Seafood of the Week – Angels on Horseback

July 22, 2014 at 5:38 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
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Angels on horseback skewered and grilled.

Angels on horseback skewered and grilled.

Angels on horseback is a hot hors d’œuvre or savoury made of oysters wrapped with bacon. The dish, when served atop breads, can also be a canapé. Angels on horseback have had limited popularity, and have become regarded as a luxury or delicacy due to the elevated status of oysters in North America.

The dish is typically prepared by rolling shucked oysters in bacon and baking them in an oven. Modern variations of angels on horseback include skewering and frying. Serving can vary widely to taste on either skewers or breads, with additional accompaniments or condiments. Angels on horseback differ from the similar, fruit-based, devils on horseback, but the dishes’ names are sometimes erroneously considered synonyms.

 

 

 
Angels on horseback can be served a hors d’œuvre, as a canapé, or as a savoury. Angels on horseback are canapés when served with breads. In England, savouries are served after the desert and are salty or savoury items meant to cleanse the palette before the serving of wines. One cookbook including angels on horseback as a savoury is the 1905 Savouries Simplified, by Constance Peel.

Angels on horseback should not be confused with devils on horseback. The latter dish, which is derived from the former, uses fruit, typically prunes or dates. Devils on horseback continues to evolve and modernize; it is popular to steep the fruit in Cognac and Armagnac. American and British chefs including Martha Stewart and Martin Blunos recognise the distinction between the dishes, and though food writer John Ayto does too, he notes that the names have often been used interchangeably. This has been traced to a Chicago Tribune article and James Beard who “insisted that angels on horseback required ham as a wrapper, and that if bacon were used, what you’d have would be devils on horseback.”

 

 

 
The origins of the dish are unclear. The name most likely derives from the French anges à cheval, and there appears to be no significance in the oyster/angel and bacon/horse links. Its first occurrence, according to the Oxford English Dictionary and other sources, is in 1888, in Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management. However, there is a reference in an Australian newspaper to the dish, which includes a brief recipe, from 1882.

References to angels on horseback in the United States date to the mid- to late 1890s. One of the earliest references in an American newspaper is an 1896 article from the New York Times, where the dish is suggested as an appetizer; according to the Times, the dish is to be credited to Urbain Dubois, the chef of the German emperor. In this version, the angels on horseback are skewered, sprinkled with cayenne pepper, and broiled. The article suggests serving the dish with lemon and parsley, but without toast. In the 1930s, they are suggested as part of a picnic menu, and in 1948 again as an appetizer. In the 1950s, American newspapers featured the dish with interest, from papers including the Chicago Tribune, with the articles “For Oyster Treat, Try Angels on Horseback: They’re Delectable Appetizer Sunday Menu”, and “These Angels on Horseback Are Oysters”, and the Los Angeles Times.

Angels on horseback did achieve a certain popularity in the 1960s in Washington, D.C.; Evangeline Bruce, wife of US ambassador and diplomatic envoy David K. E. Bruce and renowned for her “Washington soirees”, served them regularly during the Kennedy administration but even there, the name itself was not commonplace, as suggested by the words of gossip columnist Liz Smith: “Sometimes the oysters were raw, sometimes they were grilled and wrapped in bacon. Then Mrs. Bruce called them Angels on Horseback.” As late as the 1980s, the Chicago Tribune published an article calling the dish “intriguing”, suggesting it had not yet become commonplace in the United States.

Publications from the 1990s onwards discuss angels on horseback as an indulgence or a delicacy with frequency. 1001 Foods to Die For noted it as an indulgence in North American due to the elevation of oysters to a delicacy status. The Diner’s Dictionary: Word Origins of Food and Drink noted that the luxury of oysters results in cocktail sausages replacing the oysters.

 

 

 
According to the classic recipe, shucked oysters are wrapped in bacon which is then broiled in the oven, about three minutes per side. An early recipe, from 1902, suggests frying the skewered oysters and bacon in butter. The dish is often served on toast, though if prepared on skewers and broiled, it can be eaten straight from the skewer.

