Steak and Cheese Hoagies w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

April 30, 2012 at 6:15 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, BEEF, cheese, Food | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Steak and Cheese Hoagies w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

This is another keeper recipe, Steak and Cheese Hoagies! This came out one delicious sandwich. I used a London Broil for the steak. I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. I then pan fried it about 4 minutes per side to medium rare. Along with the Steak recipe I left the recipe for the Spiced Mayo and a Worcestershire Mix Sauce at the end of the post. Make sure you make both the sauces they go fantastic with the sandwich. If you like Steak Sandwiches you have to give this a try! I used Aunt Millies Hot Dog Buns for the bread, a lot less calories and carbs than Hoagie Buns.  For sides we had Baked Ore Ida Crinkle Fries. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

Steak and Cheese Hoagies

Ingredients

1 1/2 pound London Broil
Extra Virgin Olive Oil
McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and freshly Ground Black Peppercorn
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon Soy Sauce
1 tablespoon French’s Spicy Brown Mustard
1 teaspoon chopped Rosemary leaves
1/2 teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes
Aunt Millie Hot Dog Buns
Sargento’s Muenster Cheese Slices, 1 slice per sandwich
1/2 cup Kraft Reduced Fat Mayonnaise w/ Olive Oil
1 tablespoon Frank’s Hot Sauce
5 Large Portabella Mushrooms, sliced and sauteed.

Directions

1 Remove steak from refrigerator 2 hours before cooking to bring to room temperature (only do this with whole cuts of meat, never with ground meat.) Add sea salt and freshly ground pepper.

2 Heat a large skillet to medium high heat. Place the beef in the skillet and let it cook for 3-4 minutes on each side, check before flipping to make sure it has nicely browned. At this point, if you have a steak only an inch thick or less, you can take the skillet off the heat and just let the steak sit for several minutes in the skillet, which will retain enough heat to cook the steak to medium rare. You can test for doneness by using a small sharp knife and cutting into the center to check the color. Also, if the steak is brown on both sides and it is weeping red juice.

* If you have a thicker steak, you can finish it off in the oven, at 325°F for 15 minutes or so. Use a meat thermometer to test the internal temperature of the steak. It will be done at 130°F for medium rare. If you are using the oven method, when done, remove from the oven and let sit for 5 minutes.

3 While the Steak is frying, in a medium bowl whisk together the Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, mustard, rosemary, and red pepper flakes. Set aside. Slice and Sautee Mushrooms and set aside.

4 Remove the steak from the pan to a cutting board. Slice the steak thinly and toss the slices in the Worcestershire sauce mixture.

5 Spread the buns open and arrange on a baking sheet.Top each bun with a slice of the cheese and put them under the broiler until the cheese is melted and bubbling, about 1 to 2 minutes.

6 In a small bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise and hot sauce. Spread the mayonnaise onto the bottom of each bun. Put the slices of the beef onto each of the roll and top with the mushroom slices.

 

 

One of America’s Favorite – Buffalo Wings

April 30, 2012 at 10:35 AM | Posted in chicken, Food | 1 Comment
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A Buffalo wing, hot wing or wing is a chicken wing section (drumette or flat) that is traditionally deep-fried unbreaded and then coated

in sauce. Classic Buffalo-style chicken wing sauce is composed of a vinegar-based cayenne pepper hot sauce and butter. Buffalo wings are traditionally served with celery sticks and blue cheese dressing.

Buffalo wings were created in Buffalo, New York. The residents of Buffalo generally refer to them as “wings” or “chicken wings” rather than “Buffalo wings.”
Cayenne pepper hot sauce and melted butter or margarine are the basis of the sauce. Buffalo wing sauce can be made with a variable amount of heat/spiciness, with the names of these sauces generally corresponding to the level of heat, such as mild, medium, or hot. Typically, the wings are deep-fried (although they are sometimes grilled or baked). The wings are usually fried in oil until they reach close to a golden brown color. They are then drained where they can either be placed in a bowl with sauce or seasoned with salt and pepper. Following this, one covers the bowl tightly and shakes to coat the wings. As an alternative to waiting to coat the wings until after they are cooked, one can also put seasoning over the wings in a sealed bag and shake them until they are coated evenly. Afterwards, the wings are arranged on a baking sheet and baked until they are cooked thoroughly. Wings can then be served dry with sauce on the side.

