Jennie – O Turkey Recipe ofthe Week – Apple Carrot Cupcakes

October 10, 2014 at 5:17 AM | Posted in dessert, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week doesn’t have Turkey in it but it does have some other delicious ingredients, Apple Carrot Cupcakes. Cake Mix, Cream Cheese, Cinnamon Apples, and Pecans, easy and simple recipe. And it’s from the Jennie – O Turkey website! http://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Apple Carrot Cupcakes

Apple Carrot Cupcakes
Moist carrot cake infused with applesauce and topped with cream cheese frosting.
Ingredients
1 (21.41-ounce) package carrot cake mix
1 (16-ounce) container cream cheese frosting
½ cup HORMEL® COUNTRY CROCK® cinnamon apples
½ cup chopped pecans, toasted

 
Directions
Heat oven to 350°F. Line 24 muffin cups with paper liners. Prepare cake mix according to package directions. Fill muffin cups with batter.

Bake according to package directions. Cool. Frost tops with cream cheese frosting. Place apple sliced on frosting. Sprinkle tops with chopped pecans.

 

Nutritional Information
Calories 190 Fat 5g
Protein 1g Cholesterol 0mg
Carbohydrates 36g Sodium 240mg
Fiber 0g Saturated Fat 1g
Sugars 13g

 
http://www.jennieo.com/recipes/882-Apple-Carrot-Cupcakes

One of America’s Favorites – Gooey Butter Cake

September 29, 2014 at 6:34 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A slice of Gooey butter cake, garnished with powdered sugar and raspberries.

A slice of Gooey butter cake, garnished with powdered sugar and raspberries.

Gooey butter cake is a type of cake traditionally made in the American Midwest city of St. Louis. Gooey butter cake is a flat and dense cake made with wheat cake flour, butter, sugar, and eggs, typically near an inch tall, and dusted with powdered sugar. While sweet and rich, it is somewhat firm, and is able to be cut into pieces similarly to a brownie. Gooey butter cake is generally served as a type of coffee cake and not as a formal dessert cake. There are two distinct variants of the gooey butter: a bakers’ gooey butter and a cream cheese and commercial yellow cake mix variant. It is believed to have originated in the 1930s.

The St. Louis Convention & Visitors Commission includes a recipe for the cake on its website, calling it “one of St. Louis’ popular, quirky foods”; the recipe calls for a bottom layer of butter and yellow cake batter, and a top layer made from eggs, cream cheese, and, in one case, almond extract. The cake is dusted with confectioner’s sugar before being served. The cake is best eaten soon after baking it. It should be served at room temperature or warm.

The cream cheese variant of the gooey butter cake recipe, while close enough to the original, is an approximation designed for easier preparation at home. Almost all bakeries in the greater St. Louis area, including those at local grocery chains Schnucks and Dierbergs, use a slightly different recipe based on corn syrup, sugar and powdered eggs—no cake mix or cream cheese is involved.

 

 
A legend about the cake’s origin is included in Saint Louis Days…Saint Louis Nights (ISBN 0-9638298-1-5), a cookbook published in the mid-1990s by the Junior League of St. Louis. The cake was supposedly first made by accident in the 1930s by a St. Louis-area German American baker who was trying to make regular cake batter but reversed the proportions of butter[3] and flour.

John Hoffman was the owner of the bakery where the mistake was made. The real story is there are two types of butter “smears” used in a bakery: a gooey butter and a deep butter. The deep butter was used for deep butter coffee cakes. The gooey butter was used as an adhesive for things like Danish rolls and stollens. The gooey butter was smeared across the surface, then the item was placed in coconut, hazelnuts, peanuts, crumbs or whatever was desired so they would stick to the product.

Hoffman hired a new baker that was supposed to make deep butter cakes, but got the two butter smears mixed up. The mistake wasn’t caught until after the cakes came out of the proof box. Rather than throw them away, Hoffman went ahead and baked them up. As this was around the Great Depression that was another reason to be thrifty. The new type of cake sold so well, Hoffman kept producing them and soon, so did the other bakers around St. Louis.