Variations on the preparation and presentation of the angels on horseback vary considerably. In Feng Shui Food, it is prepared by rolling a shucked oyster in bacon and skewering it with a cocktail stick, fried and served with a squeeze of lime. Joanna Pruess’s book Seduced by Bacon includes a recipe for “Angels and Devils”, with the suggestion that “a little hot red pepper sauce can transform them from heavenly to hellishly hot tasting, or somewhere inbetween.” Myles Bader, author of The Wizard of Food’s Encyclopedia of Kitchen & Cooking Secrets, suggests serving angels on horseback on toast with a lemon wedge or hollandaise sauce. An Italian variant replaces bacon with prosciutto.

 

 

 

 

Angels on Horseback

This is just one of many versions of this recipe you make.
INGREDIENTS:
12 shucked oysters
12 slices bacon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon smoked paprika
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat an oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). Set a wire rack into a small baking dish.
2. Wrap each oyster with a slice of bacon, and secure with a toothpick. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, paprika, and parsley; set onto wire rack.
3. Bake in the preheated oven until the bacon is crispy, 10 to 12 minutes. Serve immediately. They aren’t as good once they get cold.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 22, 2014 at 5:34 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When I’m making my 3 Bean Buffalo Chili it’s so hard not to lift that Crock Pot lid and grab a quick whiff or a bite or two. But remember the crock pot is a lot like a little oven. When you lift the lid a lot of precious heat disappears. It is estimated that the crock pot will lose about 20 degrees of heat if the lid is left off for 2 minutes. So try not to lift the lid until you absolutely have to. When you do have to lift the lid to add ingredients, have them prepared and ready to go so that you don’t lose as much heat.

Leftovers – Shrimp and Andouille Sausage Jambalaya

July 21, 2014 at 5:11 PM | Posted in shrimp, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Leftovers – Shrimp and Andouille Sausage Jambalaya

 

 

Zatarains Jambalaya w Shrimp Andouie 011

As I finished a light Breakfast this morning, I did the dishes and began my morning workout. I always have the TV on when I’m exercising to make the time go quicker, big mistake this morning! I have the Cooking Channel on and the first show on is all about Donuts, Nooooo! I haven’t had many Donuts since I was diagnosed with Diabetes 2 several years ago. Back in the day now I could do a whole lot of damage to a dozen Donuts! But I avoid them now until today! Thank you Cooking Channel!!! Rather than fight it I went out and got a dozen for Mom and Dad and myself from Dunkin Donuts. Sticker Shock, Now it’s been a real long time since I purchased a dozen Donuts so I was amazed that a dozen costs $8.99 a dozen! I’m glad I don’t eat them anymore for that price. $8.99 for fried dough! Oh well I had 1 plain and 1 chocolate frosted and yearning was filled. Thanks again Cooking Channel! For dinner tonight it’s leftovers. I reheated the Shrimp and Andouille Sausage Jambalaya.

 

 

 

Zatarains Jambalaya w Shrimp Andouie 001
You have to love leftovers, perhaps the easiest meal of all to prepare. When I prepared it I used Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix (Reduced Sodium) for my base for the Jambalaya. I use Zatarain’s Products whenever I can, love the flavor and seasoning of all their products. To prepare it I just followed the easy instructions on the box. Mixed 2 1/2 cups of Water and 2 tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, and brought it to a boil. Added the Zatarain’s Jambalaya Mix and my Johnsonville Andouille Smoked Sausage, I had sliced the Sausage into smaller pieces before adding. Returned it to a boil, and then reduced the heat to low. Covered and simmered for about 25 minutes till most of the moisture had been absorbed. With 10 minutes left I added my (Kroger Brand) Jumbo Shrimp, till fully cooked and turned pink. Removed it from the heat and let it rest for about 5 minutes before I served it. The Andouille Sausage and Jumbo Shrimp make a fantastic pairing with the Jambalaya Mix! I added a couple of shakes of Frank’s Red Hot Sauce to the mix also, nothing like a little heat to kick things up! The meal was good the second time around as it was the first! The Rice and all the Meat warmed up perfectly. I also had a slice of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. This makes one delicious Jambalaya Dish. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 
Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix (Reduced Sodium)Zatarains Jambalaya Mix

 

Reduced Sodium Jambalaya Mix
Authentic New Orleans flavor with 25% less sodium than the original.