There are four different legends about how Buffalo wings came to be.

*The first story is that Buffalo wings were first prepared at the Anchor Bar by Teressa Lenz, who owned the bar along with her husband Frank. Upon the unannounced, late-night arrival of their son, Dominic, with several of his friends from college, Teressa needed a fast and easy snack to present to her hungry guests. It was then that she came up with the idea of deep frying chicken wings (normally thrown away or reserved for stock) and tossing them in cayenne hot sauce.

*A second version, as told by Dominic Lenz (Frank and Teressa’s son) to The New Yorker reporter Calvin Trillin in 1980, stated: “It was Friday night in the bar and since people were buying a lot of drinks he wanted to do something nice for them at midnight when the mostly Catholic patrons would be able to eat meat again.” He stated that it was his mother, Teressa, who came up with the idea of chicken wings.

*The third version of the origin involved a mis-delivery of wings instead of backs and necks for making the bar’s spaghetti sauce. Faced with this unexpected resource, Frank Lenz says that he asked Teressa to do something with them.

*The fourth version has nothing to do with the Lenz’s or the Anchor Bar. Calvin Trillin stated in his 1980 New Yorker article that a man named Daniel Gorsky also claimed credit for serving chicken wings in a special “mambo sauce”. Chicken wings in mambo sauce became the specialty at his Buffalo restaurant in the mid-1960s. Young had registered the name of his restaurant, Daniel Gorsky’s Wings ‘n Things, at the county courthouse before leaving Buffalo in 1970.

Marketing materials for Frank’s RedHot claim that it was the hot sauce used in the Bellissimos’ original recipe.

Buffalo wings are used in competitive eating events, such as Philadelphia’s Wing Bowl and at the National Buffalo Wing Festival.

The first mention of Buffalo wings on national television may have been on NBC’s Today show in the 1980s. Teressa Bellissimo cooked a batch before the camera, and mentioned that she was using a certain brand of hot sauce by name.[citation needed] Bryant Gumbel commented that the chicken wings looked like “drummies”. Increasingly, since the 1970s, restaurants were promoting an entree of the thicker first joint of the wing, calling them “chickies” or “drummies”, to people who wanted the flavor of traditional “southern fried chicken” in about ten minutes, versus the twenty minutes or more needed to properly fry the thicker breast, thigh, or drumstick portions of a chicken. The dish radically gained prominence nationally after the Buffalo Bills’ four consecutive appearances in the Super Bowl from 1990-1993 focused considerable media attention to the area for an extended period of time, giving Buffalo cuisine significant nationwide exposure. Clips showing cooks preparing the dish continues to be featured on nationally televised sporting events involving the Buffalo Bills and to a lesser extent the Buffalo Sabres.

The Travel Channel show Food Wars held a competition between Anchor Bar and local Buffalo rival Duff’s Famous Wings. Duff’s

A cook preparing Buffalo wings

narrowly won, with Duff’s wings considered to be spicier, while Anchor Bar’s was meatier and fried more well-done.

In “Tailgate Warriors with Guy Fieri”, Buffalo vs. Chicago, the buffalo team made Buffalo Wings.

The appellation “Buffalo” is also now commonly applied to foods other than wings, including chicken fingers, chicken nuggets, popcorn chicken, shrimp and pizza that are seasoned with the Buffalo-style sauce or variations of it.

The flavor of Buffalo wings is replicated by a number of dishes. A common variation on the “buffalo” sauce flavor is found in potato chips produced by a number of different companies. Many of these “Buffalo Chips” also incorporate a simulated blue cheese flavoring to simulate the complete buffalo wing experience.

The Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minnesota serves a more esoteric take on buffalo-flavored food products with their “Buffalo Dog” available at concession stands inside the arena. The hot dog is topped with buffalo sauce, blue cheese, and cole slaw in a unique combination of North Carolina-style slaw dogs and buffalo wings — neither dish is indigenous to the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, and despite buffalo wings’ ubiquity, slaw dogs are uncommon in the Twin Cities.

Diabetic Friendly Buffalo Chicken Wings

April 30, 2012 at 10:31 AM | Posted in chicken, diabetes, diabetes friendly, low calorie, low carb | 1 Comment
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Diabetic Friendly Buffalo Chicken Wings

Make your own Diabetic Friendly Blue Cheese Dipping Sauce and your set!

2 lbs Chicken Wings (about 12 wings)
2 Tbsp Butter, melted. I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter
4 Tbsp Frank’s Red Hot Sauce
1 Tbsp Paprika
1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt
1/2 teaspoon Cayenne Pepper
1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper

Cut off wing tips and then cut the wings at the joint. Put chicken wing pieces in a plastic bag. Set aside.

Stir together the melted butter, hot pepper sauce, paprika, salt, cayenne pepper and black pepper. Pour all but 2 tablespoons of the marinade over the chicken pieces in the plastic bag. (Reserve marinade for coating after the pieces come out of the oven.) Seal bag and let marinate at room temperature for half an hour.

Place wing pieces on the rack of a broiler pan. Broil 4 to 5 inches from the heat for about 10 minutes on each side, until chicken is tender and no longer pink. Remove from oven and baste with reserved marinade.  Serve with a dip of your choice and lots of celery and carrots.

Makes about 24 chicken wings.  And best of all, there’s trace amounts of carbs!

Servings: 8

Amount per Serving

Calories: 234
Carbohydrates: 1g
Dietary Fiber: 0g
Sugars: 0g
Fat: 18g
Saturated: 7g
Trans: 0g
Sodium: 388mg
Protein: 16g

Whole Grain Penne Pasta and Turkey Sausage

April 29, 2012 at 4:59 PM | Posted in cheese, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Johnsonville Meats, Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Pasta | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu:  Whole Grain Penne Pasta and Turkey Sausage w/ Mushrooms, Low Carb Pasta Sauce, and Whole Grain Bread

Whole Grain Penne Pasta and Turkey Sausage tonight, healthy and a true comfort food! I used Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Whole Grain Penne Rigate Pasta, a healthy pasta choice at 180 calories and 41 carbs. For the sauce I used Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce and that being only 70 calories and 6 carbs! I love this sauce it has great flavor and good on any pasta. So you get the full flavor of pasta sauce but not the calories or carbs. Then for the Turkey Sausage I used   Johnsonville Turkey Sausage. The sausage is 110 calories and 0 carbs.

I had precooked and sliced the Turkey Sausage earlier. I then boiled the pasta and while it was boiling I heated the pasta sauce and added the sliced Turkey Sausage and sliced Baby Bella Mushrooms. After boiling and draining the pasta I added the pasta back to pot and added the sauce and sausage to it and mixed until the pasta was well coated. I Seasoned the Pasta with McCormick Grinder Italian Seasoning, Parsley and Sea Salt. Served it with slices of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert/snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.

 

April 29, 2012 at 12:01 PM | Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Let's Spice Things Up

I can eat this every night, its fabulous! 🙂

This is an awesome twist on a normal quesadilla and you have to try it. It’s super easy and soo very flavorful! This is my kind of meal, it’s simple, it doesn’t require 20 ingredients that I don’t have, it’s very easy to make and I can have dinner on the table in less than 30mins, love it!

