Chicken Breast Strips w/ Cut Green Beans and Mashed Potatoes

October 19, 2014 at 5:07 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, chicken, Pilgrim's Chicken | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Chicken Breast Strips w/ Cut Green Beans and Mashed Potatoes

 

Pilgrim's Chicken Breast Strips 001

 

A windy and cool but sunny Fall Day here today. Went to Walmart early this morning to pick up some bulk items, only about 39 degrees. All the leaves are falling but it wasn’t a good year for the leaves turning color though. It’s Sunday so it’s afternoon of Football! So for my dinner I wanted a hot meal but I wanted one that was easy to prepare. So tonight its Breaded Chicken Breast Strips w/ Cut Green Beans and Mashed Potatoes.

 

 
While at Walmart this morning I picked up a bag of Pilgrim’s Southern Style Breast Strips. Nothing easier and more delicious than Pilgrim’s Southern Style Breast Strips, it’s always a great go to when you want that easy to prepare meal! It’s the best Frozen Chicken that I’ve found by far. Very easy to prepare; Preheat oven to 350° F. Arrange frozen chicken breast fritters in a single layer on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake, uncovered, for 25-30 minutes until no pink remains or an internal temperature of 165° F as measured by use of a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the chicken breast fritter. Chicken is served! As I said it’s some of the best frozen Chicken you can find! Excellent seasoned breading and very meaty, and easy to prepare. Served it with a side of JB’s Fat Boy Sticky Stuff BBQ Sauce.

 

Bob Evan's Mashed Potatoes
For one side I heated up a can of Del Monte Cut green Beans. Then I also prepared some Then I heated up some Bob Evans Mashed Potatoes, just microwave and done. I also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread that I buttered with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

 

Pilgrim’s Southern Style Breast Strips

Pilgrim’s Southern Style Breast Strips

Pilgrim’s Southern Style Breast Strips evoke memories of growing up in a sleepy southern town. The crickets chirping, the moss hanging from the trees, the air humid and everything moving slow in the heat. And your grandmother’s delicious home cooking brought the entire family around the table on the weekends.

Our Southern Style Breast Strips feature a juicy piece of chicken with a breading just right to deliver that southern flair. Our special blend of spices and seasonings with the whole muscle goodness of white breast meat will please kids and old-timers alike.

Ideal as:

Appetizers
Snacks
Lunch or Dinner Entrées
Crowd Pleasers

 

Cooking Instructions:

Oven: Preheat oven to 350° F. Arrange frozen chicken breast fritters in a single layer on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake, uncovered, for 25-30 minutes until no pink remains or an internal temperature of 165° F as measured by use of a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the chicken breast fritter.

Fryer: Heat oil to 350° F. Fry frozen chicken breast fritters for 6 minutes or an internal temperature of 165° F as measured by use of a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the chicken breast fritter.

Due to variations in equipment, heating times and/or temperature may require adjustment. DO NOT MICROWAVE.

 

Nutritional Guide
Serving Size: 4 oz. (112g)
Calories per Serving: 190

Servings per Container: About 8
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 6 g 9 %
Cholesterol 40 mg 13 %
Sodium 940 mg 39 %
Total Carbs 17 g 6 %
Dietary Fiber 1 g 4 %
Sugars 1 g
Protein 17 g

 

 

http://www.pilgrims.com/products/productinfo.aspx?id=10

Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Steam Crisp Sweet Corn and Cut Green Beans & Potatoes

October 4, 2014 at 5:09 PM | Posted in Green Giant, Perdue Chicken Products | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Steam Crisp Sweet Corn and Cut Green Beans & Potatoes

 

 

Perdue Oven ready Whole Bone In Breast 004
It’s been one cold and blustery day here today! Yes, I said COLD! Rolled out and grabbed the morning paper and it was 39 degrees with one cold wind blowing. They said with the wind chill factor we would struggle to get out of the 40’s and they were right. I can’t complain though, I love this cooler weather. Went to Kroger for Mom and myself and back home for an afternoon of College Football. For dinner tonight prepared a Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Steam Crisp Sweet Corn and Cut Green Beans & Potatoes.

