One of America’s Favorites – Pork Belly

April 21, 2014 at 9:30 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites, Pork | Leave a comment
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Uncooked pork belly, with rind (skin)

Uncooked pork belly, with rind (skin)

 

Pork belly is a boneless cut of fatty meat from the belly of a pig. Pork belly is popular in Asian cuisine, including the Rafute of Okinawan cuisine, and forms a part of many traditional European dishes such as the Alsatian Choucroute garnie, the Swiss Berner Platte (de), and the German Schlachtplatte. In the United States, bacon is most often made from pork bellies. In Colombian cuisine pork belly strips are fried and served as part of bandeja paisa (chicharon).

A 100-gram serving of pork belly typically has about 520 calories. The calorie breakdown is: 92% fat (53 g), 0% (0 g) carbohydrates, and 8% (9 g) protein.

This cut of meat is enormously popular in Chinese cuisine and Korean cuisine. In Chinese cuisine, it is usually diced, browned then slowly braised with skin on, or sometimes marinated and cooked as a whole slab. Pork belly is used to make Slowly Braised Pork Belly or Dongpo pork in China (Sweet and Sour Pork is made with pork fillet). Koreans cook Samgyeopsal on a grill with garlic, often accompanied by soju. Uncured whole pork belly is a popular dish in American cuisine as well.

 

 

 

Chinese braised pork belly

Chinese braised pork belly

The pork belly futures contract became an icon of futures and commodities trading, frequently used as a placeholder name for commodities in general and appearing in several depictions of the field in popular media (such as the 1974 movie For Pete’s Sake and the 1983 movie Trading Places). Inaugurated in 1961 on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME), frozen pork belly futures were developed as a risk management device to meet the needs of meat packers who processed pork and had to contend with volatile hog prices, as well as price risks on processed products held in inventory. The futures contracts were useful in guiding inventories and establishing forward pricing. The unit of trading was 20 short tons (40,000 lb or 18,000 kg) of frozen, trimmed bellies. (Bellies typically weigh around 6 kg (13 lb).) Pork bellies can be kept in cold storage for an extended period of time, and generally it was the frozen bellies that were most actively traded. Spot prices vary depending on the amount of inventory in cold storage and the seasonal demand for bacon as well as the origin of the pork; in the past, the former drove the prices of the futures as well.

In more recent years pork belly futures’ prominence declined; eventually they were among the least-traded contracts on the CME, and were delisted for trading on July 18, 2011.

 

 

 

 
Then from the Pork Be Inspired website
Belly Basics
Pork belly comes from a hog’s ‘belly’ or underside after the loin and spareribs have been removed. This boneless cut may be served fresh, which means it is not cured or smoked.

Fresh belly is succulent and richly flavorful and is often served in small portions. Pork belly is at its best and is most tender when prepared using a slow cooking method, such as braising. Pork belly also is a popular menu item among restaurant chefs who appreciate its versatility, flavor and texture.

Butcher Tips
Request a leaner cut (relatively speaking, as this is not a traditionally lean cut) and be sure to specify whether you prefer it with or without skin. If you plan to make bacon, pork belly without skin will yield the best results.

Pork belly is not widely available in supermarkets, but can be ordered by meatcase managers upon request.

 

 

- See more at: http://www.porkbeinspired.com/Cut_Belly.aspx#sthash.jLL9aXEs.dpuf

Braised Pork Belly with Creamy Grits

April 21, 2014 at 9:26 AM | Posted in Pork | Leave a comment
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From the pork Be Inspired website its Braised Pork Belly with Creamy Grits!

 

Braised Pork Belly with Creamy Grits

 

Ingredients
2 1/2 to 3 pounds pork belly, skin removed
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper, freshly ground
1/4 cup clarified butter, OR grapeseed oil
1 bottle pinot noir, or other red wine
4 cups veal stock, OR vegetable stock (32 ounces)
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
1 rib celery, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 large carrot, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1/2 ounces fresh thyme leaves
6 teaspoons honey, light flavored (such as alfalfa)

Creamy Grits:

2 cups heavy cream
2 cups water
1 cup white grits, OR yellow grits or polenta (not instant)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon white pepper

Cooking Directions

Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Using a very sharp knife, carefully split pork belly crosswise in half. Season both sides of both pieces with salt and pepper.

