Hungry Girl Burger King and Wendy’s Survival Guide!

December 6, 2013 at 9:56 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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Hungry Girl 1

A good one from the Hungry Girl web site, the Burger King and Wendy’s Survival Guide. So if your on the run and eating out check this out first. I love this web site! The web link is below.

 

 
Here’s EVERYTHING you need to know for guilt-free eating at BK… It’s our Burger King and Wendy’s Survival Guide!

 

 
http://www.hungry-girl.com/biteout/show/2700

 

http://www.hungry-girl.com/biteout/show/2762

December 3, 2013 at 2:24 PM | Posted in breakfast | Leave a comment
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Mom  Hamilton Beach Sandwich Maker 002

Well I received my newest kitchen gadget yesterday afternoon and tried it out today. Out of 5 stars I give this one a perfect 5 star rating! Makes a perfect breakfast sandwich, McDonalds you’ve been served! Love this thing, easy to use, makes perfect breakfast sandwiches, and easy to clean up. No more skillets and no Olive Oil or Canola Oils needed, just a little Pam Spray is all that’s needed.

 

My first attempt at a sandwich went perfect. I used a Healthy Choice Whole Grain English Muffin, 1 Medium Size Egg, 1 Slice of Canadian Bacon (Ham), and a spray of Pam Cooking Spray. Took a few minutes to warm up and then 5 minutes to heat the sandwich and done! Hot breakfast sandwich and it was only 190 calories and 13 net carbs! I’ll be getting alot of use out this purchase!

 

 

Mom  Hamilton Beach Sandwich Maker 004

 

 

 

Hamilton Beach Breakfast Sandwich MakerHamilton Beach
Forget the fast food drive-through. With the Hamilton Beach Breakfast Sandwich Maker, you can enjoy a hot, homemade breakfast sandwich in under 5 minutes. Simply place the ingredients inside, build the base of your sandwich in the bottom layer, place the egg on the cooking plate and close the lid. Slide the cooking plate out and your sandwich assembles itself. Open the lid and your hot breakfast sandwich is ready to eat. The included recipe book provides a variety of breakfast sandwich options, from the traditional egg, ham and cheese to the unique cheddar, apple, bacon and egg croissant sandwich.

 

 

*Ready in 5 minutes, cook delicious breakfast sandwiches in the comfort of your own home
*Use your own fresh ingredients, including eggs, cheese and much more
*Make sandwiches with English muffins, biscuits, small bagels and more
*All removable parts are dishwasher safe; surfaces are covered with durable, nonstick coating
*Quick and easy recipes included

One of America’s Favorites – Milkshakes

November 11, 2013 at 10:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A strawberry milkshake topped with whipped cream and strawberry syrup

A strawberry milkshake topped with whipped cream and strawberry syrup

A milkshake is a sweet, cold beverage which is usually made from milk, ice cream or iced milk, and flavorings or sweeteners such as fruit syrup or chocolate sauce. Outside the United States, the drink is sometimes called a thickshake or a thick milkshake or in New England, a frappe, to differentiate it from other less-viscous forms of flavored milk.
Full-service restaurants, soda fountains, and diners usually prepare and mix the shake “by hand” from scoops of ice cream and milk in a blender or drink mixer using a stainless steel cup. Many fast food outlets do not make shakes by hand with ice cream. Instead, they make shakes in automatic milkshake machines which freeze and serve a premade milkshake mixture consisting of milk, a sweetened flavoring agent, and a thickening agent. However, some fast food outlets still follow the traditional method, and some serve milkshakes which are prepared by blending soft-serve ice cream (or ice milk) with flavoring or syrups. A milkshake can also be made by adding powder into fresh milk, and stirring the powder into the milk. Milkshakes made in this way can come in a variety of flavors, including chocolate, strawberry and banana.

 

 
Hand-blended milkshakes can be made from any flavor of ice cream, and additional flavorings, such as chocolate syrup and/or malt syrup or malt powder, can be added prior to mixing. This allows a greater variety than is available in machine-made shakes. Some unusual milkshake recipes exclude ice cream.
Milkshake-like recipes which use yogurt, crushed ice, and fresh fruit and which are made without ice cream are usually called smoothies. When malted milk is added, a milkshake is called a malted milkshake, a malt shake (or maltshake), a malted, or simply a malt. Milkshakes are also called thick milkshakes in the United Kingdom, a frappe (pronounced “frap”) in parts of New England and Canada. In Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts, coffee syrup or coffee-flavored ice cream is used to make the local “coffee frappe” shake. Milkshakes with added fruit called batido are popular in Latin America and in Miami’s Cuban expatriate community. In Nicaragua, milkshakes are called leche malteada.
Some U.S. restaurants serve milkshakes with crumbled cookies, candy bar pieces, or alcoholic beverages. The grasshopper milkshake, for example, includes crumbled chocolate cookies, creme de menthe liqueur, and chocolate mint ice cream.