 

 

 

 

perdue-whole-chicken-breast-002 (1)
I used the PERDUE® OVEN READY Whole Seasoned Roaster Bone-In Breast. As it says “Oven Ready’, already seasoned, and little clean-up needed plus always delicious. To prepare it just preheat the oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up. Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. If cooking from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF. Comes out piping hot, well seasoned, and delicious! Plenty leftovers for some Chicken Sandwiches or Chicken Tacos.

 

 

 
For one side I heated up a can of Green Giant Steam Crisp Super Sweet Yellow and White Whole Kernel Corn. My favorite canned corn, delicious Sweet Corn. Then I also heated up a couple of cans of Del Monte Cut Green Beans & Potatoes. Love this, contains my 2 favorites of Green Beans and Potatoes all in one can. We also had Healthy Life Whole Grain Sliced Bread. For dessert later a bowl of Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunks.

 

 

 

 

 

Perdue Oven Ready Whole Seasoned Roaster

PERDUE® OVEN READY Whole Seasoned Roaster Bone-In Breast (3 lbs.)

 

Deliciously seasoned and juicy, whole bone-in chicken breast. Oven ready for convenience. Cooks perfectly in the bag for easy clean up.

INGREDIENTS
*Ingredients: Chicken, water, salt, potassium and sodium phosphates, brown sugar, dextrose, carrageenan, yeast extract, maltodextrin, natural flavor.

*Seasoning Ingredients: Dextrose, modified food starch, onion, maltodextrin, natural flavor, garlic, cottonseed oil, dried carrot, xanthan gum, dried parsley, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, carrageenan.
PRODUCT HANDLING
Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave. Cook thoroughly.
**If breast temperature is below 180ºF, return to oven and continue cooking, checking the temperature every 10 minutes until the temperature reaches 180ºF.

COOKING AND PREP
• Preheat oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up.
• Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. Note: Cooking bag will expand during cooking; allow enough room for the bag to expand without touching oven rack or walls.
• Cook from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Cook from Frozen: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes. Cut open cooking bag (use care to avoid hot steam and juices) and transfer breast to serving plate or cutting board. Remaining juices in bag can be used for a delicious seasoned gravy.

 

Nutrition Facts:

Serving Size 4oz (112g)
Servings Per Container about 11
Amount Per Serving (* % of Daily Value)
Calories 170
Calories from Fat 80
Total Fat 9g (14%)
Saturated Fat 2.5g (13%)
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 60mg (20%)
Sodium 360mg (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 0g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0g (0%)
Sugars 0g
Protein 20g

 

 

http://www.perdue.com/products/details.asp?id=455&title=PERDUE%AE%20OVEN%20READY%20Whole%20Seasoned%20Roaster%20Bone-In%20Breast%20(3%20lbs.)

It’s all about the Chicken – Ground Chicken

September 30, 2014 at 5:18 AM | Posted in It's All About the Chicken | 1 Comment
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Ground Chicken

Ground chicken is simply chicken that has been ground or finely chopped. Ground chicken can be prepared at home or it can be bought from supermarkets, grocery stores or butcher shops. Ground chicken is minced or cubed chicken meat preferably from the less tender and less popular cuts of the chicken. Ground chicken or minced chicken is made of finely chopped chicken, minced by a meat grinder. One recipe example using Ground Chicken is Buffalo Chicken Chili.

 

 

 

Buffalo Chicken Chili

Ingredients

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons butter
2 pounds ground chicken breast
1 large carrot, peeled and finely chopped
1 large onion, chopped
3 stalks celery, finely chopped
5 cloves garlic, chopped
5 tablespoons chili powder
2 tablespoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon ground paprika
sea salt and pepper to taste
3/4 cups Swanson’s reduced sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup hot buffalo wing sauce, Frank’s® REDHOT Buffalo Wing Sauce or to taste
2 (15 ounce) cans tomato sauce
1 (15 ounce) can crushed tomatoes
1 (15 ounce) can white kidney or cannelloni beans, drained
1 (19 ounce) can red kidney beans, drained

 
Directions
1. Heat olive oil and butter in a large pot over medium-high heat. Place chicken in the pot. Cook and stir 7 to 10 minutes, until chicken is no longer pink. Stir in the carrot, onion, celery, garlic, chili powder, cumin, paprika, and salt and pepper, and cook and stir until the onion is translucent and the vegetables are beginning to soften, 3 to 4 more minutes.
2. Stir in the hot sauce, tomato sauce, crushed tomatoes, and white and red kidney beans. Bring to a boil, and simmer over medium-low heat about 1 hour, until the vegetables are tender and the flavors have blended.