 

* This Easy-to-Prepare Dinner Mix Has Just The Right Blend of Ingredients For A Great-Tasting, Authentic New Orleans Style Meal. Zatarain’s Has Been The Leader In Authentic New Orleans Style Food Since 1889. So When You Want Great Flavor, Jazz It Up With Zatarain’s!
* Zatarain’s, New Orleans, La 70114. Comments Or Questions? Call 1-877-837-3796 Or Visit Us Online At Www.Zatarain.Com For Great Recipe Ideas and Product Information.
* A New Orleans Tradition Since 1889
* 25% Less Sodium Than Our Original Jambalaya Mix
* Add Meat to Make A Complete Meal
* Serves 6
Ingredients;
Enriched Long Grain Parboiled Rice (Iron Phosphate, Niacin, Thiamine Mononitrate and Folic Acid), Dehydrated Vegetables (Onion, Bell Pepper), Salt, Yeast Extract, Soy Sauce (100% Soybean), Dextrose, Thiamine Hydrochloride, Soybean Oil (Tbhq Added As A Preservative), Paprika, Potassium Chloride, Garlic, Spices, Monosodium Glutamate, Chili Powder, Caramel Color, Silicon Dioxide (Flow Agent).

 

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories: 130
Calories from Fat: 0
Total Fat: 0 0%
Saturated Fat: 0 0%
Cholesterol: 0mg 0%
Sodium: 360mg 15%
Total Carb: 29g 10%
Dietary Fiber: <1g 4%
Sugar: 0g
Protein: 3g

 
http://www.zatarains.com/Products/Reduced-Sodium/Reduced-Sodium-Jambalaya.aspx

 

“Meatless Monday” Recipe – Antipasto Pizza

July 21, 2014 at 7:55 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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Another “Meatless Monday” Masterpiece from the CooksRecipes website. This weeks is Antipasto Pizza. With Artichokes, Red Bell Peppers, and Olives you know it’s going to be good! I’ve left the link to the Pizza at the end of the post but while there check out their huge listing of fantastic recipes. http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

 

Antipasto PizzaCooksrecipes 2

Antipasto PizzaPizza layered with artichoke halves, Italian salad dressing, ripe olives and pieces of bright red bell peppers.

Recipe Ingredients:

1 (12-inch) pre-baked thin pizza crust, warmed according to package directions
10 artichoke hearts, halved or quartered
6 tablespoons Italian salad dressing, or as desired
1 (2.25-ounce) can sliced ripe olives, drained
1/4 cup chopped red bell pepper
2 tablespoons chopped pepperoncini (optional)

Cooking Directions:

Layer ingredients and serve.
Makes 4 servings.

 

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/antipasto_pizza_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Soup Beans

July 21, 2014 at 5:40 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Soup Beans

Soup Beans

Soup beans is a term common in the Southern United States, particularly the regions around the Appalachian Mountains. It refers to pinto or other brown dried beans cooked with smoked pork as flavoring. Soup beans are usually served with cornbread, greens (such as boiled cabbage, cauliflower, or fried sauerkraut and weenies), corn (whole or sweet), and potatoes (stewed or fried) and may be topped with raw chopped onions. The meal is often topped with pickle relish. Soup beans are considered a main course, but also serve as a side dish. In rural areas, where food was scarce during the winter, these dried beans were a staple food.

 

 

 
While soup beans are traditionally brown beans, other types of beans are also used.

* White Beans — Great northern beans and Navy beans are often used to make a soup bean dish. This became more common as residents of rural areas began to rely more on store-bought beans and could afford more variety. This dish is typically referred to as “white beans” although it is occasionally called soup beans. Along with the beans, white beans are typically cooked in the juice of a country ham, often with the ham bone or ham included in the dish. As such, this dish is a prized part of holiday meals, when hams are baked. White beans are sometimes cooked with pork fat like brown soup beans, although this is less common. White beans carried an air of sophistication because they were first available in towns to people who could afford more than one type of bean and ham, as opposed to poorer rural people who often raised only brown beans.
*Butter Beans — butter beans are used to make the soup bean dish called butter beans. These dried limas are cooked, with smoked pork and/or ham until the sauce starts to thicken, hence the name “butter” beans. Like white beans, butter beans represented prosperity and were often prized dishes when served. Butter beans only refers to dried limas. Fresh or canned limas are called “lima beans”.
* Black-eyed Peas — While these peas are almost never referred to as “soup beans”, the preparation in the Appalachian region is almost identical. Black-eyed Peas, sometimes called blackeye peas, are most common where Appalachian culture intersects with lowland soul-food and coastal food cultures. Like Hoppin’ John, black-eyed peas became common as a new year’s dish. However, since rice was not a part of mountain culture, the peas were cooked with pork (usually hog jowls) like soup beans and served with stewed tomatoes and collard greens. This dish becomes less common as you move into more isolated mountain communities.
Red kidney beans and mediterranean beans, peas, and lentils have never been a significant part of mountain culture.