 

A soda jerker throws a scoop of ice cream into a steel mixing cup while making a milkshake

A soda jerker throws a scoop of ice cream into a steel mixing cup while making a milkshake

 
Restaurants with the highest volume of traffic, such as McDonald’s, often opt to use pre-made milkshake mixtures that are prepared in automatic milkshake machines. These machines are stainless steel cylinders with beaters that use refrigeration coils to freeze pre-made milkshake mixtures into a drinkable texture. The number of different flavors that restaurants with automatic milkshake machines can serve is limited by the number of different tanks in their milkshake machines, and fast food restaurants usually offer fewer flavors of milkshakes.
The smallest automatic milkshake machines are counter-mounted appliances that can make a single milkshake flavor using a five liter stainless steel tank. Large restaurants that wish to offer multiple flavors can either use floor-mounted multi-flavor machines with multiple five liter stainless steel barrels or use carbon dioxide-based machines that mix the flavors during dispensing. Some fast-food restaurants use “thick milkshake” machines, which are single-flavor machines with a (12 liter) stainless steel tank.

 

 
Some fast-food restaurants such as Dairy Queen serve milkshakes which are prepared by blending soft-serve ice cream (or ice milk) with sweetened, flavored syrups such as chocolate syrup and fruit-flavored syrup and milk.

 

 
Pre-made milkshakes are sold in grocery stores in North America and the UK. These drinks are made from milk mixed with sweetened flavored powder, artificial syrup or concentrate, which would otherwise be called “flavored milk”, thickened with carrageenan or other products. Bottled milkshakes are usually sold in 330ml, 500ml or 1 liter bottles.

 

 
When the term “milkshake” was first used in print in 1885, milkshakes were an alcoholic whiskey drink that has been described as a “sturdy, healthful eggnog type of drink, with eggs, whiskey, etc., served as a tonic as well as a treat”. However, by 1900, the term referred to “wholesome drinks made with chocolate, strawberry, or vanilla syrups.” By the “early 1900s people were asking for the new treat, often with ice cream.” By the 1930s, milkshakes were a popular drink at malt shops, which were the “typical soda fountain of the period… used by students as a meeting place or hangout.”
The history of the electric blender, malted milk drinks and milkshakes are interconnected. Before the widespread availability of electric blenders, milkshake-type drinks were more like eggnog, or they were a hand-shaken mixture of crushed ice and milk, sugar, and flavorings. Hamilton Beach’s drink mixers began being used at soda fountains in 1911 and the electric blender or drink mixer was invented by Steven Poplawski in 1922. With the invention of the blender, milkshakes began to take their modern, whipped, aerated, and frothy form. Malted milk drinks are made with malted milk powder, which contains dried milk, malted barley and wheat flour. Malted milk powder was invented in 1897 by William Horlick as an easily digested restorative health drink for disabled people and children, and as an infant’s food.
The use of malted milk powder in milkshakes was popularized in the USA by the Chicago drugstore chain Walgreens. In 1922, Walgreens’ employee Ivar “Pop” Coulson made a milkshake by adding two scoops of vanilla ice cream to the standard malted milk drink recipe (milk, chocolate syrup and malt powder). This item, under the name “Horlick’s Malted Milk,” was featured by the Walgreen drugstore chain as part of a chocolate milk shake, which itself became known as a “malted” or “malt” and became one of the most popular soda-fountain drinks.
The automation of milkshakes developed in the 1930s, after the invention of freon-cooled refrigerators provided a safe, reliable way of automatically making and dispensing ice cream. In 1936, inventor Earl Prince used the basic concept behind the freon-cooled automated ice cream machine to develop the Multimixer, a “five-spindled mixer that could produce five milkshakes at once, all automatically, and dispense them at the pull of a lever into awaiting paper cups.”
In the late 1930s, several newspaper articles show that the term “frosted” was used to refer to milkshakes made with ice cream. In 1937, the Denton Journal in Maryland stated that “For a ‘frosted’ shake, add a dash of your favorite ice cream.” In 1939, the Mansfield News in Ohio stated that “A frosted beverage, in the vernacular, is something good to which ice cream has been added. Example par excellence is frosted coffee—that hot, tasty beverage made chilly with ice and frosty with ice cream.”