 

 

Optional toppings:

Sargento reduced fat shredded cheddar
chopped scallions
Daisy reduced fat sour cream

It’s all about the Chicken – the Egg

September 23, 2014 at 5:26 AM | Posted in Eggs, It's All About the Chicken | 2 Comments
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Which came first the Chicken or the Egg? Going with the Egg today!
Eggs

White, speckled (red), and brown chicken eggs

White, speckled (red), and brown chicken eggs

Eggs are laid by female animals of many different species, including birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish, and have been eaten by humans for thousands of years. Bird and reptile eggs consist of a protective eggshell, albumen (egg white), and vitellus (egg yolk), contained within various thin membranes. Popular choices for egg consumption are chicken, duck, quail, roe, and caviar, but the egg most often consumed by humans is the chicken egg.

 

 

 

Egg yolks and whole eggs store significant amounts of protein and choline, and are widely used in cookery. Due to their protein content, the United States Department of Agriculture categorizes eggs as Meats within the Food Guide Pyramid. Despite the nutritional value of eggs, there are some potential health issues arising from egg quality, storage, and individual allergies.

Chickens and other egg-laying creatures are widely kept throughout the world, and mass production of chicken eggs is a global industry. In 2009, an estimated 62.1 million metric tons of eggs were produced worldwide from a total laying flock of approximately 6.4 billion hens. There are issues of regional variation in demand and expectation, as well as current debates concerning methods of mass production. The European Union recently banned battery husbandry of chickens.

 

 

 

A fried chicken egg, "sunny side up"

A fried chicken egg, “sunny side up”

Chicken eggs are widely used in many types of dishes, both sweet and savory, including many baked goods. Some of the most common preparation methods include scrambled, fried, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, omelettes and pickled. They can also be eaten raw, though this is not recommended for people who may be especially susceptible to salmonellosis, such as the elderly, the infirm, or pregnant women. In addition, the protein in raw eggs is only 51% bioavailable, whereas that of a cooked egg is nearer 91% bioavailable, meaning the protein of cooked eggs is nearly twice as absorbable as the protein from raw eggs.

As an ingredient, egg yolks are an important emulsifier in the kitchen, and are also used as a thickener in custards.

The albumen, or egg white, contains protein, but little or no fat, and can be used in cooking separately from the yolk. The proteins in egg white allow it to form foams and aerated dishes. Egg whites may be aerated or whipped to a light, fluffy consistency, and are often used in desserts such as meringues and mousse.

Ground egg shells are sometimes used as a food additive to deliver calcium. Every part of an egg is edible, although the eggshell is generally discarded. Some recipes call for immature or unlaid eggs, which are harvested after the hen is slaughtered or cooked while still inside the chicken.

 
Eggs contain multiple proteins which gel at different temperatures within the yolk and the white, and the temperature determines the gelling time. Egg yolk begins to gelify, or solidify, when it reaches temperatures between about 63 and 70 °C (145 and 158 °F). Egg white gels at slightly higher temperatures, about 60 to 80 °C (140 to 176 °F)- the white contains ovalbumin that sets at the highest temperature. However, in practice, in many cooking processes the white gels first because it is exposed to higher temperatures for longer.

Salmonella is killed instantly at 71 °C (160 °F), but is also killed from 54.5 °C (130.1 °F) if held there for sufficiently long time periods. To avoid the issue of salmonella, eggs can be pasteurised in-shell at 57 °C (135 °F) for an hour and 15 minutes. Although the white is slightly milkier, the eggs can be used in normal ways. Whipping for meringue takes significantly longer, but the final volume is virtually the same.

If a boiled egg is overcooked, a greenish ring sometimes appears around egg yolk due to the iron and sulfur compounds in the egg. It can also occur with an abundance of iron in the cooking water. The green ring does not affect the egg’s taste; overcooking, however, harms the quality of the protein. Chilling the egg for a few minutes in cold water until it is completely cooled may prevent the greenish ring from forming on the surface of the yolk.