Mr. Picky loved these! He even had to steal some of mine 🙂

Here’s how to make these:

 

 

 

 

 

 

BBQ Ranch Cajun Chicken Quesadillas

Makes 2 quesadillas

Ingredients:

  • 4 medium size flour tortillas
  • 2 tbsp bacon ranch, divided use (or regular)
  • 2 tbsp your favorite BBQ sauce, divided use (I used Jack Daniel’s)
  • 1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese, divided use
  • 2 medium chicken breasts
  • for cajun seasoning:
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • a pinch of black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp paprika
  • 1/8 tsp…

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Lunch – Chipotle Bison Wrap

April 29, 2012 at 11:44 AM | Posted in bison, cheese, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Flatout Flatbread, JB's Fatboy Sauces and Rub | Leave a comment
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I had a Chipotle Bison Wrap for lunch today. I used the other Bison Sirloin I had grilled the other day for the Wrap. After warming I sliced thin and layered it on the Wrap. For the Wrap I used Flatout Light Original Flat bread. Love these they are 100% Whole Wheat , High Fiber, and only 90 calories and 16 carbs! I topped the Bison with JB’s Fat Boy Chipotle Sauce, sliced Deli Jalapenos, sliced Black Olives and fresh grated Smoked Dutch Gouda. Unfortunately I was out of lettuce which would have went great with this. After assembling the wrap and folding it I put it in the microwave for 35 seconds. The lean and delicious Bison along with heat of the Jalapenos, Chipotle Sauce, and the fresh and creaminess of the Smoked Gouda Cheese just makes an unbelievable Wrap! Gotta Love That Bison!

 

April 29, 2012 at 6:36 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Foodimentary - National Food Holidays

National Shrimp Scampi Day

Five Food Finds about Shrimp Scampi

  • The word “scampi” means “shrimp”.  Therefore, “shrimp scampi” is “shrimp shrimp” (or “scampi scampi”).
  • The pistol shrimp can deliver an explosive attack hotter than the surface of the sun and loud enough to rupture a human ear drum.
  • Every shrimp is actually born male, and some develop into females.
  • Some shrimp are actually capable of glowing in the dark.
  • Shrimp can vary in size from 1/2 inch to 12 inches.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1768 Georg Brandt died. A Swedish chemist, he discovered the element cobalt in 1730. Cobalt is used in steel making, and is an essential part of vitamin B12

1856 A shipment of 33 camels arrived at the Texas port of Indianola. They had been purchased on the North African Coast, for the U.S. army to use in the deserts of the Southwest.

1913

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Marinated Baked Turkey Tenderloin w/ Sweet Potato Casserole, Pasta Salad,…

April 28, 2012 at 5:25 PM | Posted in baking, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Jennie-O Turkey Products, low calorie, pasta, potatoes | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Marinated Baked Turkey Tenderloin w/ Sweet Potato Casserole, Pasta Salad, and Whole Grain Bread


I had a Jennie – O Baked Turkey Tenderloin that I had marinated for three hours in JB’s Fat Boy Sticky Stuff BBQ and added a couple of Adobe Peppers along with a 1/2 teaspoon of Adobe Sauce. After seasoning it with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, and Smoked Cumin I then baked it for 30 minutes covered and thirty minutes uncovered at 350 degrees. The Turkey turned out moist and delicious. The JB’s Fat Boy Sticky Stuff BBQ. Sauce makes a perfect marinade for not only Turkey but also Chicken. The Adobe Peppers and Sauce raised the heat level a bit but not over powering.

For sides I had Margaret Holmes Sweet Potato Casserole. First time I tried it and it’s another Margaret Holmes Product that I’ll keep in stock! It comes in a can so just empty it into a Sauce Pan and heat until warmed. I also had made a Pasta Salad earlier using Ronzoni Garden Delight Rotini. This is the colored Rotini, Enriched Tomato, Carrots, and Spinach Pasta Blend. After cooking the Pasta I added McCormick Grinder Italian Seasoning and Sea Salt for the seasoning. I then added Kraft Free Italian Dressing, 8 pieces of Hormel Turkey Pepperoni (Chopped), 5 Canned Anchovies (Chopped), 6 minced capers, and Kraft Shredded Parm Cheese. Keep in the fridge until ready to use. Also I had Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. With the heat of the Chicken and the sweetness of the Sweet Potatoes it made a perfect combination! For dessert later a Yoplait Chocolate and Banana Smoothie!