 

 

 
While soup beans might be served with any meal, they were typically the main course in a meatless supper. Traditionally, soup beans would be served with other home grown vegetables and homemade breads:

* Corn Bread — Prior to the availability of milled flour, thin, crispy fried yellow cornbread cakes called hoecakes or baked cornbread are sometimes served with a soup-bean supper. Often the beans are served atop a bed of crumbled cornbread, or cornbread may be crumbled into a bowl of beans, almost like adding crackers to chili.
* Potatoes — Irish white potatoes were typically served, especially during the winter months, boiled, mashed or fried (boiled then pan fried). In lowland areas, sweet potatoes are commonly served.
* Greens — Most commonly collard or creasy greens. Slow cooked with smoked pork or bacon grease.
* Ramps/Onions — Strong native onions called ramps were often served raw. They were often cut up onto the beans as seasonings other than salt and local herbs were not available for a long time. Ramps were replaced by cultivated onions.
Modern additions:

Modern supermarkets and processed foods have led to two additions to soup bean suppers which are not traditional.

* Salmon Cakes: The availability of canned salmon led to salmon cakes being included with soup beans. The tastes are complimentary and salmon, like any purchased meat, would be considered a luxury and not cooked in large quantities.
* Macaroni and Cheese — Cheese and pasta have no background in mountain cultures. Supermarkets made processed cheese and pasta available, as well as boxed dinners. Macaroni and cheese was inexpensive and easy to add to a soup bean meal. Macaroni was often served with canned tomatoes in a dish called macaroni and tomatoes and often “macaroni and cheese ” in mountain homes meant the inclusion of tomatoes.

 

 

 
Soup beans were such a staple during the winter that general stores, when they began carrying dried beans, carried 50 lb. bags alongside the typical 1, 2, & 5 lb. bags. Soup beans are often re-cooked as fried bean cakes, or made into mountain chili the next day. In the winter months, a pot of beans simmered on the stove of every house every day.

Pinto beans, along with corn meal, represent an unusual connection between mountain and southwestern and Mexican cuisine.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 21, 2014 at 5:35 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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We’ve all came across this problem when grilling; When grilling meat, sometimes it sticks to the grill even though you cleaned the grill thoroughly and oiled it well. When grilling items that do not have any external spices or marinades, try spraying the meat with non-stick cooking spray, such as Pam, before you place on the grill. It will not only help keep it from sticking, but it will also help keep the meat from drying out. When you go to turn it, if it still appears to be sticking, let it cook for a few more minutes until you can lift it without any resistance.

Weight Watchers Smart Ones Smart Creations Fish & Chips

July 20, 2014 at 5:11 PM | Posted in fish, Weight Watchers | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Weight Watchers Smart Ones Smart Creations Fish & Chips

 

 

Smart Ones Fish and Chips

 

Well our Summer Weather has returned, mid 80′s and humid! But we did have a real nice streak of fantastic weather. Got out and stopped by some friends house for most of the day and then returned home to work on some computer problems I’m still having. I wish I knew more on working with and on computers. For dinner tonight Weight Watchers Smart Ones Smart Creations Fish & Chips.

 

 

 
I originally was going to have Panko Crusted Calamari w/ Brown and Wild Rice. I had prepped them and fried the first batch. Let it cool a bit and sampled it, and that’s as far as that got. Calamari is just not for me. So it was a last minute switch in menu, saved by Weight Watchers Smart Ones Smart Creations Fish & Chips. First time I had tried this one and it sure saved the day! The Fish was very good, good seasoning and breading. The Chips or Fries were very good also, I love any Fry! The dinner was only 310 calories and 34 net carbs per serving, and the serving size were just enough. Frozen dinners do come in handy! For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Mousse.