 

 

Eggs for sale at a grocery store

Eggs for sale at a grocery store

The US Department of Agriculture grades eggs by the interior quality of the egg (see Haugh unit) and the appearance and condition of the egg shell. Eggs of any quality grade may differ in weight (size).

U.S. Grade AA
Eggs have whites that are thick and firm; yolks that are high, round, and practically free from defects; and clean, unbroken shells.
Grade AA and Grade A eggs are best for frying and poaching, where appearance is important.
U.S. Grade A
Eggs have characteristics of Grade AA eggs except the whites are “reasonably” firm.
This is the quality most often sold in stores.
U.S. Grade B
Eggs have whites that may be thinner and yolks that may be wider and flatter than eggs of higher grades. The shells must be unbroken, but may show slight stains.
This quality is seldom found in retail stores because they are usually used to make liquid, frozen, and dried egg products, as well as other egg-containing products.
In Australia and the European Union, eggs are graded by the hen farming method, free range, battery caged, etc.

Chicken eggs are also graded by size for the purpose of sales.

 

 

 

It’s all about the Chicken – Cooking with Chicken

September 16, 2014 at 5:46 AM | Posted in chicken, It's All About the Chicken | Leave a comment
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Chicken with mushrooms and tomatoes and spices

Chicken with mushrooms and tomatoes and spices

Raw chicken may contain salmonella. The safe minimum cooking temperature recommended by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services is 165 °F (74 °C) to prevent foodborne illness because of bacteria and parasites. However in Japan raw chicken is sometimes consumed in a dish called torisashi , which is sliced raw chicken served in sashimi style. Another preparation is toriwasa which is lightly seared on the outsides while the inside remains raw.

 

 

 

Chicken can be cooked in many ways. It can be made into sausages, skewered, put in salads, grilled, breaded and deep-fried, or used in various curries. There is significant variation in cooking methods amongst cultures. Historically common methods include roasting, baking, broasting, and frying. Western cuisine frequently has chicken prepared by deep-frying for fast foods such as fried chicken, chicken nuggets, chicken lollipops or buffalo wings. They are also often grilled for salads or tacos.

 

 

Chickens often come with labels such as “roaster”, which suggest a method of cooking based on the type of chicken. While these labels are only suggestions, ones labeled for stew often do not do well when cooked with other methods.

 

 

Some chicken breast cuts and processed chicken breast products include the moniker “with Rib Meat.” This is a misnomer, as it is the small piece of white meat that overlays the scapula, and is removed with the breast meat. The breast is cut from the chicken and sold as a solid cut, while the leftover breast and true rib meat is stripped from the bone through mechanical separation for use in chicken franks, for example. Breast meat is often sliced thinly and marketed as chicken slices, an easy filling for sandwiches. Often, the tenderloin (pectoralis minor) is marketed separately from the breast (pectoralis major). In the US, “tenders” can be either tenderloins or strips cut from the breast. In the UK the strips of pectoralis minor are called “Chicken mini-fillets”.

 

 

 

Chicken bones are hazardous to health as they tend to break into sharp splinters when eaten, but they can be simmered with vegetables and herbs for hours or even days to make chicken stock.

In Asian countries it is possible to buy bones alone as they are very popular for making chicken soups, which are said to be healthy. In Australia the rib cages and backs of chickens after the other cuts have been removed are frequently sold cheaply in supermarket delicatessen sections as either “chicken frames” or “chicken carcasses” and are purchased for soup or stock purposes.

 

Leftovers: Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Green Beans

September 13, 2014 at 5:08 PM | Posted in chicken, leftovers, Margaret Holmes Products | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Leftovers: Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Green Beans

 

Noodles n Chicken Baby Carrots 003
A beautiful morning turned into one beautiful day here today! It was about 54 this morning and had a high of about 63 degrees and sunny. Caught up on some laundry and got the cart out and went down to the neighborhood lake and did some fishing. Caught some Bluegill and a couple of small Bass, I released all of them back. Dad is getting a little stronger, Mom took him out to eat tonight at Richard’s. They love the Steak Hogies. For me it was Leftovers, Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Green Beans.

 

 
The Chicken ‘n’ Noodles were so good I couldn’t see them going to waste so it was Leftovers for me tonight! I reheated the Chicken ‘n’ Noodles and Mom had made some Green Beans the other night so I reheated those also. Here’s how to make my Chicken ‘n’ Noodles.