Tea production in the United States

April 28, 2012 at 2:59 PM | Posted in green tea | 1 Comment
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Alittle about one of my favorite healthy drinks, Green Tea!

Although Camellia sinensis can be grown in warmer parts of the United States, currently the US mainland has only two commercial tea gardens: a relatively large, fully mechanized plantation in Charleston, South Carolina and a small operation in Burlington, Washington. Off the mainland, there is a collective of roughly 40 small growers in Hawaii.

As of 2010, Washington, South Carolina, and Hawaii Teas are available through mail order and online purchases.

Commercial tea cultivation in the United States has been attempted since 1744 when tea seeds were sent to the Trust Garden in Savannah. The first recorded successful cultivation of the tea plant in the United States is recorded as growing on Skidaway Island near Savannah in 1772. Junius Smith succeeded in growing tea commercially in Greenville, South Carolina, from 1848 until his death in 1853. Dr. Alexis Forster oversaw the next short-lived attempt in Georgetown, South Carolina, from 1874 until his death in 1879. In 1863, the New York Times reported the discovery of tea plants growing natively in Western Maryland and Pennsylvania.

The New York Times report of natively growing tea plants sparked an interest in cultivating the plants commercially. The US Government planted an experimental farm outside Summerville, South Carolina. They ran the program from 1884 until 1888. They concluded that South Carolina’s climate was too unstable to sustain the tea crop. The Department of Agriculture issued a report in 1897 that “estimates the minimum cost about eight times as much to pick one pound of tea in South Carolina as that paid for the same service in Asia.”

In 1888 Dr. Charles Shepard established the Pinehurst Tea Plantation close to the government’s farm. Dr. Shepard secured laborers for the fields by opening a school and making tea-picking part of its curriculum, essentially ensuring a force of child labor while providing them with an education they might not otherwise obtain. Pinehurst produced award winning teas until Dr. Shepard’s death in 1915. The garden closed after Shepard’s death and Pinehurst lay unattended until 1963.

In 1963, The Lipton Tea Company, worried about the instability of the third world countries that produce tea, paid to have the surviving tea plants at Pinehurst moved to a former potato farm on Wadmalaw Island. Lipton operated an experimental tea farm until it was sold in 1987 to Mack Fleming and Bill Hall, who converted the experimental farm into a working tea garden. The Charleston Tea Plantation utilized a converted tobacco harvester to mechanically harvest the tea. The Charleston Tea Plantation sold tea mail order known as American Classic Tea and also produced Sam’s Choice Instant Tea, sold through Sam’s Clubs. American Classic Tea has been the official tea of the White House since 1987. Losing money and nearly bankrupt, in 2003 it was sold to Bigelow Tea Company at a court auction for $1.28 million and was temporarily closed for renovation it in order to attract tourists and boost its revenues. The garden reopened in January 2006 and gives free tours to the public.

Like most plantations, each tea plant at the Charleston Tea Plantation comes from a clone rather than a seed to keep plant characteristics controlled. In this factory, black, oolong, and green tea is made; active harvesting takes place between May and October. The hybrid cotton picker/tobacco harvester modified by Fleming is used to harvest from the upper parts of the plants without injuring them, but cannot do so with the precision of hand-picking, necessary for the highest grades of tea. Inside the factory, leaves are placed on a withering bed for 12–18 hours. Natural air blows over the leaves to reduce the moisture from 80 percent to 68 percent. Then the leaves are chopped, sent to the oxidation bed for 55 minutes, then baked in an oven for about 28 minutes. (These times vary slightly depending on the moisture content of the leaves.) Then the sticks and fibers are sorted out and the remaining leaves are packaged.

Tea was introduced in Hawaii in 1887 and was commercially grown until 1892. While it is not clear why the tea was eventually discontinued, historians believe higher wages compared to other prime tea growing areas in Asia and Africa were among the deciding factors. Lower production costs of tea’s main rival, coffee, also helped prevent it from establishing a foothold.

In the 1960s Lipton and A&B formed a joint venture to investigate the possibility of growing tea commercially in Hawaii. Both companies decided not to open gardens on the Island, but rather to open gardens in Latin and South America.

