps one that is closer to your workplace or gym rather than by your home – and you may find even lower prices. We’ve even found cheaper products at stores that are the same chain, just a different location. Write down the prices of your most frequently purchased items, or bring a receipt from an average grocery trip with you. That way you can be sure to remember where the prices are the most reasonable.

December 31 is National Vinegar Day

December 31, 2013 at 10:35 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Foodimentary - National Food Holidays

vinegar

National Vinegar Day

A day to reflect on the years gone by

Five Food Finds about Vinegar

  • Vinegar has been used for 10,000 years. It just might be the world’s oldest ingredient.
  • The main uses for white distilled vinegar are cooking/food preparation and cleaning/disinfecting.
  • The International Vinegar Museum is in Roslyn, South Dakota.
  • Consumers in the South buy and use more white distilled vinegar than in any other region of the country.
  • Adding vinegar to baking soda produces a chemical reaction that produces carbon dioxide. This combination is often used to make a do-it-yourself erupting volcano.

divt

Today’s Food History

1600 The British East India Company was incorporated by royal charter. It was created to compete in the East Indian spice trade.

1841 Alabama becomes the first state to issue dental licenses.

1853 A New Years Eve dinner party for 21 scientists was held inside a life size model…

View original post 118 more words

Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ ….

December 30, 2013 at 6:12 PM | Posted in Ham, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ore - Ida, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

 

Cajun Turkey Ham Swiss Fries 001

 

Our nice weather left real quickly, snow flurries and a wind chill in the 20’s. Went to the grocery early and then spent most of the afternoon cleaning my Hoveround Chair and then catching up on laundry. For dinner tonight, Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 

I picked up a Jennie – O Premium Portions Hickory Smoked Cajun Style Turkey Breast, try saying that five times real fast! I love these, great sliced, for sandwiches, and just the right size for 1 or 2 people (1.39 lbs). Plus it’s only it’s only 50 calories and 1 carb per serving! It comes already seasoned and precooked. Just serve cold or heated up. I heated up a few slices in the oven for the sandwich. So I had the Turkey and I also had a couple of slices of Kroger Private Selection Oven Roasted Rosemary Ham. Topped it with Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese and Hidden Valley Spicy Chipotle Spread. Served it on a couple of slices of Klosterman Wheat Bread and then grilled in a medium size skillet with a 1/2 Tbs of Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter.

 

 

 

Then for a side I baked some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries, served with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup. For dessert later a Del Monte No Sugar Added Pech Chunk Cup.

 

 

Jennie o sun dried tomato turkey breast

Jennie – O Premium Portions Hickory Smoked Cajun Style Turkey Breast

Ready to cut and serve, hot or cold.
Find this product in the refrigerated section of your grocery store.
Product Features:
* 99% fat free
* Gluten Free
* Great for salads, sandwiches and more
* Fully Cooked
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 2 oz (56 g)
Servings Per Container: varies

Calories 50
Calories from Fat 5
Amount Per Serving and/or % Daily Value*
Total Fat .5 g (1%)
Saturated Fat 0 g (0%)
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 25 mg (8%)
Sodium 610 mg (25%)
Total Carbohydrate 1 g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0 g (0%)
Sugars 1 g
Protein 12 g

 

 
http://www.jennieo.com/products/95-Oven-Roasted-Premium-Portion-Turkey-Breast

One of America’s Favorites – Submarine Sandwich

December 30, 2013 at 10:45 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A submarine sandwich.

A submarine sandwich.

A submarine sandwich, also known as a sub, hoagie, hero, grinder, or one of many regional naming variations, is a sandwich that consists of a long roll of Italian or French bread, split width wise either into two pieces or opened in a “V” on one side, and filled with a variety of meats, cheeses, vegetables, seasonings, and sauces. The sandwich has no standardized name, and many U.S. regions have their own names for it; one study found 13 different names for the sandwich in the United States. The usage of the several terms varies regionally but not in any pattern, as they have been used variously by the people and enterprises who make and sell them. The terms submarine and sub are widespread and not assignable to any certain region, though many of the localized terms are clustered in the northeast United States, where most Italian Americans live.

 

 

The sandwich originated in several different Italian American communities in the Northeastern United States from the late 19th to mid-20th centuries. Portland, Maine claims to be the birthplace of the “Italian sandwich” and it is considered Maine’s signature sandwich. The popularity of this Italian-American cuisine has grown from its origins in Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts to most parts of the United States, Canada, and with the advent of chain restaurants, is now available in many parts of the world. In Europe, it would simply be known as a baguette, or a ciabatta, named after traditional breads long baked in France and Italy.