Heat 2 tablespoons clarified butter in a large heavy skillet or 6-quart braiser pan. Add one pork belly piece, fat side down. Cook until fat is nicely brown, about 3 to 5 minutes. Turn pork belly piece over and brown the other side. Transfer pork belly to a plate; discard fat in skillet or pan. Repeat browning with remaining 2 tablespoons clarified butter and pork belly piece. Discard fat from skillet or pan.

With skillet or braiser pan away from heat, add 1/3 cup wine. Return skillet or pan to heat and cook over low heat, scraping brown bits from bottom of pan; remove from heat. If using braiser pan, return pork belly pieces to pan. If using skillet, pour liquid from skillet into a 6-quart Dutch oven and add pork. To the pork, add remaining wine, stock, onion, celery, carrot and thyme. Bring to boil and cover tightly

Bake in preheated oven for 3 1/2 to 4 hours. Remove and let pork belly cool completely. Reserve braising liquid.

Portion pork belly into 3 ounce to 4 ounce rectangle pieces. Place belly pieces in a large skillet or braising pan with enough of the braising liquid to cover.

Reheat on stove top over medium heat for 5 to 10 minutes or until the internal temperature reaches 155 degrees F.

Creamy grits: Bring heavy cream and water to a boil in a large, heavy saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low. Slowly stir in grits. Cook over medium-low heat for 5 to 10 minutes until fully cooked. Stir in salt and pepper.

Serving Suggestions: Serve pork belly portions over a small mound of grits and drizzle with honey. If desired, drizzle with 1 to 2 tablespoons hot strained braising liquid and garnish with snipped thyme.

Makes 6 servings pork and 3 cups creamy grits.

Quick tips: Look for pork bellies at Asian or Hispanic markets or order them online if your supermarket or butcher shop does not carry them.
For a cook who does not want to make their own clarified butter, use grapeseed oil because it too has a high smoke point and bland in flavor.

Recipe courtesy of Chef Mark Hibbs of Ratcliffe on the Green in Charlotte, N.C.

Serving Suggestions
Recipe courtesy of Chef Mark Hibbs of Ratcliffe on the Green in Charlotte, N.C. Created for the Share Our Strength’s Taste Of The Nation.

Nutrition Information
Calories: 960 calories
Protein: 13 grams
Fat: 79 grams
Sodium: 1120 milligrams
Cholesterol: 175 milligrams
Saturated Fat: 37 grams
Carbohydrates: 34 grams
Fiber: 1 grams

 

 

- See more at: http://www.porkbeinspired.com/RecipeDetail/2103/Braised_Pork_Belly_with_Creamy_Grits.aspx#sthash.cx4jSt3u.dpuf

Roasted Mesquite Marinated Pork Sirloin w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Green Beans

April 8, 2014 at 5:29 PM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Roasted Mesquite Marinated Pork Sirloin w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Green Beans

 

Mesquite Pork Loin 007

 
More heavy rain overnight but a sunny afternoon, more rain coming this evening though. Finally drying out tomorrow and 70 degrees by Thursday! Took Dad for a follow-up check-up at his doctors. He’s still having more and more problems with breathing, a lot congestion. For dinner tonight I prepared a Roasted Mesquite Marinated Pork Sirloin w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Green Beans.

 

 

 

 

I used a Smithfield Mesquite Marinated Pork Sirloin. First time I believe I used that. It wasn’t a very big one, only 1.39 lbs. But more than enough for me, Mom and Dad went out to eat. The instructions said to roast it 20 minutes for every lb. at 425 degrees. Preheated the oven and put the Sirloin in a small baking pan that i sprayed with Pam Cooking Spray. I also added just a bit of McCormick Grinder Sea salt and Black Peppercorn. Then I Brushed it with JB’s Fat Boy Haug Waush BBQ Sauce. Put in the oven and let it roast! Checked the temperature after about 24 minutes, wasn’t quite done so roasted it an additional 3 minutes. Rechecked it and it was 148 degrees, removed it from the oven and let it rest and finish cooking. It came out beautiful and delicious, very tender. The Mesquite Marinade with the JB’s BBQ Glaze worked perfect.