 

 

 

 

Weight Watchers Smart Ones Smart Creations Fish & ChipsSmart Ones Fish and Chips

Weight Watchers Smart Ones is committed to providing smart food choices to support you while managing your weight. That’s why Weight Watchers Smart Ones follows a set of six smart eating principles when creating food for you, like Weight Watchers Smart Ones Smart Creations Fish & Chips. Weight Watchers Smart Ones promises to be there throughout the day with smart breakfasts, snacks, meals and desserts inspired by these principles: 1. Portion control so you can eat the foods you love. 2. Breakfast is crucial, because it starts your day right and helps control hunger. 3. Smart eating includes a variety of foods with protein. 4. Whole grains, fruits and vegetables can keep you fuller, longer. 5. Smart desserts and snacks can help you stay on track. 6. Support and knowledge are critical to making smart food choices.

Weight Watchers Smart Ones Smart Creations Fish & Chips:
* Crispy Alaskan white pollock fillet
* With salt and pepper crinkle cut french fried potatoes
* Excellent source of protein
* 310 calories; 14g fat; 2g fiber; 11g protein
* 8 PointsPlus value

 

http://www.eatyourbest.com/products/smart-creations/fish-chips.aspx

Ultimate Grilled Chicken Recipes

July 20, 2014 at 5:31 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Get your grill on with EatingWell’s Ultimate Grilled Chicken Recipes! Brines, Seasonings, and Grilling Recipes and it’s all from the EatingWell website.

 

 

Ultimate Grilled Chicken RecipesEatingWell2
Fresh ideas for grilled chicken plus amazing recipes for brines, rubs, marinades, sauces and more.
Go beyond basic grilled chicken for all your festive summer barbecues and easy weeknight dinners on the deck. Mix and match flavorful sauces, salsas and more with every form of chicken you can buy. Whether you’re grilling the whole bird, enjoying grilled chicken breast on a bed of fresh greens or serving up party-friendly chicken kebabs, you’re bound to be inspired by these healthy and delicious grilled chicken recipes. So get grilling—and enjoy perfectly done, juicy chicken every time.

 

 

Buttermilk-Brined Chicken Breast with Basil-Mint Sauce
This healthy buttermilk chicken breast recipe has all the flavor of buttermilk fried chicken without the frying. The herb sauce recipe brings together mint, basil and ground coriander—perfect for serving with the chicken, or make extra and toss with pasta.

 

 

Moroccan-Citrus Chicken with Grilled Peach-Lime Salsa
A potent blend of citrus zests and juices along with a quartet of aromatic spices makes this healthy and quick chicken marinade recipe amazing. For this sweet and peppery salsa recipe, fresh peaches are caramelized on the grill before being diced and stirred together with chopped jalapeño, lime juice and zest plus a sprinkle of chopped fresh cilantro. Serve the salsa with the grilled chicken or with a basket of chips.

 
* Click the link below to get the Ultimate Grilled Chicken Recipes

 
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/ultimate_grilled_chicken_recipes?slide=2#leaderboardad

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 20, 2014 at 5:27 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Who doesn’t cook too much spaghetti! If you cooked up spaghetti for dinner, but you have some spaghetti and sauce left over, simply layer the spaghetti, sauce, and some cheese slices in to a casserole dish. Cover tightly and place in the freezer. Then the next time that you need a quick dinner, pull from the freezer and place in a preheated oven at 350 degrees. Bake for 35-40 minutes until bubbly on top.

Shrimp and Andouille Sausage Jambalaya

July 19, 2014 at 5:10 PM | Posted in Johnsonville Meats, shrimp, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Shrimp and Andouille Sausage Jambalaya

 

Zatarains Jambalaya w Shrimp Andouie 011

 
It’s been a dreary and humid day out today. Stopped at Kroger this morning and picked up a couple of items for dinner tonight and then stopped the Union Center Farmer’s Market. First time I’ve been over there in a couple of years, it’s almost doubled in size since I was there last. Returned home and just did some odds and ends around the house. For my dinner I prepared Shrimp and Andouille Sausage Jambalaya.