 

 

Sub sandwich

Sub sandwich

The use of the term “submarine” or “sub” (after the resemblance of the roll to the shape of a submarine) is widespread. One theory is that it originated in a restaurant in Scollay Square in Boston, Massachusetts at the beginning of World War I. The sandwich was created to entice the large numbers of navy servicemen stationed at the Charlestown Navy Yard. The bread was a smaller, specially baked baguette that resembled the hull of the submarines it was named after.
Another theory suggests the submarine was brought to the U.S. by Dominic Conti (1874–1954), an Italian immigrant who came to New York in the early 1900s. He is said to have named it after seeing the recovered 1901 submarine called Fenian Ram in the Paterson Museum of New Jersey in 1918. His granddaughter has stated the following: “My grandfather came to this country circa 1895 from Montella, Italy. Around 1910, he started his grocery store, called Dominic Conti’s Grocery Store, on Mill Street in Paterson, New Jersey where he was selling the traditional Italian sandwiches. His sandwiches were made from a recipe he brought with him from Italy which consisted of a long crust roll, filled with cold cuts, topped with lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, oil, vinegar, Italian herbs and spices, salt, and pepper. The sandwich started with a layer of cheese and ended with a layer of cheese (this was so the bread wouldn’t get soggy).

 

 

The term hoagie originated in the Philadelphia area. The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin reported, in 1953, that Italians working at the World War I–era shipyard in Philadelphia, known as Hog Island where emergency shipping was produced for the war effort, introduced the sandwich, by putting various meats, cheeses, and lettuce between two slices of bread. This became known as the “Hog Island” sandwich; shortened to “Hoggies”, then the “hoagie”.
The Philadelphia Almanac and Citizen’s Manual offers a different explanation, that the sandwich was created by early-twentieth-century street vendors called “hokey-pokey men”, who sold antipasto salad, meats and cookies. When Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta H.M.S. Pinafore opened in Philadelphia in 1879, bakeries produced a long loaf called the pinafore. Entrepreneurial “hokey-pokey men” sliced the loaf in half, stuffed it with antipasto salad, and sold the world’s first “hoagie”.
Another explanation is that the word “hoagie” arose in the late 19th to early 20th century, among the Italian community in South Philadelphia, when “on the hoke” was a slang used to describe a destitute person. Deli owners would give away scraps of cheeses and meats in an Italian bread-roll known as a “hokie”, but the Italian immigrants pronounced it “hoagie”.
Other less likely explanations involve “Hogan” (a nickname for Irish workers at the Hog Island shipyard), a reference to the pork or “hog” meat used in hoagies, “honky sandwich” (using a racial slur for white people seen eating them) or “hooky sandwich” (derived from “hookie” for truant kids seen eating them). Shortly after World War II, there were numerous varieties of the term in use throughout Philadelphia. By the 1940s, the spellings “hoagie” and, to a lesser extent, “hoagy” had come to dominate less used variations like “hoogie” and “hoggie”. By 1955, restaurants throughout the area were using the term “hoagie”, with many selling hoagies and subs or hoagies and pizza. Listings in Pittsburgh show hoagies arriving in 1961 and becoming widespread in that city by 1966.
Former Philadelphia mayor (and later Pennsylvania governor) Ed Rendell declared the hoagie the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia”. However, there are claims that the hoagie was actually a product of nearby Chester, Pennsylvania. DiCostanza’s in Boothwyn, Pennsylvania claims that the mother of DiConstanza’s owner originated the hoagie in 1925 in Chester. DiCostanza relates the story that a customer came into the family deli and through an exchange matching the customer’s requests and the deli’s offerings, the hoagie was created.
A local Philadelphia variation on the hoagie is the zep made in Norristown, Pennsylvania. It is a variation on the traditional hoagie, with no lettuce and only one meat. It is made on a round roll, with provolone cheese covering meat, chunks of raw onion, and slabs of tomato. It is dressed with oregano, salt, pepper, olive oil, and hot pepper relish.

 

The New York term hero is first attested in 1937. The name is sometimes credited to the New York Herald Tribune food writer Clementine Paddleford in the 1930s, but there is no good evidence for this. It is also sometimes claimed that it is related to the gyro, but this is unlikely as the gyro was unknown in the United States until the 1960s, according to some sources.
“Hero” (plural usually heros remains the prevailing New York City term for most sandwiches on an oblong roll with a generally Italian flavor, in addition to the original described above. Pizzeria menus often include eggplant parmigiana, chicken parmigiana, and meatball heros, each served with sauce.