 

Mesquite Pork Loin 005

 
I also prepared some Bob Evans Mashed Potatoes, microwave a total of 6 minutes and their done and just as good as anyone’s homemade Mashed Potatoes. Then I also heated up a small can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. To drink an ice-cold Diet Dr. Pepper that I had let set in the freezer for about 15 minutes. For dessert/snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.

 

 

 

Mesquite Pork Loin 002
Smithfield Marinated Pork Sirloins – Mesquite

 
Marinated Pork
Smithfield Marinated Pork products are perfect for a delicious artisan meal that is easy yet sure to impress. Ready to enjoy in 20 to 30 minutes, they are the perfect solution for busy families on the go. Instead of doing takeout, throw one of our tenderloins, roasts or filets on the grill or in the oven and you have a delicious, perfectly seasoned home-cooked meal. In addition, we have lowered the sodium in all of our marinated pork products an average of 25.5 percent, making them healthier than ever.
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 4 oz
Amount Per Serving
Calories: 130 Calories from Fat: 36
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 4.0g 6%
Saturated Fat 1.5g 8%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 55.0mg 18%
Sodium 330.0mg 14%
Total Carbohydrate 4g
Dietry Fiber 0g
Sugars 1g
Protein 19.0g

 

http://www.smithfield.com/products/marinated-pork/tenderloins/

These Cuts of Meat Can Save You Money — And Still Taste Great

March 26, 2014 at 9:46 AM | Posted in Delish | Leave a comment
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Fantastic article from the Delish website! It’s all about Cuts of Meat Can Save You Money — And Still Taste Great. Take time and check this one out!

 

 

Delish

These Cuts of Meat Can Save You Money — And Still Taste Great
Asking “chicken, beef, or pork?” doesn’t even begin to cover the dinner options available to meat lovers. Chances are, if you look at the meat section in your grocery store a little closer, you’ll see some cuts you’ve never noticed before. The following cuts of meat, often passed over for their more well-known counterparts, are just as delicious and can actually save you money. Here’s what you need to know to get a good deal in the meat department.

 
Top Round Steak

You might have seen this meat at the store, sometimes labeled London Broil, but we’re guessing you rarely — if ever — grab it. Top round has earned a reputation for being tough, but that’s not always its fate. This cut is perfect for medium cooking and begs to be doused in your favorite marinade. As long as you cut against the grain and don’t overcook it, top round can be a great addition to your dinner rotation…..

 

 

 
Flank Steak

You might see flank steak on its own at a restaurant, but it’s a lot easier to tenderize if incorporated into a larger dish when you’re doing all the work at home. Flank steak is one of a group of cuts called flat steaks, which are tougher cuts of meat. You’ll save money on this cut for two main reasons: your options for preparing flank steak are limited — you’ll have to work to get it tender — and it’s best served in a dish like fajitas, meaning your meat will go further than if you were eating a traditional steak dinner. You can also get away with buying a little less because everyone’s plate will be full of other fajita fixings.

 

 

 

 

* Click the link be low to get all the Cuts of Meat Can Save You Money

 

 

http://www.delish.com/recipes/cooking-recipes/cheapest-cuts-meat?src=nl&mag=del&list=nl_dnl_fot_non_032614_cheap-meat#slide-1

Baked Pork Chops w/ Herb Seasoned Red Potatoes and Cut Green Beans

March 11, 2014 at 5:13 PM | Posted in greenbeans, JB's Fatboy Sauces and Rub, pork chops, potatoes | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Pork Chops w/ Herb Seasoned Red Potatoes and Cut Green Beans

 

 

 

Baked Chops Herb Red Potatoes 004

 

You might know I’m missing being outside on 2 of our warmest days of the year so far. Still battling a Sinus infection, so it was another day of the Bed and Remote! Gorgeous day out though, sunny and low 60′s. But starting tonight a  cold front is moving in and by Thursday Morning a low in the teens and a high of 35. Warming up again by Friday though. My Dad is still in the hospital with pneumonia,  somewhat better today though. So for dinner it was just me and Mom and I prepared us a Baked Pork Chops w/ Herb Seasoned Red Potatoes and Cut Green Beans.