In 2000 horticulturist Francis Zee found a strain of Camellia sinensis, the tea plant, that can flourish in the tropical climate and volcanic soil of Hawaii. A joint study of commercially growing tea in Hawaii was started by University of Hawaii at Manoa College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources and University of Hawaii at Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

With the decline of the Hawaii’s sugar industry, tea cultivation is seen as a possible replacement crop. In 2003 Hawaii had an estimated 5 acres of land producing tea but by 2005 that number jumped to roughly 80 acres. Tea production in Hawaii is expected to triple by 2008.

In 2004, the Hawaii Tea Society was formed from about 40 members, many of whom had started backyard tea farms to promote tea grown in Hawaii.

The Charleston Tea Plantation

April 28, 2012 at 2:57 PM | Posted in green tea | Leave a comment
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DSC_0219

DSC_0219 (Photo credit: scpetrel)

The Charleston Tea Plantation

The Charleston Tea Plantation is the home of American Classic Tea, tea grown in America. It is located on picturesque Wadmalaw Island in the heart of South Carolina’s Lowcountry. Its grounds include 127 acres of Camellia Sinensis tea plants, a working Tea Factory and a charming Plantation Gift Shoppe. Also available to guests is an adventurous and educational Trolley Tour that explores the scenic grounds that produce American Classic Tea.

About Us

The Charleston Tea Plantation is located on historic Wadmalaw Island in the heart of the Lowcountry of South Carolina.  The history of the Island dates back to mid-June of 1666 when it is believed that Captain Robert Sanford and the crew of the Berkeley Bay landed on the shores of what is now known as Rockville, South Carolina.  On June 23, 1666, he and his crew claimed the land for England and the Lords Proprietors.  Today, Wadmalaw is Oak Archway with Borderconsidered to be one of Charleston’s most unspoiled islands.  It is approximately 10 miles long and 6 miles wide.  The Island’s only connection to the mainland is a bridge that crosses over Church Creek.

Home to The Charleston Tea Plantation, Wadmalaw provides the perfect environment for propagating tea.  With its sandy soils, sub-tropical climate and average rainfall of 52 inches per year, Wadmalaw possess idyllic conditions for the Camellia Sinensis plant.  This plant is currently used to produce both black and green teas and exists in over 320 varieties on the 127 acre grounds of the Charleston Tea Plantation.Top of Tea Field with Border

The Plantation sits right off Maybank Highway.  Driving down Maybank is like taking a step back in time.  Wadmalaw has not and cannot be commercially developed, therefore much of the land remains untouched.  The Island is also home to other unique and historic attractions such as Irvin-House Vineyards, the only domestic winery in Charleston, South Carolina as well as the Angel Oak, a Live Oak tree that is believed to be over 1,500 years old.

Open 7 days a week, with the exception of a few holidays, the Charleston Tea Plantation is the perfect place to take a day trip.  Bring the family, pack a lunch and enjoy the beauty of the tea fields.  The experience is not only educational but more importantly one-of-a-kind.  You will learn first-hand how tea is made during an informative Factory Tour.  You can also take an enjoyable Trolley Ride through the tea fields, shop our unique Plantation Gift Shop and help yourself to all of the iced American Classic Tea you can drink.

Did you know that Bigelow Tea owns the Charleston Tea Plantation?

In 2003, the Bigelow Family purchased the Charleston Tea Plantation and formed a partnership with former owner William Barclay Hall. The Bigelows realized the value of this living piece of American history and decided that it must be preserved. The Bigelows shared their sixty-five years of knowledge and experience in the specialty tea business with the Plantation and its American Classic brand. Consequently, the Charleston Tea Plantation has transformed into a true American icon and American Classic Teas have continued to prosper as a result of consumers wanting to experience tea grown and produced in America. Today the Charleston Tea Plantation offers more than just a cup of fresh tea. Thanks to the Bigelow Family, the true working tea farm presents a learning experience unlike any other in the country!

http://www.charlestonteaplantation.com/

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