Fall Harvest: Celeriac/Celery Root

September 27, 2013 at 8:50 AM | Posted in vegetables | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Celeriac/celery root is at its best in the cooler months of fall, winter, and early spring (except in cold climates, where you’ll find it during the summer and early fall).

 

 

A celeriac hypocotyl sliced in half, and with the greens removed

A celeriac hypocotyl sliced in half, and with the greens removed

Celeriac (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum), also called turnip-rooted celery or knob celery, is a variety of celery cultivated for its edible roots, hypocotyl, and shoots; these are sometimes collectively (but erroneously) called celery root.
Celeriac is a root vegetable with a bulbous hypocotyl. In the Mediterranean Basin and in Northern Europe, celeriac grows wild and is widely cultivated. It is also cultivated in North Africa, Siberia, Southwest Asia, and North America. In North America, the Diamant cultivar predominates. Celeriac originated in the Mediterranean Basin.

 
Typically, celeriac is harvested when its hypocotyl is 10–14 cm in diameter. It is edible raw or cooked, and tastes similar to the stalks (the upper part of the stem) of common celery cultivars. Celeriac may be roasted, stewed, blanched, or mashed. Sliced celeriac occurs as an ingredient in soups, casseroles, and other savory dishes.
Unlike many root vegetables, celeriac contains little starch: 5–6% by weight. A number of vitamins and minerals are present in celery root, most notably vitamin C, potassium, and phosphorus.
The shelf life of celeriac is approximately three to four months if stored between 0°C (32°F) and 5°C (41°F), and not allowed to dry out.

One of America’s Favorites – the Cinnamon Roll

August 13, 2012 at 9:55 AM | Posted in cooking, dessert, Food | 6 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A cinnamon roll (also cinnamon bun, cinnamon swirl and cinnamon snail is a sweet roll served commonly in Northern Europeand

A cinnamon roll with glaze

North America. It consists of a rolled sheet of yeast-leavened dough onto which a cinnamon and sugar mixture (and raisins or chopped grapes in some cases) is sprinkled over a thin coat of butter. The dough is then rolled, cut into individual portions, and baked. In North America, cinnamon rolls are frequently topped with icing (often confectioner’s sugar based) or glaze of some sort. In northern Europe, nib sugar is often used instead of icing.

 
In Sweden, the country of its presumed origin, the cinnamon roll takes the name of kanelbulle (literally: “cinnamon bun”) and October 4 has more recently started to be promoted as “kanelbullens dag” (Cinnamon roll day). A German variety originating in Hamburg and its surroundings is the Franzbrötchen.

 

The size of a cinnamon roll varies from place to place, but many vendors supply a smaller size about 5 centimetres (2.0 in) in diameter

A ‘loaf’ of raw cinnamon roll dough

and a larger size about 10 centimetres (3.9 in) to a side. The largest variety can be found in Finland, called Korvapuusti, where it can be up to 20 centimetres (7.9 in) in diameter and weighing 200 grams (7.1 oz).
The Finnish “Boston cake” is a “cake” made by baking cinnamon rolls in a round cake pan instead of baking them separately, so that they stick together to form a round cake.

 

A honey bun is a version of the cinnamon bun that is popular in the southeast United States. “A honey bun is a fried yeast pastry that contains honey and a swirl of cinnamon in the dough and is glazed with icing. According to legend, Howard Griffin of Griffin Pie Co. in Greensboro, North Carolina, developed the first honey bun in 1954. Flowers Foods acquired Griffin Pie Co. in 1983. Although the Greensboro bakery is now closed, honey buns remain a best-seller for Flowers.” Unlike cinnamon buns, which are generally the product of bakeries, honey buns are common convenience store and vending machine fare. Normally sold individually wrapped, alone or in boxes of 6 or more, they are a popular grab-and-go breakfast, eaten cold or heated in a microwave oven.
Honey buns are often an important food item for American jails and prisons. Because few prison and jail food items have high amounts of flavor and sugar, and because alcohol is not permitted in the prison gates, honey buns are one of the few legal delicacies present in American prisons. Some prisoners come to jails and prisons as addicts, and they become addicted to honey buns since they are unable to consume previous substances that they were addicted to.