 

 

 

 

Baked Chops Herb Red Potatoes 001
While at Costco yesterday I picked up a package of their Pork Loin Chops. Costco has some of the finest meats around and the Pork Chops are right there with some of the best! I started by marinating them in J B’s Fat Boy’s Haugwash Barbcue Sauce. Just the name Fat Boy’s Haugwash makes my mouth water! If you’ve never tried any of their Rubs or Sauces you got to give them a try! The best I’ve ever had, bar none. Wish it was a little lower in calories and carbs but it’s worth cutting back on other things to fit this in the dinner. Anyway I marinated the Chops in the Sauce and refrigerated it for 4 hours. I removed the chops from the fridge and shook off any excess of the sauce and then seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Grinder Black Peppercorn. I then pan fried the Chops in a Cast Iron Skillet, browning both sides then baked the Chops at 400 degrees for 20 minutes flipping the Chops over after 10 minutes, internal temperature was at 150 degrees. They came out moist, tender, and delicious!

 

 

 

Baked Chops Herb Red Potatoes 002
For the Red Potatoes I needed 1 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 tablespoon minced fresh or Dried Rosemary, 1 tablespoon Dried Thyme, 1/2 teaspoon Sea Salt, and 1/4 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper. I combined all ingredients in a large bowl and tossed to coat potatoes. Transfer potatoes to a shallow roasting pan. Roasted for about 30 minutes, until tender and golden. I baked them at 400 degrees, same as the Pork Chops so I was able to bake them with the Chops at the same time. I also heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans along with a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert/snack later, slices of Cracker Barrel 2% Sharp Cheddar Cheese and Ritz Whole Grain Crackers.

One of America’s Favorites – Cuban Sandwich

March 3, 2014 at 8:52 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cuban sandwich

Cuban sandwich

A Cuban sandwich is a variation of a ham and cheese originally created in cafes catering to Cuban workers in the early Cuban immigrant communities of Florida: Key West and Ybor City, Tampa. Later on, Cuban exiles and expatriates brought it to Miami where it is also still very popular. The sandwich is made with ham, roasted pork, Swiss cheese, pickles, mustard, and sometimes salami on Cuban bread.
In April 2012, the “Historic Tampa Cuban Sandwich” was designated as the “signature sandwich of the city of Tampa” by Tampa’s city council.

 

 

 
As with Cuban bread, the origin of the Cuban sandwich (sometimes called a “Cuban mix”, a “mixto”, a “Cuban pressed sandwich”, or a “Cubano”) is murky and somewhat controversial. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, travel between Cuba and Florida was easy, especially from Key West and Tampa, and Cubans frequently sailed back and forth for employment, pleasure, and family visits. Because of this constant and largely undocumented movement of people and culture and ideas, it’s impossible to say exactly when or where the Cuban sandwich originated.
It is believed by some that the sandwich was a common lunch food for workers in both the cigar factories and sugar mills of Cuba (especially in big cities such as Havana or Santiago de Cuba) and the cigar factories of Key West by the 1860s. Historian Loy Glenn Westfall states that the sandwich was “born in Cuba and educated in Key West”.
The cigar industry in Florida shifted to Tampa in the 1880s and the sandwich quickly appeared in workers’ cafés in Ybor City and (later) West Tampa, leading other historians to theorize that the sandwich as now constituted first appeared there Historian Andrew Huse states that “the old ‘mixtos’ coalesced into something more distinct – the Cuban sandwiches we know and love – an original Tampa creation.”
By the 1960s, Cuban sandwiches were also common on Miami cafeteria and restaurant menus, as the city had gained a large influx of Cuban residents after Fidel Castro’s 1959 rise to power in their native land. The Communist Revolution caused a wave of Cuban expatriates to settle in other locations as well, and they brought their culture and cuisine with them. Cuban sandwiches and variations thereof are now served in various Cuban exile communities in places such as New York, New Jersey, Chicago, and Puerto Rico, among others.