Another St. Louis baker, Fred Heimburger, also remembers the cake coming on the scene in the 1930s, as a slip up that became a popular hit and local acquired taste. He liked it well enough that Mr. Heimburger tried to promote Gooey butter cake by taking samples of it with him when he traveled out of St. Louis to visit other bakers in their shops. They liked it all right, but they couldn’t get their customers to buy it, with reactions tending to regard it as looking too much like a mistake, and “a flat gooey mess”. And so it remained as a regional favorite for many decades.

 

 
Many St. Louis area grocery stores sell fresh or boxed gooey butter cakes. Haas baking sells a widely distributed, square and packaged version in a box that depicts a colorful, if anachronistic scene of aviator Charles Lindbergh’s plane the Spirit of St. Louis flying past downtown St. Louis, the Gateway Arch and the modern cityscape in clouds. Independent or family bakeries make gooey butter cakes, from a time when there were still many neighborhood corner German and Austrian American bakeries in St. Louis, in neighborhoods like Dutchtown, Bevo Mill, and the Tower Grove area, and others. There are now several businesses that specialize in different flavors of gooey butter cake and sell them in coffee shops, or to walk in customers, or by order or shipment.

Panera Bread Company (original name: St. Louis Bread Company) makes a Danish with a gooey butter filling for the St. Louis market. More recently, Walgreens sells wrapped, individual slices of a version of St. Louis gooey butter cake as a snack alongside muffins, brownies, and cookies.

Gooey butter cake is now widely available outside of the St. Louis area, as Walmart has been marketing a version that it calls Paula Deen Baked Goods Original Gooey Butter Cake. However, Walmart calls it “Paula’s signature dessert” and makes no mention of its St. Louis origin.

Modern versions of this confection, originally sold as a breakfast pastry or “coffee cake”, have shown up on upscale restaurant menus across the Midwest and even the West coast. The first such interpretation is believed to have happened in 1991 at a small fine dining restaurant located in Springfield, Missouri. The restaurant, called Clary’s after the surname of the two brothers who originally opened it, offered their customers a blueberry version of the gooey butter cake with vanilla bean ice cream and blueberry sauce. The dessert was originally called Gary’s Favorite after Gary Tombridge, a friend of co-owner James Clary, served the chef a raspberry flavored gooey butter cake after dinner at Tombridge’s home. The chef remarked what a wonderful pastry it was and wondered why no one had ever served it as a dessert. The dessert, along with Clary’s signature souffles, became a staple at the eatery. Clary left the restaurant business in 2008 but says he still serves the gooey butter cake to friends and catering clients. The sweet dessert can now be found on many restaurant menus including the popular Kansas City chain Ya Ya’s, Murray’s in Columbia, Missouri, and even as far as Seattle, where The Five Spot serves a pumpkin version of the classic pastry.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cream Cheese

July 7, 2014 at 5:43 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Cream Cheese

Cream Cheese

Cream cheese is a soft, mild-tasting cheese with a high fat content. Stabilizers such as carob bean gum and carrageenan are added.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines the dairy product as containing at least 33% milk fat (as marketed) with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9. In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content.

Cream cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, and so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie and Neufchâtel. It is more comparable in taste, texture and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone.

 

 

 
Early prototypes of cream cheese were referenced in England as early as 1583 and in France as early as 1651. Recipes are recorded soon after 1754, particularly from Lincolnshire and the southwest of England.

 

 

 
In the United States – Recipes for the making of cream cheese can be found in US cookbooks and newspapers beginning in the mid-eighteenth century. By the second decade of the 19th century, Philadelphia and its environs had gained a reputation for this cheese. The cheese, however, was produced on family farms and so quantities for distribution were small. Around 1873, William A. Lawrence, a Chester, NY, dairyman, was the first to mass-produce cream cheese. In 1873 he purchased a Neufchatel factory and shortly thereafter, by adding cream to the process, was able to create a richer cheese, that he called “cream cheese”. In 1877 he created the first brand for cream cheese: the silhouette of a cow followed by the words: Neufchatel & Cream Cheese. In 1879, in order to create a larger factory, Lawrence partnered with a Chester merchant, Samuel S Durland. In 1880, Alvah L Reynolds, a New York cheese distributor, began to sell the cheese of Lawrence & Durland and created a brand name for it: Philadelphia Cream Cheese. Reynolds chose the name based on the reputation Philadelphia had for such cheese. By the end of 1880, faced with increasing demand for his Philadelphia brand, Reynolds turned to Charles Green, a second Chester dairyman, who, by 1880, had been manufacturing cream cheese. Some of Green’s cheese was, now, also sold under the Philadelphia label. In 1892, Reynolds bought the Empire Cheese Co. of South Edmeston, NY to produce cheese under his Philadelphia label.