One of America’s Favorite – Pie

April 23, 2012 at 8:23 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, Food | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A pie is a baked dish which is usually made of a pastry dough casing that covers or completely contains a filling of various sweet or

A slice of an apple pie

savoury ingredients.

Pies are defined by their crusts. A filled pie (also single-crust or bottom-crust), has pastry lining the baking dish, and the filling is placed on top of the pastry, but left open. A top-crust pie, which may also be called a cobbler, has the filling in the bottom of the dish and the filling covered with a pastry or other covering before baking. A two-crust pie has the filling completely enclosed in the pastry shell. Flaky pastry is a typical kind of pastry used for pie crusts, but many things can be used, including baking powder biscuits, mashed potatoes, and crumbs.

Pies can be a variety of sizes, ranging from bite-size to ones designed for multiple servings.

The need for nutritious, easy-to-store, easy-to-carry, and long-lasting foods on long journeys, in particular at sea, was initially solved by taking live food along with a butcher or cook. However, this took up additional space on what were either horse-powered treks or small ships, reducing the time of travel before additional food was required. This resulted in early armies adopting the style of hunter-foraging.

The introduction of the baking of processed cereals including the creation of flour, provided a more reliable source of food. Egyptian sailors carried a flat brittle bread loaf of millet bread called dhourra cake, while the Romans had a biscuit called buccellum.

The first pies appeared around 9500 BC, in the Egyptian Neolithic period or New Stone Age, when the use of stone tools shaped by polishing or grinding became common, the domestication of plants and animals, the establishment of permanent villages, and the practice of crafts such as pottery and weaving. Early pies were in the form of galettes wrapping honey as a treat inside a cover of ground oats, wheat, rye or barley. These galettes developed into a form of early sweet pastry or desserts, evidence of which can be found on the tomb walls of the Pharaoh Ramesses II, who ruled from 1304 to 1237 BC, located in the Valley of the Kings. Sometime before 2000 BC, a recipe for chicken pie was written on a tablet in Sumer.

With the knowledge transferred to the Ancient Greeks, historians believe that the Greeks originated pie pastry. Then a flour-water paste (add fat, and it becomes pastry), wrapped around meat, served to: cook the meat; seal in the juices; and provide a lightweight sealed holder for long sea journeys. This transferred the knowledge to the Romans who, having conquered parts of Northern Europe and southern Spain were far more adept at using salt and spices to preserve and flavour their meat.

The 1st century Roman cookbook Apicius make various mention of various recipes which involve a pie case. By 160 BC, Roman statesman Marcus Porcius Cato (234-149 BC) who wrote De Agri Cultura, notes the recipe for the most popular pie/cake called Placenta. Also called libum by the Romans, it was more like a modern day cheesecake on a pastry base, often used as an offering to the gods. With the development of the Roman Empire and its efficient road transport, pie cooking spread throughout Europe.

Pies remained as a core staple of diet of traveling and working peoples in the colder northern European countries, with regional variations based on both the locally grown and available meats, as well as the locally farmed cereal crop. The Cornish pasty is an excellent adaptation of the pie to a working man’s daily food needs.

Medieval cooks were often restricted in cooking forms they were able to use, having restricted access to ovens due to their costs of construction and need for abundant supplies of fuel. Pies could be easily cooked over an open fire, while partnering with a baker allowed them to cook the filling inside their own locally defined casing. The earliest pie-like recipes refer to coffyns (the word actually used for a basket or box), with straight sealed sides and a top; open top pies were referred to as traps. This may also be the reason why early recipes focus on the filling over the surrounding case, with the partnership development leading to the use of reusable earthenware pie cases which reduced the use of expensive flour.

The first reference to “pyes” as food items appeared in England (in a Latin context) as early as the 12th century, but no unequivocal reference to the item with which the article is concerned is attested until the 14th century (Oxford English Dictionary sb pie).