 

 

 

Cuban Sandwiches ready to be pressed in a busy cafe in Ybor City, Tampa

Cuban Sandwiches ready to be pressed in a busy cafe in Ybor City, Tampa

While there is some debate as to the contents of a “true” Cuban sandwich, most are generally agreed upon. The traditional Cuban sandwich starts with Cuban bread. The loaf is sliced into lengths of 8-12 inches (20–30 cm), lightly buttered or brushed with olive oil on the crust, and cut in half horizontally. A coat of yellow mustard is spread on the bread. Then roast pork, glazed ham, Swiss cheese, and thinly-sliced dill pickles are added in layers. Sometimes the pork is marinated in mojo and slow roasted.
The main regional disagreement about the sandwich’s recipe is whether or not to include salami. In Tampa, Genoa salami is traditionally layered in with the other meats, probably due to influence of Italian immigrants who lived side-by-side with Cubans and Spaniards in Ybor City. In South Florida, salami is left out. Mayonnaise, lettuce, and/or tomato are usually available options on Florida menus but are frowned upon by traditionalists.
When assembled, the sandwich can be toasted in a sandwich press called a plancha, which is similar to a panini press but without grooved surfaces. The plancha both heats and compresses the sandwich, which remains in the press until the bread surface is slightly crispy and the cheese is melted. It is usually cut into diagonal halves before serving.

 

 

 
A very similar and popular sandwich is the medianoche or “midnight” sandwich, so named because of the sandwich’s popularity as a staple served in Havana’s night clubs right around or after midnight. It contains the same ingredients as a Cuban sandwich but is smaller and is made on soft bread made from a sweet yellow egg dough, similar to challah.
The Mexican sandwich-like torta has a variation called “torta cubana” (Cuban torta), which includes a collection of different meats, usually all the ones available at the place where the torta is prepared.

 

Bacon-Wrapped Blackberry Pork Roast w/ Green Beans & Potatoes and Boiled Carrots

February 20, 2014 at 6:12 PM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products, pork roast, pork tenderloin, vegetables | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Bacon-Wrapped Blackberry Pork Roast w/ Green Beans & Potatoes and Boiled Carrots

 

 

 

Blackberry Bacon wrapped Pork Roast 011
The weather is something around here! In some places we have 4-5 inches still on the ground, then this morning it was pouring the rain along with thunder and lightning. Then as the afternoon hit, the sun came out briefly and it warmed up to the mid 50′s. Then tonight some heavy rain and wind coming through, welcome to Southwest Ohio! Hopefully Spring Weather is coming soon! Well for dinner tonight another new recipe, Bacon-Wrapped Blackberry Pork Roast w/ Green Beans & Potatoes and Boiled Carrots.

 

 

 
Came across this recipe from the Food Network Magazine and it looked and sounded too good not to give it a try! Come on Pork Roast marinated in Blackberry Preserves, sounded good to me. To prepare it I needed; 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard, 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme, Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, 1 4 -to-5-pound boneless center-cut pork loin, trimmed, 1 clove garlic (smashed), 2 red onions, quartered, and 8 slices turkey bacon. Sounding good now doesn’t it! I used Polaner Sugar Free Blackberry Preserves, only 10 calories and 2 net carbs per serving, and for the bacon I used Jennie – O Turkey Bacon which is only 30 calories and 0 carbs per slice. I also used a smaller Pork Loin than what the recipe called for.

 

 

Blackberry Bacon wrapped Pork Roast 002

Then to prepare it was very easy. I combined the preserves, with 1 tablespoon vinegar, the mustard, thyme and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper in a small bowl. Poked the pork in a few spots with a paring knife, then rubbed with the garlic; seasoned with salt and pepper. Then rubbed the pork all over with the preserves mixture, then transferred to a large Hefty resealable bag and refrigerated overnight.