 

 
By the 1950s, popular places to drink milkshakes were Woolworth’s “5 & 10″ lunch counters, diners, burger joints, and drugstore soda fountains. These establishments often prominently displayed a shining chrome or stainless steel milkshake mixing machine.
These establishments made milkshakes in Hamilton Beach or similar styles of drink mixers, which had spindles and agitators that folded air into the drinks for “smooth, fluffy results” and served them in 12½-ounce tall, “y”-shaped glasses. Soda fountain staff had their own jargon, such as “Burn One All the Way” (chocolate malted with chocolate ice cream), “Twist It, Choke It, and Make It Cackle” (chocolate malted with an egg) “Shake One in the Hay” (a strawberry shake) and a “White Cow” (a vanilla milkshake). In the 1950s, a milkshake machine salesman named Ray Kroc bought exclusive rights to the 1930s-era Multimixer milkshake maker from inventor Earl Prince, and went on to use automated milkshake machines to speed up production at McDonald’s restaurants.

 

 
In the 1950s, milkshakes were called “frappes”, “velvets,” “frosted [drinks]“, or “cabinets” in different parts of the U.S. A specialty style of milkshake, the “concrete,” was “…a milk shake so thick that the server hands it out the order window upside down, demonstrating that not a drop will drip.” In 1952, the Newport Daily News in Rhode Island contained a “Guide For Top Quality ICE CREAM SODAS CABINETS MILK SHAKES”, which shows the use of the term “cabinet” in print. An article from 1953 in the Salisbury Times (in the state of Maryland) suggests that shakes can be made in a jar by shaking well. The article states that by adding four large tablespoons of ice cream, the drink becomes a “frosted shake.” Currently, in New England, and especially the Greater Boston area, the ice-cream and milk dessert known as a “milkshake” in other parts of the country is referred to as a “frappe”. In these locales, “milkshake” refers to a lighter drink, usually made of shaken or blended milk with flavoring of some sort. The term “milkshake,” however, is widely used in Connecticut.

 

 

This milkshake was made using liquid nitrogen. Vapor can still be seen drifting from the top.

This milkshake was made using liquid nitrogen. Vapor can still be seen drifting from the top.

In 2005, the traditional home of the milkshake, the family restaurants and 24-hour diner-style restaurants that were the “staples of 1950s and 60s America such as Denny’s, Big Boy and the International House of Pancakes” were supplanted “…in terms of revenue for the first time since the U.S. census started measuring this in the 1970s. The shift means the burger, fries and milkshake ideal evoked by the sitcom Happy Days is losing its hold on the American appetite.” Instead, U.S. consumers are going out to casual dining restaurants.
In 2006, the U.S. Agricultural Research Service developed reduced-sugar, low-fat milk shakes for lunch programs. The shakes have half the sugar and only 10% of the fat of commercial fast-food shakes. Schools need a milk shake machine or soft-serve ice cream machine to serve the milkshakes. The milkshakes also have added fiber and other nutrients, and they have much less lactose, which makes the shakes appropriate for some lactose intolerant people.
The U.S. sales of milkshakes, malts and floats rose 11% in 2006, according to the industry research firm NPD Group. Christopher Muller, the director of the Center for Multi-Unit Restaurant Management at Orlando’s University of Central Florida states that “milkshakes remind us of summer, youth — and indulgence”, and “they’re evocative of a time gone by”. Muller states that milkshakes are an “enormously profitable” item for restaurants, since the fluffy drinks contain so much air. The market research firm Technomic claims that about 75% of the average-priced $3.38 restaurant shake in 2006 was profit. An executive from Sonic Drive-In, a U.S. chain of 1950s-style diner restaurants, calls shakes “…one of our highest-volume, revenue-producing areas”.
Part of the increase in milkshake sales reported in 2006 may be due to the increasing availability of innovative chef-designed milkshakes in high-end restaurants. In 2006, the Los Angeles Times reported that chefs from “hipster hangouts and retro landmarks” are using “macerated farmers market strawberries, Valrhona chocolate and Madagascar Bourbon vanilla” to make new milkshake flavors.
Other novel ideas offered in LA-area restaurants include milkshakes made with toasted pecans, saffron-rose water or orange-blossom ice cream, taro root, vanilla beans steeped in rum, Valrhona chocolate and Grey Goose vodka, and vanilla custard mixed with Russian Imperial stout.