 

When that burned down in 1900, he turned, the following year, to the newly formed Phenix Cheese Co. to produce his cheese. In 1903, Reynolds sold the rights to his Philadelphia brand to Phenix (which merged with Kraft in 1928). By the early 1880s, in addition to Philadelphia brand, was Star, a second cream cheese brand of Lawrence & Durland, and Green’s World and Globe brands. At the turn of the 19th century, New York dairymen were producing cream cheese for a number of other brands: Double Cream (C. Percival); Eagle (F.X. Baumert); Empire (Phenix Cheese Co.); Mohican (International Cheese Co.); Monroe Cheese Co. (Gross & Hoffman); and Nabob (F.H. Legget).

 

 

 

Cream cheese on a bagel

Cream cheese on a bagel

Cream cheese is often spread on bread, bagels, crackers, etc., and used as a dip for potato chips and similar snack items, and in salads. It can be mixed with other ingredients to make spreads, such as yogurt-cream spread (1.25 parts cream cheese, 1 part yogurt, whipped).

Cream cheese can be used for many purposes in sweet and savoury cookery, and is in the same family of ingredients as other milk products, such as cream, milk, butter, and yogurt. It can be used in cooking to make cheesecake and to thicken sauces and make them creamy. Cream cheese is sometimes used in place of or with butter (typically two parts cream cheese to one part butter) when making cakes or cookies, and cream cheese frosting. It is the main ingredient in crab rangoon, an appetizer commonly served at US Chinese restaurants. It can also be used instead of butter or olive oil in mashed potatoes. It is also commonly used in some western-style sushi rolls.

American cream cheese tends to have lower fat content than elsewhere, but “Philadelphia” branded cheese is sometimes suggested as a substitute for petit suisse.

 

 

 
Cream cheese is easy to make at home, and many methods and recipes are used. Consistent, reliable, commercial manufacture is more difficult. Normally, protein molecules in milk have a negative surface charge, which keeps milk in a liquid state; the molecules act as surfactants, forming micelles around the particles of fat and keeping them in emulsion. Lactic acid bacteria are added to pasteurized and homogenized milk. During the fermentation at around 22 °C (72 °F),[citation needed] the pH of the milk decreases (it becomes more acidic). Amino acids at the surface of the proteins begin losing charge and become neutral, turning the fat micelles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic state and causing the liquid to coagulate. If the bacteria are left in the milk too long, the pH lowers further, the micelles attain a positive charge and the mixture returns to liquid form. The key, then, is to kill the bacteria by heating the mixture to 52–63 °C (126–145 °F)[citation needed] at the moment the cheese is at the isoelectric point, meaning the state at which half the ionizable surface amino acids of the proteins are positively charged and half are negative.

Inaccurate timing of the heating can produce inferior or unsalable cheese due to variations in flavor and texture. Cream cheese has a higher fat content than other cheeses, and fat repels water, which tends to separate from the cheese; this can be avoided in commercial production by adding stabilizers such as guar or carob gums to prolong its shelf life.

In Spain and Mexico, cream cheese is sometimes called by the generic name queso filadelfia, following the marketing of Philadelphia branded cream cheese by Kraft Foods.

 

Seafood of the Week – Crab Rangoon

June 24, 2014 at 5:39 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | 2 Comments
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Crab rangoon

Crab rangoon

Crab rangoon are deep-fried dumpling appetizers served in American Chinese and, more recently, Thai restaurants, stuffed with a combination of cream cheese, lightly flaked crab meat (more commonly, canned crab meat or imitation crab meat), with scallions, and/or garlic. These fillings are then wrapped in Chinese wonton wrappers in a triangular or flower shape, then deep fried in vegetable oil.