 

 

 

Then today, about 20 minutes before roasting, I removed the pork from the refrigerator and preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Put the red onions in a metal roasting pan and set a rack on top. Wrap the pork with the bacon, then set on the rack. Roasted until the bacon was crisp and a thermometer inserted into the center of the pork registered 145 degrees F, about 1 1/2 hours. Let it rest 10 minutes before serving. It called for making a gravy out of the drippings but I decided not to make the gravy. The Pork came out with just an incredible flavor! The sweetness of the Blackberry Preserves along with the smokieness that the Turkey Bacon provided along with all the other ingredients worked perfect with Pork. Everyone enjoyed this one, another keeper recipe! If you’re a fan of Pork Roasts you have to try this one. I’ve left the original recipe along with its web link at the bottom of the post.

 

 

 

Then for the side dishes it was the Big 3 of Vegetables, Green Beans, Potatoes, and Carrots. I heated up a can of the Del Monte Cut Green Beans & Potatoes. Then I boiled some whole Mini Carrots. Also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a bowl of Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunks.

 

 

 

 
Bacon-Wrapped Blackberry Pork RoastBlackberry Bacon wrapped Pork Roast 004

Recipe courtesy of Food Network Kitchens
Ingredients
1/4 cup blackberry preserves
3 tablespoons white wine vinegar or champagne vinegar
2 tablespoons dijon mustard
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 4 -to-5-pound boneless center-cut pork loin, trimmed
1 clove garlic, smashed
2 red onions, quartered
8 slices bacon
2 tablespoons instant flour (such as Wondra)
3 cups low-sodium chicken broth

Directions
Combine the preserves, 1 tablespoon vinegar, the mustard, thyme and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper in a small bowl. Poke the pork in a few spots with a paring knife, then rub with the garlic; season with salt and pepper. Rub the pork all over with the preserves mixture, then transfer to a large resealable bag and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight.

About 20 minutes before roasting, remove the pork from the refrigerator and preheat the oven to 325 degrees F. Put the red onions in a metal roasting pan and set a rack on top. Wrap the pork with the bacon (see below), then set on the rack. Roast until the bacon is crisp and a thermometer inserted into the center of the pork registers 145 degrees F, about 1 1/2 hours. Transfer the pork to a cutting board; let rest 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the gravy: Discard all but 2 tablespoons of the drippings from the pan. Place the roasting pan over 2 burners over medium-low heat and whisk in the flour until incorporated. Add the chicken broth and whisk until thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons vinegar and season with salt and pepper.

Serve with the onions and gravy

 

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/bacon-wrapped-blackberry-pork-roast.html?oc=linkback

One of America’s Favorites – Pigs in Blankets

February 3, 2014 at 9:53 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites, Pillsbury | Leave a comment
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American-style pigs in a blanket

American-style pigs in a blanket

Pigs in blankets (also known as Wesley Dogs in parts of the US, and kilted sausages in Scotland[citation needed] refers to a variety of different sausage-based foods in the United States, United Kingdom, Denmark, Australia, Ireland, Germany, Belgium, Russia, Canada, and Japan. They are typically small in size and can be eaten in one or two bites. For this reason, they are usually served as an appetizer or hors d’oeuvre or are accompanied by other dishes in the ‘main course’ section of a meal. In the West, especially in the United States and Canada, the bite-sized variety of pigs in a blanket is a common hors d’oeuvre served at cocktail parties and is often accompanied by a mustard or aioli dipping sauce.
Pigs in a blanket are usually different from sausage rolls, which are a larger, more filling item served for breakfast and lunch in parts of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and, more rarely, the United States and Canada.

 

 

 

In the United States, the term “pigs in a blanket” often refers to hot dogs, Vienna sausages, cocktail or breakfast/link sausages wrapped in biscuit dough, pancake, or croissant dough, and baked. The dough is sometimes homemade, but canned dough is most common. They are somewhat similar to a sausage roll or (by extension) a baked corn dog. They are served as an appetizer, a children’s dish, or as a breakfast entree. A common variation is to stuff the hot dog or sausage with cheese before wrapping it in dough.
At breakfast or brunch, the term “pigs in a blanket” refers to sausage links with pancake wrapped around it.
In regions heavily influenced by Polish immigrants, such as northern Pennsylvania, the southern tier of New York, and northeastern Ohio, the term usually refers instead to stuffed cabbage rolls, such as the Polish gołąbki.
In much of central and southeast Texas (including Austin and Houston) the term “kolache” has been widely misappropriated to describe a variety of dough-wrapped breakfast goods, including sausages of several types wrapped in both biscuit and croissant dough.[citation needed] It would seem that the term “klobasnek” is more technically correct for this variety; perhaps[tone] “kolache” was deemed easier to pronounce and was therefore seized upon by local merchants. They can be found in virtually every doughnut shop, and at least one “kolache-themed” chain is currently in operation.
The American Farm Bureau Foundation’s Dates to Celebrate Agriculture calendar includes a “National Pigs-in-a-Blanket Day” to be observed every April 24.