 

 
I used Margaret Holmes Simple Suppers Chicken n Noodles Fixins’. Another of my favorite Comfort Foods! I used to buy this at Walmart all the time but they no longer make it, lack of sales they say. So now I purchase it on-line from different sites, last of their stock. Anyway it comes in a 5 serving can and contains the Noodles and Seasoning, I added the Chicken. I cut up 2 Perdue Perfect Portions Chicken Breasts seasoning them with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, Ground Smoked Cumin, and Parsley. I then fried them in a large skillet until done and added the can of Fixins’. Cooked until it the Sauce was bubbling and heated throughout. The broth that’s with Noodles is incredible! Rich and thick and seasoned just right. Leftovers are a good thing! For dessert later more Leftovers; Mom had made some Fried Apples for Breakfast so I reheated those for dessert tonight.

 

 
Margaret Holmes Simple Suppers Chicken n’ NoodlesNoodles and Chicken 002

 

Chicken n’ Noodles will become a comfort-food favorite in any household. Add boneless, skinless chicken breast to a can of Simple Suppers Chicken n’ Noodles, which is filled with plump noodle dumplings and special seasonings.

 

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size Serving size 2/3 cup as packaged (174g)

 

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 45
Calories 230

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 3g 5%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 15mg 5%
Sodium 860mg 36%
Potassium 0mg
Total Carbohydrate 20g 7%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Sugars 0g
Protein 8g

 

 

http://www.margaretholmes.com/

Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Sliced Carrots and Whole Grain Bread

September 11, 2014 at 5:10 PM | Posted in carrots, Margaret Holmes Products, Perdue Chicken Products | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Sliced Carrots and Whole Grain Bread

 

 

Noodles n Chicken Baby Carrots 003
Had plenty of rain overnight, but no big storms as they predicted. After the rains passed through it took the high humidity and high temps with it. As our day went on the temperature kept dropping to about 71 degrees, love that! Dad finally got to come home today, about time! He’s doing a lot better, he’ll still have to take therapy here at the house for a while. But it beats staying at those rehab centers. For dinner tonight I prepared Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Sliced Carrots and Whole Grain Bread.

 

 
I used Margaret Holmes Simple Suppers Chicken n Noodles Fixins’. Another of my favorite Comfort Foods! I used to buy this at Walmart all the time but they no longer make it, lack of sales they say. So now I purchase it on-line from different sites, last of their stock. Anyway it comes in a 5 serving can and contains the Noodles and Seasoning, I added the Chicken. I cut up 2 Perdue Perfect Portions Chicken Breasts seasoning them with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, Ground Smoked Cumin, and Parsley. I then fried them in a large skillet until done and added the can of Fixins’. Cooked until it the Sauce was bubbling and heated throughout. The broth that’s with Noodles is incredible! Rich and thick and seasoned just right.

Noodles n Chicken Baby Carrots 004

 
I also had of side of Boiled Sliced Carrots leftover that I warmed up and a slice of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread, that I buttered with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter. Then for dessert later tonight a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

noodles-and-chicken-222

Margaret Holmes Simple Suppers Chicken n’ Noodles

Chicken n’ Noodles will become a comfort-food favorite in any household. Add boneless, skinless chicken breast to a can of Simple Suppers Chicken n’ Noodles, which is filled with plump noodle dumplings and special seasonings.

 

 

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size Serving size 2/3 cup as packaged (174g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 45
Calories 230

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 3g 5%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 15mg 5%
Sodium 860mg 36%
Potassium 0mg
Total Carbohydrate 20g 7%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Sugars 0g
Protein 8g

 

http://www.margaretholmes.com/

It’s all about the Chicken! – Chicken Buffalo Wings

September 9, 2014 at 6:16 AM | Posted in It's All About the Chicken | 1 Comment
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A bowl of hot Buffalo wings

A bowl of hot Buffalo wings

A Buffalo wing, Buffalo chicken wing, hot wing, or wing, in the cuisine of the United States, is a chicken wing section (wingette or drumette) that is generally deep-fried, unbreaded, and coated in vinegar-based cayenne pepper hot sauce and butter in the chicken. They are traditionally served hot, along with celery sticks and/or carrot sticks with blue cheese dressing for dipping.
Cayenne pepper hot sauce and melted butter or margarine are the basis of the sauce, which may be mild, medium, or hot. Typically, the wings are deep-fried in oil (although they are sometimes grilled or baked) until they are well browned. They are then drained, mixed with sauce, and shaken to coat the wings.