 

 

 

Roast beef grinder

Roast beef grinder

Grinder, a common term in New England, its origin has several possibilities. One theory has the name coming from Italian-American slang for a dock worker, among whom the sandwich was popular Others say it was called a grinder because it took a lot of chewing to eat the hard crust of the bread used.
In western Massachusetts a grinder is specifically a toasted sub, for example, the sub is toasted in a pizza oven. In Pennsylvania and Delaware, the term grinder simply refers to a submarine sandwich that has been heated in any fashion.

From its origins with the Italian American labor force in the Northeastern United States, the sub began to show up on menus of local pizzerias. As time went on and popularity grew, small restaurants, called Hoagie shops and Sub shops, that specialized in the sandwich began to open.
After World War II, Italian food grew in popularity in the US and started to become assimilated. This brought the use of other meats to the sandwich including turkey, roast beef, American and Swiss cheese, as well as spreads such as mayonnaise and mustard.

 

 
Pizzerias may have been among the first Italian-American eateries, but even at the turn of the [20th] century distinctions were clear-cut as to what constituted a true ristorante. To be merely a pizza-maker was to be at the bottom of the culinary and social scale; so many pizzeria owners began offering other dishes, including the hero sandwich (also, depending on the region of the United States, called a ‘wedge,’ a ‘hoagie,’ a ‘sub,’ or a ‘grinder’) made on a Italian loaf of bread with lots of salami, cheese, and peppers.
—John Mariani, America Eats Out, p. 66
By the late 20th century, due to the rise of large franchisee chain restaurants and fast food, the sandwich became available worldwide. Many outlets offer non-traditional ingredient combinations.
In the United States, many chain restaurants have arisen that specialize in subs including Capriotti’s, Submarina, Jersey Mike’s Subs, Charley’s Grilled Subs, Blimpie, Jimmy John’s, Lenny’s Sub Shop, Milio’s, Port of Subs, Eegee’s, Firehouse Subs, Penn Station, Planet Sub, Potbelly, Tubby’s, Schlotzsky’s, Which Wich and D’Angelo Sandwich Shops. Major international chains include Quiznos, Mr. Sub and the largest restaurant chain in the world, Subway. The sandwich is also usually available at supermarkets and convenience stores.

Best Diet Recipes for Snacks

December 30, 2013 at 10:37 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Some healthy hints to help with those snack attacks! From the Eating Well web site, the link is at the bottom of the page.

 

 

 

Best Diet Recipes for Snacks

 

Eating Well

 

Curb your next snack attack with our best diet snack recipes.
When you’re watching your diet, snacking healthfully can keep your hunger at bay. Try one of our best diet recipes for snacks, including popcorn recipes, fruit bar recipes and easy snack recipes, to pack for the office or serve as a healthier after-school snack. Try our Lemon-Parm Popcorn for a low-calorie snack recipe to fill you up throughout the day or Chocolate-Cherry Snack Bars for a diet snack recipe to satisfy your sweet tooth….

 

 

 
Lemon-Parm Popcorn
Perk up your popcorn with a bit of lemon pepper and Parmesan cheese….

 

 

 

 

Chocolate-Cherry Snack Bars
These cereal bars are chewy, crunchy and delicious with good-for-you seeds, nuts, fruit and little explosions of chocolate. We like the flavor of dried cherries or cranberries, but any coarsely chopped dried fruit will work…..

 

 
* Click the link below to get them all! *

 
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/best_diet_recipes_for_snacks?sssdmh=dm17.712371&utm_source=EWDNL&esrc=nwewd122313

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 30, 2013 at 10:31 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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When you’ve been buying the same brand for as long as you can remember, it’s hard to make the switch to generics. However, you’ll be surprised when you find many generic and store-brand products taste exactly the same (or better) for less than half the cost.

 

 

* Always buy generic baking ingredients such as flour, oil, and sugar. These generics are indistinguishable from their more-expensive counterparts. Frozen and canned vegetables are also usually exactly the same.

 

 
* As for products such as cereals, cookies, and crackers basic is better – most have had good luck with plain granola, potato chips, and wheat crackers.

 

 
* No matter what the product, it never hurts to try. If you end up having to throw away one can of soup, you’ve wasted a dollar or two, but if you like it, you can save a lot over the course of a year.

 

 
* Save the boxes from name-brand products your kids are attached to, then empty the generic products into them. Your picky eaters won’t know the difference if they can’t see it on the outside.

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