 

 

 
Crab rangoon has been on the menu of the “Polynesian-style” restaurant Trader Vic’s in San Francisco since at least 1956. Although the appetizer is allegedly derived from an authentic Burmese recipe, the dish was probably invented in the United States. A “Rangoon crab a la Jack” was mentioned as a dish at a Hawaiian-style party in 1952, but without further detail, and so may or may not be the same thing.

Though the history of crab rangoon is unclear, cream cheese, like other cheese, is essentially nonexistent in Southeast Asian and Chinese cuisine, so it is unlikely that the dish is actually of east or southeast Asian origin. In North America, crab rangoon is served often with soy sauce, plum sauce, duck sauce, sweet and sour sauce, or mustard for dipping.

 

 

 
In the Pacific Northwest states of America crab rangoon are also known as crab puffs, although this primarily refers to versions that use puff pastry as a wrapper instead of wonton. They may also be referred to as crab pillows, crab cheese wontons, or cheese wontons.

 

Seafood of the Week – Lox

May 6, 2014 at 5:29 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | 1 Comment
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Lox on bagel

Lox on bagel

 

Lox is a fillet of brined salmon. Traditionally, lox is served on a bagel with cream cheese, and is usually garnished with tomato, sliced red onion, and sometimes capers, which diners may or may not opt to add to the bagel. Some American preparations of scrambled eggs or frittata include a mince of lox and onion.

 

 

 

Lox and cream cheese sandwich

Lox and cream cheese sandwich

* Nova or Nova Scotia salmon, sometimes called Nova lox, is cured with a milder brine and then cold-smoked. The name dates from a time when much of the salmon in New York City came from Nova Scotia. Today, however, the name refers to the milder brining, as compared to regular lox (or belly lox), and the fish may come from other waters or even be raised on farms.
* Scotch or Scottish-style salmon. A mixture of salt and sometimes sugars, spices, and other flavorings is applied directly to the meat of the fish; this is called “dry-brining” or “Scottish-style.” The brine mixture is then rinsed off, and the fish is cold-smoked.
* Nordic-style smoked salmon. The fish is salt-cured and cold-smoked.
* Gravad lax or gravlax. This is a traditional Nordic means of preparing salmon. The salmon is coated with a spice mixture, which often includes dill, sugars, salt, and spices like juniper berry. It is often served with a sweet mustard-dill sauce.
Other similar brined and smoked fish products are also popular in delis and fish stores, particularly in Chicago & the New York City boroughs, such as chubs, Sable (smoked cod), smoked sturgeon, smoked whitefish, and kippered herring.

 

 

Pumpkin Roll

September 19, 2013 at 9:33 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Splenda | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Carol for passing along this Fall Diabetic Friendly Dessert!

 

Pumpkin Roll

Cake (Roll):

3 large eggs or 3/4 cup of Egg Beater‘s (Equal of 3 Eggs)
1/2 cup Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking
1 tablespoon Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking
1 cup canned pumpkin
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 cup self-rising flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 cup pecans, finely chopped

Filling:

4 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese, softened
1 1/2 to 2 cups light whipped topping, thawed, if frozen
1 tbs Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking

 

* Note – I haven’t tried this yet but the Pecans should work as part of the filling instead of the Roll if you prefer.

 

Directions:

For Cake: Beat eggs (or Egg Beater’s) and 1/2 cup Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking for 5 minutes in mixing bowl on medium speed of mixer.
Stir in 1 cup pecans (finely chopped), pumpkin, and lemon juice. Blend in flour, cinnamon and nutmeg until well combined.
Line a jelly roll pan with waxed paper. Spread batter evenly in pan. Bake in preheated 350°F oven 5 to 8 minutes or until woodenpick comes out clean. Cool 3 minutes in pan; turn out onto a cloth and roll up from the narrow end.
Chill in refrigerator until completely cool.
For Filling: Beat cream cheese, whipped topping and 1 tablespoon Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking in mixing bowl on medium speed of mixer until smooth and spreadable.
Unroll pumpkin roll and spread with filling. Re-roll. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Slice cake into pinwheels.
Makes 8 servings.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 15, 2013 at 7:57 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When baking a recipe that calls for cream cheese, be sure it’s at room temperature before you start, and make sure you beat it so it’s light and fluffy before adding any other ingredients, especially eggs.