 

 
There are several different claims about how Buffalo wings were created.

One of the more prevalent claims is that Buffalo wings were first prepared at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, New York, by Teressa Bellissimo. who owned the bar along with her husband Frank. Several versions of the story have been circulated by the Bellissimo family and others:

* Upon the unannounced, late-night arrival of their son, Dominic, with several of his friends from college, Teressa needed a fast and easy snack to present to her hungry guests. It was then that she came up with the idea of deep-frying chicken wings (normally thrown away or reserved for stock) and tossing them in cayenne hot sauce.

* Dominic Bellissimo (Frank and Teressa’s son) told The New Yorker reporter Calvin Trillin in 1980: “It was Friday night in the bar and since people were buying a lot of drinks he wanted to do something nice for them at midnight when the mostly Catholic patrons would be able to eat meat again.” He stated that it was his mother, Teressa, who came up with the idea of chicken wings.
* There was mis-delivery of wings instead of backs and necks for making the bar’s spaghetti sauce. Faced with this unexpected resource, Frank Bellissimo says that he asked Teressa to do something with them.
However, a long article about the Anchor Bar in a local newspaper in 1969 does not mention Buffalo wings.

Another claim is that a man named John Young served chicken wings in a special “mambo sauce” at his Buffalo restaurant in the mid-1960s. His wings were breaded. Young had registered the name of his restaurant, John Young’s Wings ‘n Things, at the county courthouse before leaving Buffalo in 1970.

Marketing materials for Frank’s RedHot claim that it was the hot sauce used in the Bellissimos’ original recipe.

 

 

 

A cook preparing Buffalo wings

A cook preparing Buffalo wings

The city of Buffalo officially declared July 29, 1977, to be Chicken Wing Day.

Buffalo wings have become a popular bar food and appetizer across the United States and Canada. Large franchises specializing in Buffalo wings have emerged, notably Buffalo Wild Wings founded in 1982. As the market got larger, restaurants began to use a variety of sauces in addition to buffalo sauce. These sauces generally take influences from Chinese, Japanese, Caribbean, and Indian cuisines. Because of the mess caused by eating Buffalo wings, it is now common for restaurants to offer boneless wings that can be eaten with a fork. These are essentially chicken nuggets coated or spun in sauce. Many American-style restaurants in other countries will offer Buffalo chicken wings on their menus, especially if they also function as a bar.

Buffalo wings are used in competitive eating events, such as Philadelphia’s Wing Bowl and at the National Buffalo Wing Festival. It has also become commonplace for restaurants to offer a contest featuring a customer eating a certain number of wings, coated in their hottest sauce. Many bars and restaurants intentionally create an extra-hot sauce for this purpose, and customers are usually rewarded with a picture on the wall or free meal.

 

 
The appellation “Buffalo” is also now commonly applied to foods other than wings, including chicken fingers, chicken fries, chicken nuggets, popcorn chicken, shrimp, and pizza that are seasoned with the Buffalo-style sauce or variations of it.

The flavor of Buffalo wings is replicated by a number of dishes. A common variation on the “buffalo” sauce flavor is found in potato chips produced by a number of different companies. Many of these “Buffalo Chips” also incorporate a blue cheese flavoring to simulate the complete Buffalo wing experience.

 

 

 

Today, there are many flavors of prepared wings (wingettes and drumettes) available, besides the original hot Buffalo style. Flavors include barbecue, lemon pepper, pepper Parmesan, garlic, sweet-and-sour, and honey mustard. Since the first introduction, restaurants have introduced hundreds of different flavors of chicken wings.

 

Ultimate Grilled Chicken Recipes

September 7, 2014 at 5:40 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 2 Comments
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You can never have too many Chicken Recipes! So from the EatingWell website it’s; Ultimate Grilled Chicken Recipes.