 

 

 

Christmas Dinner in the UK - pigs in blankets at top right of plate

Christmas Dinner in the UK – pigs in blankets at top right of plate

In the United Kingdom, “pigs in blankets” refers to small sausages (usually Chipolatas) wrapped in bacon. They are a traditional accompaniment to roast turkey for Christmas dinner. They are also known as Tiger tails in The Westcountry. Pigs in blankets can be accompanied with devils on horseback, an appetizer of prunes, or less commonly dates, wrapped in bacon.

 

 

 

The name can also refer to klobasnek (a kind of kolache filled with sausage or ham slices). The German Würstchen im Schlafrock (“sausage in a dressing gown”) uses sausages wrapped in puff pastry or, more rarely, pancakes. Cheese and bacon are sometimes present.
In Russia, this dish is named Сосиска в тесте (Sosiska v teste, “sausage in dough”).
In Israel, Moshe Ba’Teiva (Moses in the ark) is a children’s dish consisting of a hot dog rolled in a ketchup-covered sheet of puff pastry or phyllo dough and baked.
In Denmark, they have a dish similar to the British-style dish known as the “Pølse i svøb” which means “Sausage in blanket”. The American-style Pigs in a blanket are known as “Pølsehorn”, meaning “Sausage horns”.
In Finland, pigs in blanket is known as “nakkipiilo”, which means “hidden sausage” if it is translated freely.
In Mexico, the sausage is wrapped in tortilla and deep fried in vegetable oil. The name “salchitaco” comes from the fusion of the words “salchicha”(sausage) and taco (sausage taco).

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s my favorite way to make a Pig in the Blanket, from http://www.pillsbury.com/recipes/crescent-dogs/b19c6c07-bad8-45b5-8a4e-e604f30baa98?p=1  When I make these I use Hillshire Farms Turkey Lil Smokies and the Pillsbury Reduced Fat Crescent Rolls.

 

 

Crescent Dogs

Ingredients:
8 hot dogs
4 slices (3/4 oz each) American cheese, each cut into 6 strips
1 can (8 oz) Pillsbury® refrigerated crescent dinner rolls

Directions:

1 – Heat oven to 375°F. Slit hot dogs to within 1/2 inch of ends; insert 3 strips of cheese into each slit.
2 – Separate dough into triangles. Wrap dough triangle around each hot dog. Place on ungreased cookie sheet, cheese side up.
3 – Bake at 375°F. for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown.
Nutrition Information

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Sandwich Calories290 ( Calories from Fat200), % Daily Value Total Fat23g23% (Saturated Fat9g,9% Trans Fat2g2% ), Cholesterol35mg35%; Sodium810mg810%; Total Carbohydrate13g13% (Dietary Fiber0g0% Sugars4g4% ), Protein9g9% ; % Daily Value*: Vitamin A2%; Vitamin C0%; Calcium6%; Iron6%;
Exchanges:1 Starch; 0 Fruit; 0 Other Carbohydrate; 0 Skim Milk; 0 Low-Fat Milk; 0 Milk; 0 Vegetable; 0 Very Lean Meat; 0 Lean Meat; 1 High-Fat Meat; 2 1/2 Fat;
Carbohydrate Choices:1
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs w/ Mashed Potatoes, Mini Ears of Sweet Corn, and …

January 26, 2014 at 6:13 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Crock Pot, Pork, ribs | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs w/ Mashed Potatoes, Mini Ears of Sweet Corn, and 3 Bean Salad

 

 

 

Crock Pot Ribs 002

 

The temps weren’t too bad this morning when I ventured out to fetch the paper, above zero at least and little to no wind. But as the day went on it gradually got colder and it’s supposed to keep dropping, minus 10 by Tuesday morning! Everyone wanted Ribs for dinner so I cut the rack of ribs up and let them marinate overnight in the fridge. Dinner tonight, I prepared Crock Pot Pork Back Ribs w/ Mashed Potatoes, Mini Ears of Sweet Corn, and 3 Bean Salad.