A slice of pecan pie

Song birds at the time were a fine delicacy, and protected by Royal Law. At the coronation of eight-year old English King Henry VI (1422–1461) in 1429, “Partryche and Pecock enhackyll” pie was served, consisting of cooked peacock mounted in its skin on a peacock filled pie. Cooked birds were frequently placed by European royal cooks on top of a large pie to identify its contents, leading to its later adaptation in pre-Victorian times as a porcelain ornament to release of steam and identify a good pie.

The Pilgrim fathers and early settlers brought their pie recipes with them to America, adapting to the ingredients and techniques available to them in the New World. Their first pies were based on berries and fruits pointed out to them by the Native North Americans. Pies allowed colonial cooks to stretch ingredients and also used round shallow pans to literally “cut corners,” and create a regional variation of shallow pie.

Meat pies with fillings such as steak, cheese, steak and kidney, minced beef, or chicken and mushroom are popular in the United

Homemade meat pie with beef and vegetables.

Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand as take-away snacks. They are also served with chips as an alternative to fish and chips at British chip shops.

Pot pies with a flaky crust and bottom are also a popular American dish, typically with a filling of meat (particularly beef, chicken or turkey), gravy, and mixed vegetables (potatoes, carrots and peas). Frozen pot pies are often sold in individual serving size.

Fruit pies may be served with a scoop of ice cream, a style known in North America as pie à la mode. Many sweet pies are served this way. Apple pie is a traditional choice, though any pie with sweet fillings may be served à la mode. This combination, and possibly the name as well, is thought to have been popularized in the mid-1890s in the United States.

Coconut Custard Pie (Diabetic Friendly)

Serves: 8

Ingredients

Pastry for single-crust 9 inch pie
4 eggs
2 cups 2% milk
1 cup Equal® Spoonful or Granulated*
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup toasted flaked coconut
1 teaspoon coconut extract (optional)

* May substitute 24 packets Equal sweetener

Directions

Roll pastry on floured surface into circle 1 inch larger than inverted 9-inch pie plate. Ease pastry into plate; trim and flute edge. Set aside.
Beat eggs in large bowl about 5 minutes or until thick and lemon colored. Whisk in milk and remaining ingredients. Pour mixture into pastry shell.
Bake pie in preheated 375F oven 30 to 35 minutes or until sharp knife inserted halfway between center and edge of pie comes out clean. Cool on wire rack. Serve at room temperature, or refrigerate and serve chilled.

Nutritional Information (Per Serving)
Calories:    194
Protein:    6 g
Sodium:     301 mg
Cholesterol:    115 mg
Fat:     11 g
Carbohydrates:     19 g
Exchanges:     1/2 milk, 1/2 starch, 2 fat

http://www.diabeticgourmet.com/recipes/html/987.shtml

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. | The Pool Theme.
Entries and comments feeds.

FeedBack

Giving Back with Food

the migrant chef

Gourmet comfort food at home and away.

Clean Slate Food Blog by Jonathan Beam

Clean Slate is a Food Blog by Jonathan Beam. Featuring recipes, cooking tips, and restaurant reviews.

tylersculinary

Tylers culinary blog

The Best Is Yet To Cook: Russian and American Food

A Russian immigrant's journey through food

chili365

All Things Chili, Chili All Things

AnArtificialLondoner

Little journals focusing on travel, tourism and food. Enjoy.

Yummy Lummy

I cook, photograph and eat food with some restaurant reviews

handmade. homegrown. beautiful life

I grow and make whatever I can in the cleanest, most natural and beautiful ways

Wandering Dish

A fine WordPress.com site Great Travels & food

I eat cake for breakfast

Sweets, Eats and My Favorite Things

The Gourmand Traveller

A blog about food.

T as Tasty

About delicious food.

Vanerpaddel

Kayaks and things about paddling

Aromas and Flavors from my Kitchen

"Home is where the Hearth is"

Healthy Cravings

scrumptiously good

Fallen for Food

A Passion for Everything Homemade

AZVHV

Arizona Veterans Helping Veterans

Healthy Cravings

A blog devoted to a healthier way of life.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,060 other followers