 

 

EatingWell2

Fresh ideas for grilled chicken plus amazing recipes for brines, rubs, marinades, sauces and more.
Go beyond basic grilled chicken for all your festive summer barbecues and easy weeknight dinners on the deck. Mix and match flavorful sauces, salsas and more with every form of chicken you can buy. Whether you’re grilling the whole bird, enjoying grilled chicken breast on a bed of fresh greens or serving up party-friendly chicken kebabs, you’re bound to be inspired by these healthy and delicious grilled chicken recipes. So get grilling—and enjoy perfectly done, juicy chicken every time.

 
Buttermilk-Brined Chicken Breast with Basil-Mint Sauce
This healthy buttermilk chicken breast recipe has all the flavor of buttermilk fried chicken without the frying. The herb sauce recipe brings together mint, basil and ground coriander—perfect for serving with the chicken, or make extra and toss with pasta…..

 
Moroccan-Citrus Chicken with Grilled Peach-Lime Salsa
A potent blend of citrus zests and juices along with a quartet of aromatic spices makes this healthy and quick chicken marinade recipe amazing. For this sweet and peppery salsa recipe, fresh peaches are caramelized on the grill before being diced and stirred together with chopped jalapeño, lime juice and zest plus a sprinkle of chopped fresh cilantro. Serve the salsa with the grilled chicken or with a basket of chips….

 

 
* Click the link below to get all the Ultimate Grilled Chicken Recipes

 
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/ultimate_grilled_chicken_recipes?sssdmh=dm17.755953&utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw082614t

It’s all about the Chicken – Chicken Fingers and Chicken Nuggets

September 2, 2014 at 5:45 AM | Posted in It's All About the Chicken | Leave a comment
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It’s two of the favorite ways to have Chicken; Chicken Fingers and Chicken Nuggets

 

 

Chicken fingers

Chicken fingers

Chicken Fingers

 
Chicken fingers, also known as chicken tenders, chicken goujons, chicken strips or chicken fillets, are chicken meat prepared from the pectoralis minor muscles of the animal. These strips of white meat are located on either side of the breastbone, under the breast meat (pectoralis major).

Chicken fingers are prepared by dipping chicken meat in a breading mixture and then deep-frying them, in a manner similar to the preparation of Schnitzel.

 

 

In the Northeastern United States, chicken fingers served in Chinese restaurants are often made with an egg batter and have a smooth texture. They are commonly served either as an appetizer or as a main dish.

In other recipes, the breading mixture for chicken fingers can lack eggs and the texture of the dish itself can often be rather coarse. This version is often served alongside various dipping sauces. The dipping sauces can include: ketchup, blue cheese dressing, ranch dressing, barbecue sauce, honey mustard, Buffalo wing sauce, butter and garlic, plum sauce, curry mayonnaise, or sweet and sour sauce. Chicken fingers of this kind are often served in a basket with French fries, served on a garden salad, or in a sandwich, such as a wrap or on a bun.

Chicken fingers are offered by various fast food chains such as Chick-fil-A, Zaxby’s, Raising Cane’s, Guthrie’s, Dairy Queen, KFC, Spatola Restaurant, McDonald’s “Chicken Select Strips” and Church’s Chicken “Tender Strips”. They are also a common offering on children’s menus in American restaurants.

 

 

Some home-baked chicken nuggets

Some home-baked chicken nuggets

Chicken Nuggets

 
A chicken nugget is a chicken product made from either meat slurry or chicken breasts cut to shape, breaded or battered, then deep-fried or baked. Fast food restaurants typically fry their nuggets in vegetable oil, such as coconut oil.

The chicken nugget was invented in the 1950s by Robert C. Baker, a food science professor at Cornell University, and published as unpatented academic work. Dr. Baker’s innovations made it possible to form chicken nuggets in any shape. McDonald’s recipe for Chicken McNuggets was created on commission from McDonald’s by Tyson Foods in 1979 and the product was sold beginning in 1980.

Some fast food restaurants have launched vegetarian alternatives. McDonald’s served Garden McNuggets made of beans, Irish fast food chain R. Haecker’s offers a veggie nugget meal made with beans and cabbage, and Swedish fast food restaurant Max Hamburgare offers a dish containing nuggets made of falafel.
The largest recorded chicken nugget weighed 51.1 pounds (23.2 kg) and was 3.25 feet (0.99 m) long and 2 feet (0.61 m) wide and was created by Empire Kosher. It was unveiled at Kosherfest in Secaucus, New Jersey on October 29, 2013.

 

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