 

 

 

 

Zatarains Jambalaya w Shrimp Andouie 001
I used Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix (Reduced Sodium) for my base for the Jambalaya. I use Zatarain’s Products whenever I can, love the flavor and seasoning of all their products. To prepare it I just followed the easy instructions on the box. Mixed 2 1/2 cups of Water and 2 tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, and brought it to a boil. Added the Zatarain’s Jambalaya Mix and my Johnsonville Andouille Smoked Sausage, I had sliced the Sausage into smaller pieces before adding. Returned it to a boil, and then reduced the heat to low. Covered and simmered for about 25 minutes till most of the moisture had been absorbed. With 10 minutes left I added my (Kroger Brand) Jumbo Shrimp, till fully cooked and turned pink. Removed it from the heat and let it rest for about 5 minutes before I served it. The Andouille Sausage and Jumbo Shrimp make a fantastic pairing with the Jambalaya Mix! I added a couple of shakes of Frank’s Red Hot Sauce to the mix also, nothing like a little heat to kick things up! Also had a slice of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. This makes one delicious Jambalaya Dish. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Vanilla Bean Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Jambalaya Mix (Reduced Sodium)Zatarains Jambalaya Mix

 

Reduced Sodium Jambalaya Mix
Authentic New Orleans flavor with 25% less sodium than the original.

* This Easy-to-Prepare Dinner Mix Has Just The Right Blend of Ingredients For A Great-Tasting, Authentic New Orleans Style Meal. Zatarain’s Has Been The Leader In Authentic New Orleans Style Food Since 1889. So When You Want Great Flavor, Jazz It Up With Zatarain’s!
* Zatarain’s, New Orleans, La 70114. Comments Or Questions? Call 1-877-837-3796 Or Visit Us Online At Www.Zatarain.Com For Great Recipe Ideas and Product Information.
* A New Orleans Tradition Since 1889
* 25% Less Sodium Than Our Original Jambalaya Mix
* Add Meat to Make A Complete Meal
* Serves 6
Ingredients;
Enriched Long Grain Parboiled Rice (Iron Phosphate, Niacin, Thiamine Mononitrate and Folic Acid), Dehydrated Vegetables (Onion, Bell Pepper), Salt, Yeast Extract, Soy Sauce (100% Soybean), Dextrose, Thiamine Hydrochloride, Soybean Oil (Tbhq Added As A Preservative), Paprika, Potassium Chloride, Garlic, Spices, Monosodium Glutamate, Chili Powder, Caramel Color, Silicon Dioxide (Flow Agent).

 

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories: 130
Calories from Fat: 0
Total Fat: 0 0%
Saturated Fat: 0 0%
Cholesterol: 0mg 0%
Sodium: 360mg 15%
Total Carb: 29g 10%
Dietary Fiber: <1g 4%
Sugar: 0g
Protein: 3g

 
http://www.zatarains.com/Products/Reduced-Sodium/Reduced-Sodium-Jambalaya.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

Johnsonville Andouille Smoked (Rope) SausageJohnsonville Andouille Split Rope

 

COOKING DIRECTIONS

These products are fully cooked and ready to eat out of the package or be prepared to your liking!
Pan-Heating

Place sausage in a skillet.
Add 1/2-inch of water.
Bring to a boil; reduce heat to low.
Cover and simmer for 10 minutes or until heated through, turning links once.
STORAGE

For freshness, keep refrigerated and use by the date stamped on the package. Opened packages should be consumed within 7 days, or freeze no longer than 30 days.
INGREDIENTS

NO FILLERS
GLUTEN-FREE
DAIRY FREE
Pork, water and less than 2% of the following: salt, corn syrup, beef, spices, sodium phosphate, paprika, dextrose, onion powder, dehydrated garlic, sodium erythorbate, sodium nitrite, flavorings, collagen casings.
NUTRITION FACTS
Serving Size: 2 oz. (56g)
Servings per Container: 7
Calories: 170
Calories from Fat: 140
% Daily Value *
Total Fat: 15g 24%
Saturated Fat: 5g 26%%
Trans Fat: 0g
Total Cholesterol: 35mg 12%
Sodium: 530mg 22%
Total Carbohydrates: 1g 0%
Dietary Fiber: 0g 0%
Sugars: 0g
Total Protein: 7g

 
http://www.johnsonville.com/products/premium-andouille-sausage.html

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