 

 

 

Crock Pot Ribs 001

Ready for the Crock Pot

I purchased the Ribs from Kroger the other day. They always have some of the best top quality Pork, too bad their Beef isn’t as good! Last night before I went to bed I cut the Ribs in half, so they’ll fit in the Crock Pot, and put each half in a Hefty Gallon Plastic Bag then covered the Ribs in JB’s Fat Boy Haug Waush BBQ Sauce to marinate all night in the fridge. Then this morning I got out the Crock Pot, lined it with a Reynold’s Crock Pot Plastic Liner, and sprayed that with Pam Non-Stick Spray. Got the Ribs out of the fridge and the bags, discarded the Hefty Bags, and put them in the Crock Pot where I let them cook and simmer, on low, for about 8 hours. Long up in the afternoon you can start smelling the aroma of the Ribs, intoxicating! After 8 hours their ready and now for the hard part of cooking them, getting them out whole without breaking them up! Their that tender, when eating them you need no knife, the bones just slide out. Tender, moist and just full of flavor! For all of us JB’s Fat Boy Sauces and Rubs can’t be beat. The Ribs are incredible! Plus I love using that Crock Pot, no mess and with the plastic liner in the Crock Pot no clean-up. Just wipe it down and store it for the next time.

 

 

 
For one side I heated up some Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes, just microwave for a total of 6 minutes and their ready. Then I boiled some Green Giant Mini Ears of Sweet Corn. A great replacement, and sometimes better, for fresh Corn on the Cob. Then I opened up a can of Read 3 Bean Salad. A delicious Sunday Dinner! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

 
Pork RibsPork back ribs
Pork ribs are a cut of pork popular in North American and Asian cuisines. The ribcage of a domestic pig, meat and bones together, is cut into usable pieces, prepared by smoking, grilling, or baking – usually with a sauce, often barbecue – and then served.
Several different types of ribs are available, depending on the section of rib cage from which they are cut. Variation in the thickness of the meat and bone, as well as levels of fat in each cut, can alter the flavor and texture of the prepared dish. The inner surface of the rib cage is covered by a layer of connective tissue (pleura) that is difficult to cook tender; it is usually removed before marinating or cooking.

Best Diet Recipes of 2013

January 3, 2014 at 10:02 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Best Diet Recipes of 2013

Eating Well
From low-calorie breakfasts to diet dinners, our top 50 diet recipes of 2013.
If your New Year’s resolution is to slim down, our best diet recipes of 2013 can help you stick to your weight-loss goals! We’ve collected our very best diet recipes for all of the seasons. From quick breakfasts to hearty dinners, these top diet recipes are so flavorful and filling you won’t even realize they’re low-calorie. Try our Chicken Taco Bowls for a diet Mexican dish or Coconut-Carrot Morning Glory Muffins for a make-ahead breakfast or snack.

 

 

 

Buffalo Chicken Salad
All the flavor of Buffalo chicken wings is packed into this irresistible, healthy salad. But unlike chicken wings, you can eat a big serving of this healthy Buffalo chicken salad recipe for just 291 calories……

 

 

 

Veggistrone
This vegetable-packed minestrone soup recipe is inspired by a popular Weight Watchers vegetable soup recipe. It makes a big pot of soup, so keep some in the refrigerator for up to 5 days and freeze the rest of the vegetable minestrone soup in single-serve portions. That way you always have an easy, delicious vegetable soup to start your meal or to eat for lunch. Think of this vegetable minestrone recipe as a starting point for other healthy soup variations, too: toss in leftover chopped cooked chicken or whole-wheat pasta or brown rice to make it more satisfying……

 

 

 

* Click the link below to all these healthy recipes *

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/best_diet_recipes_of_2013?sssdmh=dm17.712647&utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw122413

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