 

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 27, 2013 at 9:51 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 1 Comment
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Can’t get the ketchup out of a stubborn bottle? Just stick a straw inside. Now when you turn it upside-down , the airflow through the straw will make the ketchup flow right out.

The Taste Test of Two New Items!

October 5, 2013 at 2:06 PM | Posted in Food | 2 Comments
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I’ve been seeing the commercials advertising the new McDonald’s Mighty Wings and Arby’s Smokehouse Brisket Sandwich and both looked soooo good I had to sample them! So for lunch today my Mom and Dad wanted to try them so I went out and bought Mom the Arby’s Smokehouse Brisket Sandwich and Dad the McDonald’s Mighty Wings, and I got a small sample of both.

 

Arbys Smoke House McDs Wings 002

Start with the McDonald’s Mighty Wings; McD’s got their self a winner with these wings! Nice breading and a great spicy taste. The wings were nice size and very meaty and you have a choice of a variety of dipping sauces.

 

Nutritional Info – McDonald’s Mighty Wings – 3-piece – 3.3 oz (94g)
Calories – 290 (from Fat – 170)
Fat – 19g (Saturated Fat – 4g)
Sodium – 870mg
Carbs – 12g (Sugar – 0g)
Protein – 18g

 

 

Arbys Smoke House McDs Wings 004

Next the Arby’s Smokehouse Brisket Sandwich; and another winner! Not only does this one look mouth-watering on TV but looks even better when buy one. The brisket is smoked for 13 hours making it nice and tender. Arby’s Smokehouse Brisket is piled high with slow-smoked beef brisket, topped with smoked Gouda cheese, crispy onions, BBQ sauce and mayo, and served on a toasted, bakery-style bun. I couldn’t believe how good it was! It was tender and went great with the BBQ sauce and Gouda which just melted in your mouth, and I love Gouda Cheese! But the bad part about it is the calories and carbs. It’s high in both with 610 calories and 42 carbs. It is one good sandwich though.

 

Nutritional Info – Arby’s Smokehouse Brisket sandwich (203g)
Calories – 610 (from Fat – 320)
Fat – 35g (Saturated Fat – 12g)
Sodium – 1230mg
Carbs – 42g (Sugar – 7g)
Protein – 35g

 

 

So both new items I sampled were winners!

Burger King adding low-fat French fries, ‘Satisfries’

September 26, 2013 at 7:57 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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Burger King

Burger King Worldwide Inc. said it has developed French fries containing 40 percent less fat and 30 percent fewer calories than those sold by its arch rival McDonald’s Corp. The new crinkle-cut fries, to be called Satisfries, will contain 190 calories, 8 grams of fat, and 210 milligrams of sodium for a “value-size” serving.
“One out of every two Burger King guests orders our classic French fries and we know our guests are hungry for options that are better for them,” said Burger King President of North America, Alex Macedo.

The chain made the claims about lower-fat and lower-calorie fries, which come as consumer groups in the United States increase pressure on the food industry to offer healthier alternatives, on its website late Monday.

 

Fast food chains have come under fire from health groups for contributing to an obesity problem in the U.S. by selling high-fat content food. About two-thirds of adults in this country are overweight and one-third are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in a report published in May. Rising obesity leads to higher medical costs and risks of disease like diabetes and heart-disease.
Other popular fast food chains have also been trying to get rid of their junk-food tag, with McDonald’s offering an under-400-calories menu, while Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. introduced a DD Smart menu. Yum! Brands Inc.’s KFC is also trying to make kids’ meals healthier offering grilled chicken, applesauce and green beans.
Burger King, home of the Whopper, said the difference between Satisfries and its classic French fries is that less oil is absorbed in the cooking process.

Top Fast-Food Picks for People with Diabetes

September 5, 2013 at 7:42 AM | Posted in diabetes, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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If you have to eat fast food Diabetic Living On Line helps out by giving the healthiest selections from different restaurants. I left the link at the bottom of the page to get all the tips.

 

 
Top Fast-Food Picks for People with DiabetesDiabetic living logo
Fast food is not off-limits for people with diabetes, but knowing what to order makes all the difference. Check out our top picks for healthier eating at fast-food restaurants.