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

May 28, 2013 at 9:18 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 1 Comment
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Hint #1 – Always bring cheese to room temperature one hour before serving it. Even if the cheese becomes a little melty, the flavor will be much better.

 

 

Hint #2 – To keep meat or cheese meat hors d’ oeuvres moist, cover them with a damp paper towel, then cover them loosely with plastic wrap. Many fillings (as well as bread) dry out very quickly, but with this tip, you make these simple appetizers first and have them on the table when guests arrive.

Sausage Stuffed Jalapenos

May 6, 2013 at 7:37 AM | Posted in cooking | 1 Comment
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Sausage Stuffed Jalapenos

 
INGREDIENTS:Stuffed Japs
1 pound ground pork sausage
1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese,
softened
1 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
1 pound large fresh jalapeno peppers,
halved lengthwise and seeded
1 (8 ounce) bottle Ranch dressing
(optional)
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C).
2. Place sausage in a skillet over medium heat, and cook until evenly brown. Drain grease.
3. In a bowl, mix the sausage, cream cheese, and Parmesan cheese. Spoon about 1 tablespoon sausage mixture into each jalapeno half. Arrange stuffed halves in baking dishes.
4. Bake 20 minutes in the preheated oven, until bubbly and lightly browned. Serve with Ranch dressing.

 
Nutrition
Information
Servings Per Recipe: 12
Calories: 369
Amount Per Serving
Total Fat: 34.8g
Cholesterol: 59mg
Sodium: 627mg
Amount Per Serving
Total Carbs: 4.3g
Dietary Fiber: 1.1g
Protein: 9.8g

PHILADELPHIA Marble Brownies

May 5, 2013 at 12:06 PM | Posted in baking, dessert, Egg Beaters | 6 Comments
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I made a couple of pans of the classic PHILADELPHIA Marble Brownies, one for the house here and another I took over to my Dad in the rehab center. Which he shared with the nurses and everyone was happy! I reduced the fat, calories and carbs by using a Betty Crocker Low Fat Brownie Mix, 1/3 Less Fat Philly Cream Cheese, Splenda Sugar, and Egg Beater‘s. You couldn’t tell the difference, they came out moist and tasty!

 

 

 

PHILADELPHIA Marble Brownies

Photo by Kraft

Photo by Kraft

A generations-old recipe that never loses its appeal mostly because, as one fan says, “It’s the BEST way to have both a brownie & a cheesecake simultaneously.”

What You Need
1 pkg. (18.3 to 19.5 oz.) brownie mix (family size)
1 pkg. (8 oz.) PHILADELPHIA Cream Cheese, softened
1/3 cup sugar
1 egg
1/2 tsp. vanilla
Make It
HEAT oven to 350ºF.

PREPARE brownie batter as directed on package; spread into greased 13×9-inch pan.

BEAT cream cheese with mixer until creamy. Add sugar, egg and vanilla; mix well. Drop by tablespoonfuls over brownie batter; swirl with knife.

BAKE 35 to 40 min. or until cream cheese mixture is lightly browned. Cool completely before cutting to serve. Keep refrigerated.
Kraft Kitchens TipsNoteFor best results, do not use brownie mix with a syrup pouch.Special ExtraSprinkle 1/2 cup BAKER’S Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chunks over brownie batter before baking.SubstitutePrepare using PHILADELPHIA Neufchatel Cheese
nutritional info per serving
Calories 150 Total fat 8 g Saturated fat 2.5 g Cholesterol 25 mg Sodium 80 mg Carbohydrate 17 g Dietary fiber 0 g Sugars 13 g Protein 2 g
http://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipes/philadelphia-marble-brownies-50925.aspx

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