By Diabetic Living Editors, 2013
Our Top Fast-Food Picks
Sometimes you can’t beat the convenience and price of a drive-through meal. Here are some fast-food options that won’t derail your goals.

 

Best Bites at Burger Joints
At burger joints, the calories, fat, and sodium add up quickly. Search nutrition information online to find options with fewer than 400 calories, 20 grams of fat, and 800 milligrams of sodium per serving.

 
Wendy’s
Go for a healthful yet filling salad. This half-size order of Apple Pecan Chicken Salad at Wendy’s is served with pomegranate dressing and pecans. To drink, choose unsweetened iced tea.

Nutrition Facts: 340 cal., 18 g total fat (4.5 g sat. fat), 60 mg chol., 700 mg sodium, 29 g carb. (4 g fiber, 22 g sugars), 19 g pro….

 

* Click the link below to see all the Top Fast-Food Picks for People with Diabetes *

 
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/dining-out/top-fast-food-picks-people-diabetes/?sssdmh=dm17.688334&esrc=nwdlo082713

Hungry Girl: It’s our Burger King Survival Guide!

August 16, 2013 at 9:15 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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A very good guide from the Hungry Girl web site, http://www.hungry-girl.com/    The article link is at the bottom of the post.

 

Here’s EVERYTHING you need to know for guilt-free eating at BK… It’s our Burger King Survival Guide!

 

 

Breakfast Bites

Quaker Oatmeal
1 order: 140 – 270 calories, 3.5 – 4g fat, 100 – 290mg sodium, 23 – 55g carbs, 3 – 5g fiber, 1 – 29g sugars, 5g protein — PointsPlus® value 4 – 7*

This hearty hot stuff comes in three varieties: Original, Maple and Brown Sugar Flavor, and Fruit Topped Maple Flavor. Options ROCK! The fruity offering includes 100 calories’ worth of dried cranberries, raisins, cherries, and blueberries.

Egg & Cheese Muffin Sandwich
1 sandwich: 220 calories, 9g fat, 650mg sodium, 22g carbs, 1g fiber, 2g sugars, 12g protein — PointsPlus® value 6*…….

 

 

Read the entire article by clicking the link below.

http://www.hungry-girl.com/biteout/show/2700

Home Made McMuffin

July 17, 2013 at 9:20 AM | Posted in Eggs, green tea, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Started the day off the right way! Rolled out to get paper this morning and the humidity had already started. Came back in and preparedEgg Ham Swiss McMuffinn 005 a Homemade Ham, Swiss, and Egg McMuffin. I used 1 Egg, that I scrambled and seasoned with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper along with a couple of shakes of Frank’s Red Hot Sauce. I also used 3 slices of Kroger Private Selection Oven Roasted Rosemary Ham, 1 slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese, and served it all on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Muffin. The Muffin has 80 calories and 17 carbs. I also had a cup of fresh brewed Biggilo Green Tea. I was set to start the day off right with the Morning Journal Paper, fresh Brewed Green Tea, and a lean and healthy Egg, Ham, and Cheese McMuffin. How did your morning go?

The Golden Arches got me this morning…

May 17, 2013 at 9:14 AM | Posted in breakfast | Leave a comment
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I had purchased some JTM Hogies to grill for dinner tonight but forgot to pick up a bag of Aunt Millie’s Whole Grain Mini Sub Buns. Friday’s are always busy at local Walmarts and sometimes real tough to get an electric cart, and if your handicapped and rely on the carts to get around you go early. So I went early this morning, around 7:00 and grabbed a package of the buns and some milk. After that I’m on my way home and it happened my car was pulled into the parking lot of the Golden Arches, McDonald’s! I haven’t had a Breakfast Sandwich or anything else from McD’s in at least 5 – 7 years. But in a moment of weakness and convenience I had a Sausage McMuffin. I’m not going to lie the sandwich never stood a chance! I inhaled it and it was delicious. It may not be another 5 – 7 years before I have another!

 

 

 

McDonald’s
Sausage McMuffinmcdonalds-Sausage-McMuffin

 

Wake up to a freshly toasted English muffin made with eight grams of whole grain, topped with savory sausage hot off the griddle and a slice of melty American cheese

Sausage McMuffin
(Daily Value)
Calories 370
Total Fat 22g 34%
Carbs 31g 10%
Protein 15g
Sodium 820mg 34%

 

http://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en/food/product_nutrition.breakfast.261.sausage-mcmuffin.html

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